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The Daddy

Rangi Chase hurt by 'discrimination' over England call up

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Moderating note:  1 post deleted.  There is no excuse for insulting a player's family, even in jest.

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The fact is that there are better English qualified half backs that should have been chosen ahead of him.

 

The fact that he's not English is therefore irrelevant, although I do understand the sentiment.

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1. Does he meet the qualification criteria?

2. Ha he been judges good enough to play by those who have the authority,  power and qualifications to make such decisions?

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how can he play for england when he cant even change club sides because of visa rules ????

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how can he play for england when he cant even change club sides because of visa rules ????

This, he can't even get a Visa to switch jobs i this country and gain permanent employment. 

Whatever rule there is which made him eligible for England is a sham.

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I don't remember people complaining this much when Maurie Fa'asavalu played for Britain. Chase has an English wife and child, considers England his home and wants to play for England. If he is good enough I see no problem.

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Well, I for one wish him all the best and I hope he gets his hands on that World Cup at the end of the year and goes down in history for England RL.

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He qualifies for England under the rules, debate the rules if you want but it's not his fault. This is modern sport like it or lump it.

 

He is also a very good dynamic player that can produce things not many players can, he's also chosen to play for the country that has treat him well and given him opportunities in the game he plays. Good luck to the lad.

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I don't remember people complaining this much when Maurie Fa'asavalu played for Britain. Chase has an English wife and child, considers England his home and wants to play for England. If he is good enough I see no problem.

They did you know

I was watching him play and had to ask some stewards to step in thanks to the frankly racist comments from some so called fans at one game and the same arguments against Chase playing were levelled then too

Personally I have utterly no problem with him qualifying for England, thems the rules all international sides play to so if he can do the job why not.

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how can he play for england when he cant even change club sides because of visa rules ????

 

 

Because working Visas have a different set of criteria to national sport qualification.

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I don't remember people complaining this much when Maurie Fa'asavalu played for Britain. Chase has an English wife and child, considers England his home and wants to play for England. If he is good enough I see no problem.

I've probably complained as much for Chase as I did for Fa'asavalu, not a lot and certainly not ranting. And to me these are slightly separate in that Chase changed, while in my view with Fa'asavalu it was "what's wrong with representing Samoa?".

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I might have to severely bite my lip if the Burgii play for Australia after they get residency. :dry:

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The joke is that you only have to play 3 seasons in one country to then claim to be a national of that country. I have family working in different parts of the world. Yes they enjoy working there & their life but after only 3 years, it isn't that long. They are still very much English as when they left, even thought they respect & live as part of that country's way of life.

Living for 10% of your life in a country is not long at all.

The residency rule should be 10 years or at least to make it respectable a third of your life.

If he was really English, he would of never played for the exiles, I would of thought he would of found it very strange to play against the country you class yourself as, love & to live in for your rest of your life as you very much would not be a exile.

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The joke is that you only have to play 3 seasons in one country to then claim to be a national of that country. I have family working in different parts of the world. Yes they enjoy working there & their life but after only 3 years, it isn't that long. They are still very much English as when they left, even thought they respect & live as part of that country's way of life.

Living for 10% of your life in a country is not long at all.

The residency rule should be 10 years or at least to make it respectable a third of your life.

If he was really English, he would of never played for the exiles, I would of thought he would of found it very strange to play against the country you class yourself as, love & to live in for your rest of your life as you very much would not be a exile.

Ten years would just about prevent any senior player moving abroad and playing for that country.

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It would of worked for Robbie Paul,

3 years is just too short, and in that 3 years the player could only be living here in total of 2 years, while going back to his homeland in the off season

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Should the same apply to Englishmen such as Lee Briers, Kieron Cunningham, Danny Brough, Iestyn Harris etc?

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For the established nations yes. For the developing one that's a different, if you wish to improve the standard for them.

If England are picking an Englishman in Chase, then they are picking an Australian in Sam Burgess. If the same logic is applied

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Chase qualifies

The sole criterion for his selection should be based on his ability to play to the required standard not how 'English' he is

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Chase qualifies

The sole criterion for his selection should be based on his ability to play to the required standard not how 'English' he is

 

This viewpoint devalues international Rugby League completely, in my opinion.

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This viewpoint devalues international Rugby League completely, in my opinion.

How do these rules devalue to every other form of international competition as we?

or is it just RL that is especially devalued by them?

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I don't remember people complaining this much when Maurie Fa'asavalu played for Britain. Chase has an English wife and child, considers England his home and wants to play for England. If he is good enough I see no problem.

Err yes there was. I was one of them.

He may consider himself English but until he can drink 10 pints of Jaipur in one sesh and still walk home, and eats pork scratching, black pudding, and knows what Babbeesyedchipsanpeas is then he will always be a convict bread stealer

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Chase qualifies

The sole criterion for his selection should be based on his ability to play to the required standard not how 'English' he is

Well he shouldn't be playing by that logic then.

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Well he shouldn't be playing by that logic then.

That's up to the coach

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