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Bleep1673

The Boat Race

The Boat Race   37 members have voted

  1. 1. Who do you think will win?

    • Oxford
      1
    • Cambridge
      2
    • Dead Heat / Draw
      1
    • Couldn't Care Less
      33

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65 posts in this topic

if they did it on rowing machines that were hooked up to the national grid i'd be fine with it.

its harmless enough i guess

and i think rowing is a great participant sport

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There is another twist to this.

There are two things to think about when applying to Oxford. The college and the subject.

Some subjects, like English, attract huge numbers of applicants. The ratio of applicants to places can be 100+. Others, like Chemistry, can be 5-6 applicants per place. I read Chemistry, completely unwittingly.

Some colleges, like Lady Margaret Hall, are undersubscribed and it is easier to get in there. Others, like Balliol, Christ Church or St Johns have many more applicants. Again, completely unwittingly, I applied to St Johns.

There's a game you have to play to maximise your chances if you really want to get into Oxford. Being working class, I didn't play it - I just turned up and talked my way in.

I think that working class kids don't apply to Oxford enough, and they don't apply smartly enough.

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and i think rowing is a great participant sport

Back to the thread - yes. Great for the people doing it, dull for anyone watching.

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To further disappoint you, not once in the four years I spent at Oxford did anybody connected to the University make any reference whatsoever to my belonging to the 11.5% in a good or bad fashion. I genuinely think that noone cared about my background. The only people who ever did mention it were the odd Bullingdon type, who I tended to regard with condescension anyway. No love lost there.

I got to know some students when I was there in the 70's, and had a friend who, after his normal work, worked an evening shift in a college kitchen. I went along once to a college disco and we were treated like pondlife.

I was in lodgings with a lad who was doing a postgrad law qualification (I now occasionally see his name in the papers as a barrister). This lad was from a middle class background and had been to Oxford as an undergraduate. He said that it wasn't active condescension from public schoolboy students that was the problem, it was the cost of the extra-curricular social life that couldn't be met rom a grant.

On a similar theme, again in the 1970's, I had a friend whose brother did a degree and then joined the RAF to train as a flying crew officer. The training costs were so much that, after three years, he had to walk away or sign on for 22 years. He left because the social lifestyle couldn't be met by his salary.

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Back to the thread - yes. Great for the people doing it, dull for anyone watching.

What puzzles me is how the public schools and Oxbridge took over a sport that was originated by Thames watermen. The other thing is why the fascination with a race between these two particular universities? Same wtih the "Varsity " Union game - which apparently subsides much Oxbridge sport. The other thing that bugs me is why is Oxbridge cricket considered "First Class" when all other University cricket isn't - and why do the counties still play fixtures against Oxbridge.

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What puzzles me is how the public schools and Oxbridge took over a sport that was originated by Thames watermen.

The regulation of and codifying of a lot of sports came from public and grammar schools and universities............... The people from those backgrounds had the influence and the time.

You can see rowing clubs and races taking place in various places around the British Isles on the sea and inland. Lots of the clubs are quite mixed socially. The nearest one to me is at Hollingworth Lake and is hardly public school etc. I've taken part in rowing races in Ireland on the sea-absolutely knackering. Give me a lake, or a river anytime.

Rowing now has a programme to recruit people of suitable physical attributes who may have never rowed with the aim of strengthening and deepening the national squad. A bit like the old Communist government approach......

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[/size]

I got to know some students when I was there in the 70's, and had a friend who, after his normal work, worked an evening shift in a college kitchen. I went along once to a college disco and we were treated like pondlife.

I was in lodgings with a lad who was doing a postgrad law qualification (I now occasionally see his name in the papers as a barrister). This lad was from a middle class background and had been to Oxford as an undergraduate. He said that it wasn't active condescension from public schoolboy students that was the problem, it was the cost of the extra-curricular social life that couldn't be met rom a grant.

I can tell you that picture bears no resemblance to the life I lived at Oxford in the mid 90s.

Of course, there were extra-curricular things that I couldn't afford to do. I got around that by not doing them and doing something else instead. It was fine.

I can't actually remember an ex-public schoolboy treating me with condescension and if they had I would have told them where to stick it. You'll find idiots everywhere.

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[/size]

I got to know some students when I was there in the 70's, and had a friend who, after his normal work, worked an evening shift in a college kitchen. I went along once to a college disco and we were treated like pondlife.

One of the girls who worked in the college kitchen came to a college disco (known, excruciatingly, as a "bop") once. She had no shortage of admirers and copped off with one of my mates. I have no recollection of anyone treating her like pondlife, and if anyone had they'd have been considered to be the ones at fault.

Sorry to disappoint all of you, but with the exception of literally no more than three or four people (who, interestingly were all heavily involved in OUCA) St Johns, Oxford in my day was a very egalitarian, open, friendly and welcoming place. I had no problems whatsoever coming from a working class background, had an absolute ball for four years, and made many lifelong friends.

I am happy to tell you of how disappointed I was by the poor quality of teaching and the surprisingly dismal academic side of life at Oxford if you like. That's a whole different thing.

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The other thing that bugs me is why is Oxbridge cricket considered "First Class" when all other University cricket isn't - and why do the counties still play fixtures against Oxbridge.

There are 4 first class university sides. Oxford (which includes both Oxford Unis), Cambridge (likewise includes Anglia Ruskin), Durham and Loughborough.

Why they are first class sides I don't know.

