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Wolford6

Tour de France 2013

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I'm travelling to Leigh tomorrow afternoon. Had to pick the time because of daughter - yes she does come before sport - but she would have left earlier if it wasn't for her love of her Uni BF and her need to see him for as long as possible - I know, I'm the same with Lee :))

 

So, I will no doubt miss the most dramatic events of double Alpe D'Heuz - the telly in the hotel best have it on, or we're off the pub

 

Run out of hats for Froome - he's is awesome

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Why did it have to rain as they tackle Alpe D'Heuz :(

 

I hope all the riders stay safe

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I think rain might help the riders going twice up Alpe d'Huez. It's got to be an easier task if the weather is cooller and the air is cleaner.

 

The course doesn't do Froome any favours though. Sky riders are unlikely to be with him on the second ascent. Good job for Froome that the stage finishes at the summit, because Contador can descend like a demon.

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The descending could be treacherous today though with the rain. Fingers crossed everyone comes home safe and sound.

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Team Sky have released two years of Chris Froome's data to L'Equipe in order to quash te doping allegations. L'Equipe gave it to a leading French sports scientist, and FDJ's consultant, who says the data from Froome's recent performance is 'coherent'.

http://www.itv.com/tourdefrance/news/froome-ready-to-race-all-the-way-to-paris/

I was surprised at the anti Froome signs on the Alpe d'Huez calling him a doper. Also a few people I spoke to swallowed the rumour that Froome wanted the stage shortened. It seems unless you are a French, Spanish or Italian rider then you don't deserve to win the TDF.

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 It seems unless you are a French, Spanish or Italian rider then you don't deserve to win the TDF.

 

I don't think it is a nationalist feeling that opposes the Anglophones. The thing that cycling traditionalists can't stand is the way Western technology and science has changed the training, preparation and recovery programmes. Riders no longer are separately purely by ability.

 

It's  comparable to the reason why traditional rugby union fans disparage rugby league, because professionalism has  meant that RU teams have recruited and adopted RL coaching, training and playing practices. Essentially, since then, the opportunities for the flair player in a given RU match have diminished ... just as they have in a given post-Superleague RL match.

 

In cycling and rugby, you can't halt progress. However, it is natural for we fans to revere the old-style characters that graced our sport.

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Wow, what a sprint and what a tour. Chuffed for Froome and Kittel, but shame that Omega Pharma Quickstep just weren't the lead out train that Highroad and Sky were to give Cav a chance. Quintana and Porte must be future tour winners. Bring on the Vuelta.

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I had a few quid on Kittel today. I thought he was exceptional value at 11/4.

 

Been a particularly enjoyable Tour this year IMO. Loved the grand finale too. 

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Unpleasant stuff.

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When was that? Utterly disgraceful...

Don't know when or where this took place. Watching the tour was a superb experience but there were a fair share of boozed up fans getting a little excited. At Alpe d'Huez we walked down to the switchbacks only to walk back and watch it in the town because we couldn't be doing with the rowdiness. Must say that on the whole the people couldn't have been nicer.

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Don't know when or where this took place. Watching the tour was a superb experience but there were a fair share of boozed up fans getting a little excited. At Alpe d'Huez we walked down to the switchbacks only to walk back and watch it in the town because we couldn't be doing with the rowdiness. Must say that on the whole the people couldn't have been nicer.

 

Interesting. The SKY employee showed a lot of restraint; not sure I would have showed the same.

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In his acceptance ceremony Froome showed what a dignified gentleman he is

The whole event was fantastic

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In his acceptance ceremony Froome showed what a dignified gentleman he is

The whole event was fantastic

"This is one yellow jersey that will stand the test of time"

Brilliant

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Thought the organisers did a real good job with the tour.

To arrange the Orica GreenEdge bus to get stuck under the gantry at the stage 1 finish with 15 minutes to go was a masterclass :)

Seriously, some great stages and fantastic mountain racing.

IMO I'd prefer a couple more time trials in place of the flat transit stages.

A longer. higher mountain time trial stage would be good, as well as a longer team time trial stage.

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I always thought Formula 1 was dull : one bloke staying in the front in no danger of losing for 3/4 hours solid.

In the TdF it's three weeks. :O

Impressive achievement of course, those guys are all hard as nails.

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I couldn't agree more. The whole thing is as dull as ditchwater.

 

It goes on for so long, it almost becomes a parody of itself by the time it is over.

All sport is like that if you dont understand whats going on

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I couldn't agree more. The whole thing is as dull as ditchwater.

