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Johnoco

Can Comedians Survive?

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Subject to getting tickets tonight, I'm going to see Dave Spikey tomorrow evening. Time will tell if it will he'll be any good, but I'm optimistic it will be a good night out.

I saw Dave Spikey a few years ago and was front row centre. It was a little like the Ludovico technique scene from A Clockwork Orange. It wasn't good, but I couldn't get up and leave...

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If what little bit of Comic Relief I have seen tonight is anything to go by comedy in this country is already dead.

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If what little bit of Comic Relief I have seen tonight is anything to go by comedy in this country is already dead.

I hate it - it actually puts me off donating.

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Yeah, there is a lot of that certainly a lot of comics are incredibly bitchy about him. I think it’s because what he does seems like anyone can do it and he makes it look quite easy, when in fact it’s really hard to do it and get it right, to the degree he does. I happen to like him, but I don’t have a problem with people in general not liking him – comedy is a very subjective thing and a surprisingly emotive one in this country. I do have a problem with comics endlessly having a dig though especially when sometimes they are doing a less successful version of his act (observational comedy can be horrendous if you don’t get it right in my opinion).

I do think there will be a backlash against “arena” comedians sooner rather than later – or the venues anyway. Personally I think they are pretty cold affairs compared to the theatre/club set up – especially if you are at further back essentially watching on a screen. A lot of comedians who used to do them have scaled them back or now refuse to do them. I guess though whilst people are still willing to pay silly money to go see some of the bigger guys at an arena they’ll keep going (much like big rock/pop stars)

We saw Stewart Lee at the Stand comedy club at the edinburgh festival, must have been no more than about 120 in the room but he had every person hanging on his every word. This was the year he did the Top Gear piece.

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If what little bit of Comic Relief I have seen tonight is anything to go by comedy in this country is already dead.

I thought the Call the Midwife sketch and the return of David Brent were both very funny.

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If what little bit of Comic Relief I have seen tonight is anything to go by comedy in this country is already dead.

So if we pay £20 they will stay off our screens for another 12 months, right?

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We saw Stewart Lee at the Stand comedy club at the edinburgh festival, must have been no more than about 120 in the room but he had every person hanging on his every word. This was the year he did the Top Gear piece.

Yep, seen him a couple of times.I know he'll never be mainstream, but I'd recommend his book "How I Escaped my Certain Fate" for an excellent look at how comedy evolves, how audiences can effect a night and a surprisingly considered look at the state of standup in this country. One for the comedy geeks only, but worth it if you are.

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Lee is a strange one. He comes across as a bit of a ###### but makes some interesting and funny observations.

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For me, live comedy is less about the material and more about the delivery and having a good night out.

I have seen some bands several times - I know what I'm getting, I've listened to the songs to death, but there is still nothing to match the feeling of watching a band live.

Comedy is the same to me. Some comedians are just brilliantly funny when you see them live - they could actually say nothing and you'd still laugh!

Also, the atmosphere in the room can really enhance the occasion - once you get caught up in it you can't help but enjoy it.

Whether it's a headline show by someone quite famous, or a random selection of unknowns at a pub comedy night, I nearly always leave with a smile on my face knowing that I've had a great night. The Internet, DVDs, YouTube, Facebook etc cannot replicate that feeling.

And now I'm looking forward to checking out a few acts at the Melbourne Comedy Festival later this month :-)

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And now I'm looking forward to checking out a few acts at the Melbourne Comedy Festival later this month :-)

Have fun! Also, try and see some lesser known acts rather than the big names. I've had some fantastic surprises in the past.

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I agree with what others have said. Comedy is all about the delivery and timing, as well as those jokes you get on the night (ie. responding to hecklers, taking the ###### out of someone in the audience).

Music is changing and for the better IMO. It is now very easy to distribute music and monetise your work without having to get the backing of a record company. Services such as youtube and spotify allow people to easily discover new music and Amazon, iTunes etc. make it easy to sell. Radiohead earned more from In Rainbows than they had from any of their previous albums.

Slightly off topic (sort of), but I was chatting to an outspoken, mildly successful producer of electronic music last night, and he went off on one about the way the music industry has changed. I'm all for democratising music and allowing anyone with creative flair to get their music out there (I've pressed up records myself in the past, and it's not as daunting as people might think), but he has a point when he says that it can be hard to find brilliant music because of all the "noise". There was once a time when you would read NME and other music papers/mags to find out what was happening and discover new music. For all their faults, these magazines helped to steer the agenda. Now, with many millions of blogs, online reviews sites etc, you don't need them. Yet with more music out there than ever, we do. In the days when I was a staffer at a music magazine, one of my jobs was deciding what to cover and what to review. That was a difficult enough task then with a more structured music industry. Now, it would be near impossible without spending 12 hours a day listening to new music - and even then you'd start losing the will to live quite quickly, due to the amount of mediocre, soundalike fluff. The greatest obscure music will always find an audience, but it's not as easy as it once was.

He also moaned about the standards of music journalism dropping, but that's a different argument.

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Slightly off topic (sort of), but I was chatting to an outspoken, mildly successful producer of electronic music last night, and he went off on one about the way the music industry has changed. I'm all for democratising music and allowing anyone with creative flair to get their music out there (I've pressed up records myself in the past, and it's not as daunting as people might think), but he has a point when he says that it can be hard to find brilliant music because of all the "noise". There was once a time when you would read NME and other music papers/mags to find out what was happening and discover new music. For all their faults, these magazines helped to steer the agenda. Now, with many millions of blogs, online reviews sites etc, you don't need them. Yet with more music out there than ever, we do. In the days when I was a staffer at a music magazine, one of my jobs was deciding what to cover and what to review. That was a difficult enough task then with a more structured music industry. Now, it would be near impossible without spending 12 hours a day listening to new music - and even then you'd start losing the will to live quite quickly, due to the amount of mediocre, soundalike fluff. The greatest obscure music will always find an audience, but it's not as easy as it once was.

He also moaned about the standards of music journalism dropping, but that's a different argument.

Sounds like people against any change are those who have most to lose or are seeing there way of doing things becoming obsolete. The internet isn't going to be uninvented so the music industry must change with it.

I agree with you about the signal to noise ratio. In the future I think we're less likely to see a small number of artists become huge as opposed to lots of artists getting their chance in the limelight.

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In the future I think we're less likely to see a small number of artists become huge as opposed to lots of artists getting their chance in the limelight.

Get your CDs in the supermarkets and you're made. Same with books. Unfortunately, it appears you have to fall beneath a certain quality requirement in order to do so. :P

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If Mrs Browns Boys can fill concert halls then comedy should have no problems.

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If Mrs Browns Boys can fill concert halls then comedy should have no problems.

:lol: :lol:

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If Mrs Browns Boys can fill concert halls then comedy should have no problems.

Saw the Christmas special. Really didn't see what the fuss is about. Comedy has moved on from the 70s/80s.

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Its the worst comedy show Ive ever seen... atleast Whitney is sort of fit!

I hear my parents howling and I just dont get it? Is it cause its a bloke in a dress and swearing is funnier in an Irish accent?

Another thing, just because they share a nationality, doesn't mean its the same level, so if anybody compares it to Father Ted they deserve a slap upside the head.

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