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One of the girls who worked in the college kitchen came to a college disco (known, excruciatingly, as a "bop") once. She had no shortage of admirers and copped off with one of my mates. I have no recollection of anyone treating her like pondlife, and if anyone had they'd have been considered to be the ones at fault.

Yes, that was the problem at the disco I went to. There were very few (none?) girl students at the college and they relied on townie non-students girls attending for free. The male students were scared that any of the girls would prefer to get off with one of our number in preference to them.

Hence, we were always last to get served at the bar, and never with a smile. What chance did my mate and his brother have of kicking off about it; they'd have lost their part-time jobs.

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There are 4 first class university sides. Oxford (which includes both Oxford Unis), Cambridge (likewise includes Anglia Ruskin), Durham and Loughborough.

Why they are first class sides I don't know.

Loughborough probably makes sense, as it is THE sports-oriented University. The other three, based on historical prestige, I'd guess.

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I am one of those who say I couldnt care less,but I always watch it all if its on when i'm in :D .I always want the team thats not the favoured one

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I am one of those who say I couldnt care less,but I always watch it all if its on when i'm in :D .I always want the team thats not the favoured one

That's because you follow the Rhinos.

B)

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Loughborough probably makes sense, as it is THE sports-oriented University. The other three, based on historical prestige, I'd guess.

Not sure how it works but 2 of Bradford/Leeds UCCE's matches in 2012 were apparently first class.

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And, in fact, Yorkshire's first First Class match of the 'summer' is next Friday against what is now called Leeds Bradford MCCU.

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One summer term when I was at Bradford University, the rugby season had ended and my friend and I decided we fancied a game of cricket. We put our name down on the cricket club's section of the noticeboard and were picked for the third team.

Obviously, cricket coincided with exams and more and more people dropped out. Eventually, we were reserves for the first team.

We weren't members of the cricket club and no one had seen us play. Good job, because I was pretty useless at cricket and I don't think he was much better.

We didn't risk putting our names down afterwards.

:D

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And, in fact, Yorkshire's first First Class match of the 'summer' is next Friday against what is now called Leeds Bradford MCCU.

Aye. Cricket has worked on developing its university links, centres of excellence and all that.

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Yes, that was the problem at the disco I went to. There were very few (none?) girl students at the college and they relied on townie non-students girls attending for free. The male students were scared that any of the girls would prefer to get off with one of our number in preference to them.

Hence, we were always last to get served at the bar, and never with a smile. What chance did my mate and his brother have of kicking off about it; they'd have lost their part-time jobs.

So they were treating you like pondlife because they didn't want you nicking the best women? That isn't snobbery, it's just the way things are. A young man needs to get his little fellah wet from time to time and he won't want you getting in the way.

By the time I arrived the college had let women in and about a third of the undergraduates were women. I think it's pretty much half and half now. I wouldn't have gone there if it had been all-male.

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So they were treating you like pondlife because they didn't want you nicking the best women? That isn't snobbery, it's just the way things are. A young man needs to get his little fellah wet from time to time and he won't want you getting in the way.

They knew exactly who my mates were and still treated them like pondlife. Plus, they relied on the townie staff to publicise the event and encourage townie girls to come along in the first place. It wasn't a case of us 'getting in their way'; they feared they couldn't handle the competition or comparison.

As recall, the organisers numbered about ten with maybe 6 chins between them.

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Off topic, sort of, but one of my mates as a kid failed his 11 plus in 1957 and failed his 0 levels in 1962. Re-sat, night school, Lancaster uni and is now a Professor of Astronomy at Oxford Uni.. And is all over TV like a rash.

Re the Boat Race..braying upper class supporters.how are they different to abuse- chanting 'lower class' soccer fans?

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Off topic, sort of, but one of my mates as a kid failed his 11 plus in 1957 and failed his 0 levels in 1962. Re-sat, night school, Lancaster uni and is now a Professor of Astronomy at Oxford Uni.. And is all over TV like a rash.

Re the Boat Race..braying upper class supporters.how are they different to abuse- chanting 'lower class' soccer fans?

one is high spirits yhr other is hooliganism

I do agree with your point though: there's a kind of reverse snobbery going on here. IMHO to judge people on the basis of their social background is offside.

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Off topic, sort of, but one of my mates as a kid failed his 11 plus in 1957 and failed his 0 levels in 1962. Re-sat, night school, Lancaster uni and is now a Professor of Astronomy at Oxford Uni.. And is all over TV like a rash.

Re the Boat Race..braying upper class supporters.how are they different to abuse- chanting 'lower class' soccer fans?

The difference is in the noises they make, braying may be annoying but is not necessarily abusive or targetted at an individual, group or race. "lower class" football chants of the type you allude to are frequently abusive, homophobic, racist and aggressive.

It is the intention behind the chanting / braying that is the offensive part not the demographic of the chanters / brayers.

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one is high spirits yhr other is hooliganism

I do agree with your point though: there's a kind of reverse snobbery going on here. IMHO to judge people on the basis of their social background is offside.

You're not wrong there. And, as rugby league fans, who have complained in the past of the negative stereotyping we sometimes receive based on the supposed class our our supports, we should know better.

I've said it before and I'll say it again; there is nothing wrong with being upper class. Being an upper class ###### on the other hand... it's the ###### part that's objectionable.

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My youngest son has just joined the Leeds Uni fencing club (another perceived elitist sport),they are some of the most welcoming people i have met.

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Isn't it traditional to do that to the cox ;)

Well Inverdale is a type of cox. i.e a pr1ck

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