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Bleep1673

The Boat Race

The Boat Race  

37 members have voted

  1. 1. Who do you think will win?

    • Oxford
      1
    • Cambridge
      2
    • Dead Heat / Draw
      1
    • Couldn't Care Less
      33


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As long as the dark blue rabble sink like a stone, I have no particular preference. ;)

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To be honest, I actually quite enjoy it.

Compared to an international regatta on a still lake, where the boats stay in lanes and go in a straight line, this is a twisting course against the current and without lanes, which adds another tactical dimension.

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I once worked at Oxford. The percentage of arrogant stuck up students was way too high. Trouble is, Cambridge will be no different.

Seems to me that:

- Both places hire rowing mercenaries by offering them dubious-value degree courses.

- The non-mercenaries will almost certainly have learnt the sport at top public schools.

- If it's so important how come the average sports fan in the street can't tell you who won last year.

- It's an anachronistic exercise in watching commoners touching their collective forelock towards the upper classes.

Still, at least it generates tourist income.

I think rowing must be a fantastic sport to take part in or to watch, but this is one race I definitely won't be watching.

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I once worked at Oxford. The percentage of arrogant stuck up students was way too high. Trouble is, Cambridge will be no different.

Seems to me that:

- Both places hire rowing mercenaries by offering them dubious-value degree courses.

- The non-mercenaries will almost certainly have learnt the sport at top public schools.

- If it's so important how come the average sports fan in the street can't tell you who won last year.

- It's an anachronistic exercise in watching commoners touching their collective forelock towards the upper classes.

Still, at least it generates tourist income.

I think rowing must be a fantastic sport to take part in or to watch, but this is one race I definitely won't be watching.

That's quite an interesting response. It's not that you're not interested, but that you're actively antagonistic to the event.

I find it interesting because a lot of people, in my experience, are actively antagonistic to Rugby League, obviously for different reasons.

The problem in our case is that a lot of the antagonism to our sport is found in people in influential positions.

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Drunken posh totty shouting at boats. What's not to love?

All of that sentence? Maybe it's just me, but I get irritated by 'posh' women (and posh men for that matter). The boat race is one of those things that annoys me intensely, probably for no good reason. I would, however, watch the BBC coverage if someone threw John Inverdale into the Thames.

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All of that sentence? Maybe it's just me, but I get irritated by 'posh' women (and posh men for that matter). The boat race is one of those things that annoys me intensely, probably for no good reason. I would, however, watch the BBC coverage if someone threw John Inverdale into the Thames.

This.

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Yes...but isn't that the braying hangers on?. Most of the rowers seem to be pros from the US.

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All of that sentence? Maybe it's just me, but I get irritated by 'posh' women (and posh men for that matter). The boat race is one of those things that annoys me intensely, probably for no good reason. I would, however, watch the BBC coverage if someone threw John Inverdale into the Thames.

Hmmm ... I think we can all agree that the BBC's coverage of anything would be vastly improved by the throwing of John Inverdale into the Thames.

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Hmmm ... I think we can all agree that the BBC's coverage of anything would be vastly improved by the throwing of John Inverdale into the Thames.

Isn't it traditional to do that to the cox ;)

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Hmmm ... I think we can all agree that the BBC's coverage of anything would be vastly improved by the throwing of John Inverdale into the Thames.

It's not the throwing in that's important, it's the holding under.

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No interest in it. Like others, I have a massive chip on my shoulder about the privileged upper class.

Of course, and as you well know, not everyone at Oxford is a member of the privileged upper class.

The Boat Race was a nice excuse to get drunk when I was an undergrad, but not fussed now. Can't recall who won it last year, and doubt I'll be watching it this year.

One thing I've always found odd is why people with no connection to either Uni support one side or the other? I can see the human drama of the event - it's bloody tough stuff, and those boys genuinely train hard for it and sacrifice a lot - but actively supporting one boat seems very odd to me.

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Of course, and as you well know, not everyone at Oxford is a member of the privileged upper class.

In 2010 Oxford had 11.5% of its intake coming from working-class families. Cambridge had 12.6%. The figures have barely changed since.

So no, not everyone, but a significant majority come from the privileged classes.

I'm with Sev on this one.

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In 2010 Oxford had 11.5% of its intake coming from working-class families. Cambridge had 12.6%. The figures have barely changed since.

So no, not everyone, but a significant majority come from the privileged classes.

I'm with Sev on this one.

How are those class war figures arrived at?it seems that for example about 45 percent of last years Oxford intake came from public/private schools. 35 percent from comps etc. how does one define working class in that context . And yes I'm with Sevy too on this

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In 2010 Oxford had 11.5% of its intake coming from working-class families. Cambridge had 12.6%. The figures have barely changed since.

So no, not everyone, but a significant majority come from the privileged classes.

I'm with Sev on this one.

At Oxford there's a huge gulf between the Eton educated wan kers who find their fun burning £20 notes in front of homeless people and everybody else.

I was in the 11.5%, as were some of my friends including my wife, so I know a little about this. I'm sorry to tell you that the majority of undergrads at Oxford are the children of rather boring parents. Doctors, provincial solicitors and the like. Good people, certainly not "working class", but hardly "upper class" and I think "privileged" is stretching it a bit.

If Oxford is anything it is middle class to it's boots.

And believe me, being in that 11.5% gives you a deep and lasting insight into the class structure of British society.

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In 2010 Oxford had 11.5% of its intake coming from working-class families. Cambridge had 12.6%. The figures have barely changed since.

So no, not everyone, but a significant majority come from the privileged classes.

I'm with Sev on this one.

To further disappoint you, not once in the four years I spent at Oxford did anybody connected to the University make any reference whatsoever to my belonging to the 11.5% in a good or bad fashion. I genuinely think that noone cared about my background. The only people who ever did mention it were the odd Bullingdon type, who I tended to regard with condescension anyway. No love lost there.

In my opinion, the biggest barrier to working class people going to Oxford is the simple reluctance of working class people to apply. I had a number of friends who easily were bright enough to go, but didn't bother applying because they thought it wasn't for them. Their choice, and their loss I feel. That's a tough nut to crack I think.

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In 2010 Oxford had 11.5% of its intake coming from working-class families. Cambridge had 12.6%. The figures have barely changed since.

Just to expand on this further. In 2012, 28% of applicants to Oxford went to Comprehensives. 26% of accepted candidates did. Not a big difference.

Overall 60% of applicants and 56% of successful applicants went to state schools of various types.

Interesting facts on this here:

http://www.ox.ac.uk/about_the_university/facts_and_figures/undergraduate_admissions_statistics/school_type.html

If you want to go to Oxford, it really helps if you actually fill in the forms and turn up for the interview.

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