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ckn

Voyager 1 nearly in interstellar space

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Humankind has certainly had its monies worth from the Voyager missions.

We certainly have, it's 10 years beyond the most optimistic projection of the life of 1&2, especially still being able to put out a signal that we can receive clearly.

 

It's a fantastic achievement and is a recognition that sometimes you really do have to over-engineer things.  It's a real shame that many things are built to a budget these days with compromises on specification if the budget is threatened rather than built to a specification and damn the budget as they used to in the 70s and 80s.  The achievements of the 60s and 70s space engineers are right up there with the very best engineering achievements in human history, doing well above and beyond what should be possible with the technology standards of the day and it still working far better than things we can do with modern day commodity electronics expertise.

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We certainly have, it's 10 years beyond the most optimistic projection of the life of 1&2, especially still being able to put out a signal that we can receive clearly.

 

It's a fantastic achievement and is a recognition that sometimes you really do have to over-engineer things.  It's a real shame that many things are built to a budget these days with compromises on specification if the budget is threatened rather than built to a specification and damn the budget as they used to in the 70s and 80s.  The achievements of the 60s and 70s space engineers are right up there with the very best engineering achievements in human history, doing well above and beyond what should be possible with the technology standards of the day and it still working far better than things we can do with modern day commodity electronics expertise.

 

I agree, although the various Mars rovers have also done very well - again exceeding expectations. Of course the Voyagers took advantage of the fact that the main planets were in an alignment that lent itself to a 'tour' like this, but, as mentioned in the article, a modern day probe would probably use solar sails to triple the mission speed.

 

I know the main mission goal was to explore planets such as Jupiter and Saturn - who can forget the images of Saturn from 'the far side', the detail captured of Jupiter, the proof of vulcanism on Io, and the discovery of the 'pre-biotic' chemical composition of Titan's surface and atmosphere - but having an object being on the verge of escaping the solar system has to be one of the greatest achievements of humankind.

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Humankind has certainly had its monies worth from the Voyager missions.

Captain Janeway certainly has done an admirable job in the delta quadrant....  :ph34r:

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Captain Janeway certainly has done an admirable job in the delta quadrant....  :ph34r:

Then there's the first Star Trek movie...

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Then there's the first Star Trek movie...

Is that the first Star Trek movie or the last Star Trek movie which is now actually the first one

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Is that the first Star Trek movie or the last Star Trek movie which is now actually the first one

First. Where the Voyager probe comes back to destroy us all.

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Then there's the first Star Trek movie...

 

There you go, Voyager 1 going where no man(-made object) has gone before. Boldly.

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I was wondering where the new RAF transporter aircraft had disappeared too. Someone in Air Command definitely gave the wrong directions to the pilot.

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I bet it could do with a good clean

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