Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Futtocks

Tennis

140 posts in this topic

Sometimes I just shake my head when I read some posts on here...

Glad it's not just me then! Thought I'd missed something!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just watched the replay. That took real talent and balls. Brilliant.

I noticed how prominent Richard Lewis was. ...good job RL got rid of him eh?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done to the BRITISH no1, Andy Murray.

Maybe he'll dedicate his win the the dead in his Dunblane school, or maybe not.

What on earth? ????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done to the BRITISH no1, Andy Murray.

Maybe he'll dedicate his win the the dead in his Dunblane school, or maybe not.

Maybe it's up to him how and when he chooses to talk about or acknowledge being at Dunblane. Just as it's up to every child who was there who is now an adult how they live their life today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The guy did also donate all his Queens winnings (about 73k) to cancer research at the Royal Marsden.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done Andy Murray..  Without reservation and unconditionally. Just remember, he has just beaten the player justifiably ranked number one in the world. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 7th day of the 7th month, 77 years after the last Brit Man won Wimbledon Singles.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always thought he'd win a couple of US and Aussie Opens, but the pressure of Wimbledon would be too much for him ( he'll never win in France), so he has shown real strength of character to do this. 

 

Also, what's the sudden deal whereby if you don't donate all of your winnings to charity, you're worse than Hitler?  He won the money, and if he wants to burn it live on centre court, that's his choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always thought he'd win a couple of US and Aussie Opens, but the pressure of Wimbledon would be too much for him ( he'll never win in France), so he has shown real strength of character to do this. 

 

Also, what's the sudden deal whereby if you don't donate all of your winnings to charity, you're worse than Hitler?  He won the money, and if he wants to burn it live on centre court, that's his choice.

He can get some tips on million-pound burning from another Scot, Bill Drummond of the KLF/K Foundation, who famously torched a load of cash for reasons that few can understand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe it's up to him how and when he chooses to talk about or acknowledge being at Dunblane. Just as it's up to every child who was there who is now an adult how they live their life today.

 

True. If anyone is desperate to know his thoughts on Dunblane, it's covered in the excellent "Behind the racquet" documentary which is repeated on BBC One tonight at 9pm.

 

Anyway, well done to the guy. He's just a bloke who wants to play tennis, and he plays it well and has pretty much ignored all his critics. Long may that continue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True. If anyone is desperate to know his thoughts on Dunblane, it's covered in the excellent "Behind the racquet" documentary which is repeated on BBC One tonight at 9pm.

 

Anyway, well done to the guy. He's just a bloke who wants to play tennis, and he plays it well and has pretty much ignored all his critics. Long may that continue.

 

I'll try and catch that.

 

And, yes, I do like that he's still somewhat rough around the edges media-wise and let's his on-court results do the talking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always thought he'd win a couple of US and Aussie Opens, but the pressure of Wimbledon would be too much for him ( he'll never win in France), so he has shown real strength of character to do this. 

 

Also, what's the sudden deal whereby if you don't donate all of your winnings to charity, you're worse than Hitler?  He won the money, and if he wants to burn it live on centre court, that's his choice.

 

I always feared that the pressure of Wimbledon would be a problem, but he does seem to have become mentally stronger. It will be interesting to see how well he does now that the "first British champion in 70-odd years" barrier has fallen. He can go into grand slam tournaments concentrating soley on his performance rather than having the added burden of creating history.

By the way, why won't he win in France (I don't really know anything about tennis)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 7th day of the 7th month, 77 years after the last Brit won Wimbledon.....

 

A Brit won Wimbledon last year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lisicki should take some comfort from the fact that, towards the end, she loosened up and started playing decently, if not brilliantly. Another thing she can take from it is a quick look at Bartoli's first Grand Slam final, where she suffered an even more one-sided beating. If Lisicki gets to another Slam final, she'll handle the occasion much better. Very few players (Boris Becker is an exception) win their first Slam final.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always feared that the pressure of Wimbledon would be a problem, but he does seem to have become mentally stronger. It will be interesting to see how well he does now that the "first British champion in 70-odd years" barrier has fallen. He can go into grand slam tournaments concentrating soley on his performance rather than having the added burden of creating history.

By the way, why won't he win in France (I don't really know anything about tennis)?

He's (relatively) not very good on clay I believe.  It's to do with the type of game he plays., it doesn't go well with the slower surface. Someone who's knows tennis should be able to fill in the details hopefully. 

