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Saint Billinge

Make-do-and-mend: is it a thing of the past?

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In our neck of the woods it was either make do with what you have or mend. As for people enjoying luxuries on benefits, I not that bad of a person to think it applies to everyone. There are many decent people out there who scrimp and save to enjoy simple pleasure in life. I would have thought Chris that you knew me better!

Just one other point in that I was brought up in a very poor family, so do know what it's like. I once skipped a family wedding aged 14 because I only had my school uniform to wear.

I've also known it to be "make do and mend", as in 'make do with what you have rather than buy new and mend broken items rather than buy replacements'; and I've known it as that for almost 60 years.

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Do we really see people on benefits doing all of those things, or is it something we are told is happening by politicians and newspapers with a particular agenda to push? :dry:

I'm actually glad that despite our current economic woes we are generally not seeing a repeat of the extreme hardships that occurred during the great depression of the 1930s. That's due in large part to the existence of things like the minimum wage, plus of course the welfare state and the NHS, which are now gradually being dismantled before our very eyes under the cloak of austerity. Hugely ironic considering the welfare state and the NHS were actually created during an era of austerity when, perhaps (no, definitely), our leaders had higher aims and ambitions for us all.

Not quibbling with the general meaning, John, but "austerity" is an odd label for the immediate post-war period. Undoubtedly, it was a time of few luxuries (so similar), but it was also a time of great optimism, surely? The war had just ended, things were getting better. Let's face it, they couldn't get much worse. There was plenty of employment, too. After the war, our leaders certainly had "higher aims and ambitions for us all". Perhaps that is what is really missing now?

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I've also known it to be "make do and mend", as in 'make do with what you have rather than buy new and mend broken items rather than buy replacements'; and I've known it as that for almost 60 years.

Make, do and mend is a slogan from WW2. Make and mend is a naval thing. They aren't the same.

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Make, do and mend is a slogan from WW2. Make and mend is a naval thing. They aren't the same.

Ah! Clarification. Thanks for that.

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Make, do and mend is a slogan from WW2. Make and mend is a naval thing. They aren't the same.

well played

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Not quibbling with the general meaning, John, but "austerity" is an odd label for the immediate post-war period. Undoubtedly, it was a time of few luxuries (so similar), but it was also a time of great optimism, surely? The war had just ended, things were getting better. Let's face it, they couldn't get much worse. There was plenty of employment, too. After the war, our leaders certainly had "higher aims and ambitions for us all". Perhaps that is what is really missing now?

I recall the fifties playing hide 'n' seek, marbles, tick rugby, football and cricket. There was never a case of throwing things away because money was tight and so couldn't afford much. Grandad grew veg and spuds and my brother brought home rabbits shot on the farm. As a young lad, Saturdays would be spent going to the launderette with my auntie and then a bath at another relative's house. Most of the family did work with employment widely available. Apart from my very earlier life, there was still much enjoyment full of laughter. As for holiday's, a friend of the family let us use their caravan in North Wales. Most clothes were hand-me-downs. Just after the wedding that I skipped, my relatives put together enough money to buy me a new coat. So chuffed was I, I walked up and down the street showing it off. :D

No doubt, some people struggling today will look back to tell a new generation how it was in the past, be it 'coloured' up. I know my grandparents used to tell me about their struggles.

Today, I still don't like throwing things away and so try my best to find a good home for stuff no longer needed (charities, relatives, friends etc),

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What SB has described was very much like my life growing up in the 80s. Has life really changed that much or is it just perception?

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What SB has described was very much like my life growing up in the 80s. Has life really changed that much or is it just perception?

As a matter of fact, there is a shortage of allotments that are now in demand. Wasn't there an initiative asking people to let others use any spare land?. Even today, people still use launderettes, but not as much in the fifties. Kids still play outdoors, whilst others cannot be dragged away from computer games. Our marbles/stonies were obtained from Pilkington Brothers who discarded the glass bottle tops on a tip. Some friends were 'rich' enough to buy the coloured marbles bought from good old Woolworths, and only came out on Sundays. :D Talking of Sundays, you now don't see many annual Church Walking Days

I do recall our bedrooms having gas mantles due to no electricity upstairs. I don't suppose you will see these today, unless in a museum. Perhaps I'm getting old enough to go in a museum! :D

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I took a camera lens into a shop to be repaired last week and it was going to cost £80.00, the same lens brand new was £120.00 and a better quality reconditioned lens was £80.00.

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What SB has described was very much like my life growing up in the 80s. Has life really changed that much or is it just perception?

Yes. me too.

