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gazza77

Driving in heavy snow and thick fog - some advice

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*Rant mode on*

  • Clear the snow from your car so that you can see out of all of the windows
  • Clear the snow off your lights so other people can see them
  • Turn said lights on
  • Don't drive inches behind the car in front, so you don't end up with brown trousers when they slow down and you have to try to brake
  • Don't approach junctions at speed then try to stop suddenly, causing you to slide out into the middle of the road in front of oncomining traffic

*Rant mode off*

Aimed at those without any common sense, which appears to make up a significant minority of drivers in the Keighley area this morning. :angry:

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*Rant mode on*

  • Clear the snow from your car so that you can see out of all of the windows
  • Clear the snow off your lights so other people can see them
  • Turn said lights on
  • Don't drive inches behind the car in front, so you don't end up with brown trousers when they slow down and you have to try to brake
  • Don't approach junctions at speed then try to stop suddenly, causing you to slide out into the middle of the road in front of oncomining traffic

*Rant mode off*

Aimed at those without any common sense, which appears to make up a significant minority of drivers in the Keighley area this morning. :angry:

I've just took a heavy tumble in the conditions and quite sore. That said, not one driver in vehicles queued opposite wound down their windows to see if I was okay, with one couple laughing! Aside of this, vehicle after vehicle passed my car the other day on the motorway doing more than the speed limit of 50mph. There will be accidents today caused by idiots who think accidents only happen to others.

To think I was mowing the lawn yesterday! :mellow:

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I've just took a heavy tumble in the conditions and quite sore.

A couple of years ago, I got tired of shuffling gingerly around every time the snow and ice came (although that's not very often in London). So I bought a pair of these most excellent accessories.

51nqGZekMrL._SY395_.jpg

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I've just took a heavy tumble in the conditions and quite sore. That said, not one driver in vehicles queued opposite wound down their windows to see if I was okay, with one couple laughing! Aside of this, vehicle after vehicle passed my car the other day on the motorway doing more than the speed limit of 50mph. There will be accidents today caused by idiots who think accidents only happen to others.

To think I was mowing the lawn yesterday! :mellow:

Hope you didn't injure too much other than your pride.

Futtocks suggestion is probably not a bad one. I don't tend to walk that much in snow and ice on pavements, it's more over foothpaths and fields. After landing on my backside on some snow covered ice a couple of years ago whilst out on the moors, I meant to buy a set of microspikes for walking, but haven't got round to it yet. These probably wouldn't be so much use on pavements though.

http://www.pogu.co.uk/outdoor-equipment/pogu-foot-spikes-walking-hiking-rambling-ice-shoe-boots.html

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Hope you didn't injure too much other than your pride.

Futtocks suggestion is probably not a bad one. I don't tend to walk that much in snow and ice on pavements, it's more over foothpaths and fields. After landing on my backside on some snow covered ice a couple of years ago whilst out on the moors, I meant to buy a set of microspikes for walking, but haven't got round to it yet. These probably wouldn't be so much use on pavements though.

http://www.pogu.co.u...shoe-boots.html

The Ice Runners that I have are fine on ice and snow, whatever's underneath. They do feel (and sound) odd when you have to cross an area that's not affected, like under a bridge. When there's only a patchy covering of ice, it's better to walk without them.

An elderly friend, who's had a stroke and is a little unsteady at the best of times, bought a pair, and it means he isn't trapped indoors when the weather's bad.

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Here's a tip for the non-construction workers.

Never buy wellies to wear in the snow. Get a pair of rigger boots ... easier to put on, far more comfortable and they have a fleecy warm lining.

Go to an industrial safety footwear shop and you should get a pair for less than £30.

http://www.google.co.uk/#q=rigger+boots&hl=en&source=univ&tbm=shop&tbo=u&sa=X&ei=SlZMUa-mJYT60gXlgYHgDg&ved=0CFoQsxg&bav=on.2,or.r_qf.&bvm=bv.44158598,d.ZWU&fp=aaa23140435a023b&biw=1110&bih=743

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It seems the best advice gazza is to walk... :lol:

I'd quite happily walk, I bet it would be quite a nice route from home to work. 32 mile round trip though, I'd only be working short hours. ;):D

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I'd quite happily walk, I bet it would be quite a nice route from home to work. 32 mile round trip though, I'd only be working short hours. ;):D

Pah, part timer. I'm 84-y'know.