 

Edit: to add relatively

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By the way, why won't he win in France (I don't really know anything about tennis)?

While Andy honed his game in Spain, which is a stronghold for clay court Tennis, his style suits the faster, harder courts more. I think he could win the French Open, but it would be unlikely and very difficult for him, as there are so many clay court specialists in today's game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Brit won Wimbledon last year.

Changed it GJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It is hard to think of a greater evil that could visit a community than the mass murder of a group of its five year olds - and the person charged with their care - in the place where they were supposed to be safest. We will all have our own memories of that day - of sitting with a colleague as he desparately tried to find out whether his niece was safe; of driving home, just to be with my wife and to watch the television news to find out what was happening; of stopping at my son's school gate just so that I could see him and his five year old classmates play in the lunch break, oblivious of what was happening not too far away.

What trauma the town of Dunblane itself went through is almost beyond imagination, but I do remember the very public declaration of the school's headmaster that the recovery to some sort of normality would start when the school reopened after a week's break. That didn't mean that there wouldn't be time for mourning, despair, outright hatred of the perpretrator, and even mutual suspicion and other destructive emotions, but life in the town would go on.

To us, Dunblane had always been a wonderful place for a Sunday afternoon out. A walk beside the river, a play in the park, if we were feeling energetic a saunter into the Laigh Hills, the return past the cathedral and, to finish, a chippy supper! That innocence ended for us, and we didn't return for ages. It felt as though we would be intruding on private grief. This is where something unspeakable had happened, and no longer somewhere where you could visit just to enjoy yourself.

Gradually, though, people get on with the business of living, never forgetting, but no longer letting tragedy get in the way of that business. Personally, I returned through participating in orienteering events in and around the town organised by that other sporting success associatd with the area, Forth Valley Orienteers. It was during an urban event last autumn that my course took me through what seemed to be a school complex, but it wasn't until I was stood at the memorial garden in the playground that I realised where I was. A quick moment of horror, regret, but then acceptance that the town had moved on (as I, then, quickly did).

Andy Murray, and his progress as a brilliant talent on the tennis circuit, has just been the highest profile example of the town's recovery. Hopefully he has provided the first thing that will enter people's minds when the word Dunblane is spoken from now on. Hopefully, too, there will come a day when he is known as the international tennis champion from just an ordinary, if beautiful, small town in central Scotland. And that the press - which Andy is rightly wary of after past experiences - will stop asking him about, and linking him to, the events that he was almost too young to remember.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While Andy honed his game in Spain, which is a stronghold for clay court Tennis, his style suits the faster, harder courts more. I think he could win the French Open, but it would be unlikely and very difficult for him, as there are so many clay court specialists in today's game.

 

A look at the list of winners of the French Open reveals names of specialists that rarely succeed with any frequency at other Slams. Rafa Nadal being the obvious exception. Federer, even at the height of his success only managed to win once at Paris. The surface requires a completely different style of play, not suited to Murray's game, However, he has a small chance due primarily to his general all round tennis ability, which would mean he would reach the last 8 or even 4 before coming up against a real clay court specialist.

 

Anyway, well done Murray, Wimbledon is important in the British (and world's) sporting psyche and it represents a genuine achievement, and gives him real sporting immortality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A look at the list of winners of the French Open reveals names of specialists that rarely succeed with any frequency at other Slams. Rafa Nadal being the obvious exception. Federer, even at the height of his success only managed to win once at Paris. The surface requires a completely different style of play, not suited to Murray's game, However, he has a small chance due primarily to his general all round tennis ability, which would mean he would reach the last 8 or even 4 before coming up against a real clay court specialist.

 

Anyway, well done Murray, Wimbledon is important in the British (and world's) sporting psyche and it represents a genuine achievement, and gives him real sporting immortality.

 

So does this mean that it is very unlikely that someone will win all four grand slams in a year?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So does this mean that it is very unlikely that someone will win all four grand slams in a year?

With a favourable draw, Murray or Djokovic could, but it would be a massive task. A fully fit and on form Serena Williams could do it in the woman's game. Outside singles, the (frankly amazing) Bryan brothers currently hold all four Grand Slam men's doubles titles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With a favourable draw, Murray or Djokovic could, but it would be a massive task. A fully fit and on form Serena Williams could do it in the woman's game. Outside singles, the (frankly amazing) Bryan brothers currently hold all four Grand Slam men's doubles titles.

 

And the Olympic title.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



Rugby League World - April 2017

League Express - Mon 10th April 2017