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I got a lovely bicycle off a skip years ago. An ultra-lightweight job that had been assembled from all sorts of quality parts from different manufacturers. God knows why it had been chucked away, but it was a skip in a posh bit of North London. All it needed to be roadworthy again was some new brake blocks and a wash.

I rode it for ages 'til some dozy driver launched me across his car bonnet on the Edgware Road. It was never quite the same again, so I gave it to a friend who could use the undamaged bits.

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I got a lovely bicycle off a skip years ago. An ultra-lightweight job that had been assembled from all sorts of quality parts from different manufacturers. God knows why it had been chucked away, but it was a skip in a posh bit of North London. All it needed to be roadworthy again was some new brake blocks and a wash.

I rode it for ages 'til some dozy driver launched me across his car bonnet on the Edgware Road. It was never quite the same again, so I gave it to a friend who could use the undamaged bits.

Did you survive unscathed? Speaking of recycling, our waste bin is only filled up to a quarter weekly because we recycle. Next door, theirs is full because they cannot be bothered.

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Did you survive unscathed? Speaking of recycling, our waste bin is only filled up to a quarter weekly because we recycle. Next door, theirs is full because they cannot be bothered.

I wasn't hurt, thankfully.

As for recycling, the council supplied plastic crates for paper/card/etc. a few years ago, but they were all nicked within a month. I do take stuff to the recycling bins at the supermarket on a weekend, but am not as diligent as I should be.

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Re recycling:

We try our best, but in the winter (and our most recent summer for that matter) I have ended up chucking all the cardboard etc in the bin as our council don't collect it as a separate recyclable item and if we try and save it to take to the tip for recycling it ends up a soggy smelly mess which I don't really want mucking my car up.

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Re recycling:

We try our best, but in the winter (and our most recent summer for that matter) I have ended up chucking all the cardboard etc in the bin as our council don't collect it as a separate recyclable item and if we try and save it to take to the tip for recycling it ends up a soggy smelly mess which I don't really want mucking my car up.

We are allowed to put our cardboard in the green bin with garden waste. There is a pink bag for plastic, blue for papers and a plastic box for bottles and cans. Other rubbish goes in the brown bin. Over in Wigan, I think they have five wheelie bins.

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Over in Wigan, I think they have five wheelie bins.

That's not a lot for a town the size of Wigan. Maybe there's not a lot of waste there. ;)

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Over in Wigan, I think they have five wheelie bins.

That's nothing - in Twickenham, they can fill an 80,000 seater stadium with complete garbage several times a year. :P

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That's not a lot for a town the size of Wigan. Maybe there's not a lot of waste there. ;)

But many wasters! :rolleyes: Better not tell my Wigan relatives!

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We are allowed to put our cardboard in the green bin with garden waste. There is a pink bag for plastic, blue for papers and a plastic box for bottles and cans. Other rubbish goes in the brown bin. Over in Wigan, I think they have five wheelie bins.

We just get a green box for bottles & cans and a blue bag for paper. So the cardboard and plastic is down to us to sort out ourselves/chuck in the bin.

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You can tell the oldies on here when they reminisce about finding bikes left in a skip, nowadays if it isn't bolted down (actually, no that doesn't matter) then it's probably being "transited" away by jolly nice fellows who did it without even needing to be asked.

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You can tell the oldies on here when they reminisce about finding bikes left in a skip, nowadays if it isn't bolted down (actually, no that doesn't matter) then it's probably being "transited" away by jolly nice fellows who did it without even needing to be asked.

I found that bike less than 10 years ago, BTW.

Mind you, in some areas, if you need to get rid of anything metal and can't be bothered to go to the dump, leaving it outside will mean it disappears within the half hour. Quite convenient, last time our business moved premises and we needed to get rid of a load of old filing cabinets.

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I found that bike less than 10 years ago, BTW.

Mind you, in some areas, if you need to get rid of anything metal and can't be bothered to go to the dump, leaving it outside will mean it disappears within the half hour. Quite convenient, last time our business moved premises and we needed to get rid of a load of old filing cabinets.

Correct. I left a gas fire that was unrepairable outside the house and it was gone inside 10 minutes.

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Bury council have furnished us with wheelie bins for garden and food, cardboard and glass and plastic recycling in addition to general waste. The recycling bins are collected once a month and the normal bin every two weeks.

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Back in the early 20th century, Winston Churchill spoke of tackling poverty, Today, politicians, church leaders and charities still highlight the need to tackle poverty. You can listen to debates and arguments on and on, but is it really as serious as it's said? Do you know anyone people living in poverty? I know people who are struggling but do get by.

Speaking of the fifties/sixties, did anyone play matchbox rugby? Such a simple game but endless hours of enjoyment.

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