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Pah, part timer. I'm 84-y'know.

Sorry Grandad. :P

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Here's a tip for the non-construction workers.

Never buy wellies to wear in the snow. Get a pair of rigger boots ... easier to put on, far more comfortable and they have a fleecy warm lining.

Go to an industrial safety footwear shop and you should get a pair for less than £30.

http://www.google.co...iw=1110&bih=743

Riggers are banned by a lot of construction firms now and they are horrible to wear.

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*Rant mode on*

  • Clear the snow from your car so that you can see out of all of the windows
  • Clear the snow off your lights so other people can see them
  • Turn said lights on
  • Don't drive inches behind the car in front, so you don't end up with brown trousers when they slow down and you have to try to brake
  • Don't approach junctions at speed then try to stop suddenly, causing you to slide out into the middle of the road in front of oncomining traffic

*Rant mode off*

Aimed at those without any common sense, which appears to make up a significant minority of drivers in the Keighley area this morning. :angry:

Drive in a higher gear than normal.

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Drive in a higher gear than normal.

Mountain climbing outfit? I guess at least you'd keep warm.

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Mountain climbing outfit? I guess at least you'd keep warm.

Oof.

If you're here all week then thank #### it's Friday.

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Oof.

If you're here all week then thank #### it's Friday.

And I'm here all night for Wire v Hudds.

You're up for it I'm sure.

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Riggers are banned by a lot of construction firms now and they are horrible to wear.

They are banned on some sites because of a perceived lack of ankle support and they are not good for climbing ladders.

I know some people (including me) find them a bit awkward to wear at first because the hard overlocked seam of jeans rub against their ankles. I immediately found that wearing Regatta-type work trousers, chinos, normal trousers or track suit bottoms resolved any problems. I now find riggers really comfortable to wear.

Either way, they are warmer and more comfy than wellies to wear in snow

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They are banned on some sites because of a perceived lack of ankle support and they are not good for climbing ladders.

I know some people (including me) find them a bit awkward to wear at first because the hard overlocked seam of jeans rub against their ankles. I immediately found that wearing Regatta-type work trousers, chinos, normal trousers or track suit bottoms resolved any problems. I now find riggers really comfortable to wear.

Either way, they are warmer and more comfy than wellies to wear in snow

When i was a tower crane driver/erector i used to wear rigger boots. Never had a problem climbing vertical ladders. I used to love them for working in.

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When i was a tower crane driver/erector i used to wear rigger boots. Never had a problem climbing vertical ladders. I used to love them for working in.

hated them when I was working for Reevesy. Muck and stones got down them too easily. Best work boots I ever had were Dickies laceups.

I've just got back from walking my dogs and helped push a guy and his car out of Leodensians car park. He was clueless and would have stuck there til June if left to his own devices.

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hated them when I was working for Reevesy. Muck and stones got down them too easily. Best work boots I ever had were Dickies laceups.

I've just got back from walking my dogs and helped push a guy and his car out of Leodensians car park. He was clueless and would have stuck there til June if left to his own devices.

Have to say Chris most people have no real idea of how to dive in the snow.

Last night a guy across the road got stuck. As he tried to sort it out, all that was happening was he was sliding backwards towards my car. His family were trying to push him away from my car.

I went out to offer help. He didnt like the fact that i offered. So he said "ok then clever clogs why dont you show me how to do it. He got out of his car as he said it. So i got in and moved it to the front of his house no problem at all. As i walked away i said, told you not to use so much gas and the right gear.

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Have to say Chris most people have no real idea of how to dive in the snow.

Last night a guy across the road got stuck. As he tried to sort it out, all that was happening was he was sliding backwards towards my car. His family were trying to push him away from my car.

I went out to offer help. He didnt like the fact that i offered. So he said "ok then clever clogs why dont you show me how to do it. He got out of his car as he said it. So i got in and moved it to the front of his house no problem at all. As i walked away i said, told you not to use so much gas and the right gear.

:rolleyes:

When driving in snow it is definitely a case of less is more. Too many people when they lose traction just press even harder on the loud pedal.

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:rolleyes:

When driving in snow it is definitely a case of less is more. Too many people when they lose traction just press even harder on the loud pedal.

To true.

Hardly any gas, second gear and just get the car rocking backwards and forwards and out of the rote he was in and away i went.

The big trouble in this country is, we dont get enough snow. People dont gear up for it or know how to deal with it.

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