 

It goes on for so long, it almost becomes a parody of itself by the time it is over.

really? obviously le tour is not just about he GC. what about the points race, or king of the mountains, or the stage win by a breakaway rider. the excitement of the time trials, or the tactics used by competing teams to get an advantage? or the huge pile ups at crucial stages of a race that throws everything up in the air? it may not be to everyone's taste, bu I wouldn't say it was dull!

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Really, well seeing as you seem to be suggesting that I am ignorant, why don't you do me a favour, and educate me?

 

 

Perhaps the  TdF could be compared to the English Premier League. Not every team can win it outright ... and the actual winner is only the head of his team, but there are other prizes on offer. Fans love their team and hope it can pick up other consolations.

 

The sprints are duels between different team's star men. There is an achievement for the big men in just getting round the Alps and Pyrenees. Some individuals are not great sprinters, time-triallers or climbers so their only chance of winning a stage is a breakaway. Other riders have a negligible chance of winning anything in a major tour, they spend their whole tour as domestiques, chasing down breakaways and acting as a windshield to slipstream the ride of their team leader. The spirit in the teams is fantastic; Phillipe Gilbert is the current world champion but he has just spent three weeks working as a domestique for two team members. Geraint Thomas broke his pelvis on day one, but completed the tour to help Froome win.

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Thought the organisers did a real good job with the tour.

To arrange the Orica GreenEdge bus to get stuck under the gantry at the stage 1 finish with 15 minutes to go was a masterclass :)

Seriously, some great stages and fantastic mountain racing.

IMO I'd prefer a couple more time trials in place of the flat transit stages.

A longer. higher mountain time trial stage would be good, as well as a longer team time trial stage.

 

Agreed. As for TT's replacing flat stages, you've got to give something to the sprinters to win. If I was the ASO I would have:

 

- 3 TT stages, 1 flat individual, 1 team TTs and 1 mountain TT. The mountain TT stage from this years tour was superb viewing although I would outlaw planned bike changes ala Froome.

 

- Get rid of intermediate sprints. The points jersey should be for the best spinter, i.e., Kittel, not for a sprinter who can cope with the hills. I love Sagan but his tactics this tour whilst very successful, made for a boring green jersey competition.

 

- Don't have flipping hard mountain stages one after the other. The Alpe d'Huez stage was epic, but the stages either side of these were boring as either the riders were saving themselves or were too knackered from the previous days efforts.

 

- Re-tarmac the champes elysees - alright this one is a bit pie in the sky but the finale to the most prestigious bike race in the world should not resemble Paris-Roubaix.

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I couldn't agree more. The whole thing is as dull as ditchwater.

 

It goes on for so long, it almost becomes a parody of itself by the time it is over.

 

Meh, you two like RL, what would you know about exciting sports :P

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Really, well seeing as you seem to be suggesting that I am ignorant, why don't you do me a favour, and educate me?

Grand tours are great,

On a mountain stage you (the team) get your leader, usually the best climber to the front and let him go, meanwhile one or two other team members hang back in the group, if a rival chases then you go with him a get in front to disrupt his climbing rhythm as much as possibile.

One these stages you can gain many minutes over a rival which can give you the overall victory.

And a others has said there are races within races,

The sprint teams are particularly impressive to watch as the tactics unfold as to who get the best finish in

I don't expect you to like cycle racing over night but try it in future with an eye on the tactics

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My favourite stages are when a breakaway survives and usually a lone rider from the breakaway wins (e.g., Riblon winning this years Alpe d'Huez stage). These are quite rare since for a breakaway to survive it cannot have a rider that will threaten the GC and it needs to be large enough for the riders to share the effort and keep the peloton away.

The main thing that effects bike races is drafting where the riders that are sheltered behind the front men can save up to 40% of energy just riding in the slipstream. You will often see a rider at the front flick their elbow out, this is a signal to the rider behind to come through and ride on the front. Whether they do this is another matter, most will because it will keep the pace of they group up ad if they don't, it will be remembered in future races and others may not help a wheel sucker out.

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I don't think it is a nationalist feeling that opposes the Anglophones. The thing that cycling traditionalists can't stand is the way Western technology and science has changed the training, preparation and recovery programmes. Riders no longer are separately purely by ability.

 

It's  comparable to the reason why traditional rugby union fans disparage rugby league, because professionalism has  meant that RU teams have recruited and adopted RL coaching, training and playing practices. Essentially, since then, the opportunities for the flair player in a given RU match have diminished ... just as they have in a given post-Superleague RL match.

 

In cycling and rugby, you can't halt progress. However, it is natural for we fans to revere the old-style characters that graced our sport.

How we long for the days when you could win a Tour on Gauloises, brandy, coke and amphetamines.  ;) 

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