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Mumby Magic

The Mallard

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Only the British could design and build such a superb loco..

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.and have the coal shovelled in by hand as Mallard races along at over 100 mph when it would have been quite simple to have a mechanical system to do it. If there's a hard way to do something, we'll find it!!

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75 years ago since it did the 126 MPH run.

 

Only the British could design and build such a superb loco..

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.and have the coal shovelled in by hand as Mallard races along at over 100 mph when it would have been quite simple to have a mechanical system to do it. If there's a hard way to do something, we'll find it!!

mallard didn't exactly do a 126 mph run. She only attained that speed momentarily, and it wasn't pulling a revenue earning train rather a small test rig. The loco failed almost immediately afterwards with an over heating big end on the inside cylinder. mechanical stokers were already in US on amwerican railways, and were introduced by Oliver Bulleid, Gresley's understudy at the LNER, when he took over as CME of the Southern Railway. they were impractical for the uk, and weren't proceeded with to any great extent.

 

Mallard and her sisters were almost identucal to their predecessors mechanically-the famous A1/A3 pacifics. The streamlining wasn't designed ro make them go faster there being other factors-the track for instance that influenced that, rather it made them more fuel efficient.

 

Arguably Stanier's Coronation class designed for the West Coast main line atttained similar speeds with heavy revenue earning trains, were moree reliable, fuel efficient and easier to maintain. Gresley's complex, fragile designs were to cause major problems during world war two when demands on them became much heavier and maintenance became poorer.

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whats it scrap value?

considerably more than yours

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What l'ange said .... and the Germans already had diesels that could go faster, while we built steam until 1960, for all of 8 years service.

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mallard didn't exactly do a 126 mph run. She only attained that speed momentarily, and it wasn't pulling a revenue earning train rather a small test rig. The loco failed almost immediately afterwards with an over heating big end on the inside cylinder. mechanical stokers were already in US on amwerican railways, and were introduced by Oliver Bulleid, Gresley's understudy at the LNER, when he took over as CME of the Southern Railway. they were impractical for the uk, and weren't proceeded with to any great extent.

 

Mallard and her sisters were almost identucal to their predecessors mechanically-the famous A1/A3 pacifics. The streamlining wasn't designed ro make them go faster there being other factors-the track for instance that influenced that, rather it made them more fuel efficient.

 

Arguably Stanier's Coronation class designed for the West Coast main line atttained similar speeds with heavy revenue earning trains, were moree reliable, fuel efficient and easier to maintain. Gresley's complex, fragile designs were to cause major problems during world war two when demands on them became much heavier and maintenance became poorer.

That speed was attained on the downhill at Stoke Bank too but despite all that I still think it's a great moment in railway history.

 

When my son was a toddler I remember taking him to see Mallard on the Anlaby Road curve (the footbridge closest to the KC Stadium crosses it). She was a stunningly beautiful machine. The noise frightened him to death when she started moving though.

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That speed was attained on the downhill at Stoke Bank too but despite all that I still think it's a great moment in railway history.

 

When my son was a toddler I remember taking him to see Mallard on the Anlaby Road curve (the footbridge closest to the KC Stadium crosses it). She was a stunningly beautiful machine. The noise frightened him to death when she started moving though.

there's no denying it.

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mallard didn't exactly do a 126 mph run. She only attained that speed momentarily, and it wasn't pulling a revenue earning train rather a small test rig. The loco failed almost immediately afterwards with an over heating big end on the inside cylinder. mechanical stokers were already in US on amwerican railways, and were introduced by Oliver Bulleid, Gresley's understudy at the LNER, when he took over as CME of the Southern Railway. they were impractical for the uk, and weren't proceeded with to any great extent.

 

Mallard and her sisters were almost identucal to their predecessors mechanically-the famous A1/A3 pacifics. The streamlining wasn't designed ro make them go faster there being other factors-the track for instance that influenced that, rather it made them more fuel efficient.

 

Arguably Stanier's Coronation class designed for the West Coast main line atttained similar speeds with heavy revenue earning trains, were moree reliable, fuel efficient and easier to maintain. Gresley's complex, fragile designs were to cause major problems during world war two when demands on them became much heavier and maintenance became poorer.

 

mechanical stokers.... were impractical for the uk, 

 

Any idea why that was?

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mechanical stokers.... were impractical for the uk, 

 

Any idea why that was?

Probably the unions...

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The literature next to the train at the York Railway Museum says that Mallard wasn't specially prepared for thre speed-test run and any of the trains of that style could have achieved it. Brilliant engineering, irresespective of whether its reliabily was exceeded by othertrains.

 

It's horses for courses. Concorde probably wasn't as reliable as a Boeing 707 and you can pay £100,000 for a sports car that is less reliable than a Vauxhall panel  van. 

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Probably the unions...

no they were used by Oliver Bulleid on the Southern Railway, and I think by Riddles experimentally on some 9f standard locos.

 

The demands and needs, as well as the coal on US railways were different to UK railways.

 

massive slowreally  long distance freight trains pulled by hugesimple  locomotives using poor quality powdered coal over largely open country lent themselves to mechanical stokers.

 

uk railways for the most part used high quality coal thermal efficiency was more crucial meaning that firing a steam locomtive required a great deal of technique. It wasn't/isn't merely a case of chucking coal through a hole.

 

When Bulleid used mechanical stokers the locos became less steam efficient, and the locos constantly threw out a thick pall of black smoke, which was unacceptable even before the cdlean air act, especially in enclosed railway stations and depots. The experiment was abandoned by both Belleid and Riddles.

 

on uk railways

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in the print version there is an error.

It says that the design of the streamlining was derived from Bugatti cars. It wasn't.

 

The streamlining was derived from a deisel rail car in Gewrmany that operated a train called the Flying Hamburger, whose streamlining was designed by the bugatti company.

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The literature next to the train at the York Railway Museum says that Mallard wasn't specially prepared for thre speed-test run and any of the trains of that style could have achieved it. Brilliant engineering, irresespective of whether its reliabily was exceeded by othertrains.

 

It's horses for courses. Concorde probably wasn't as reliable as a Boeing 707 and you can pay £100,000 for a sports car that is less reliable than a Vauxhall panel  van. 

mallard isn't a train

 

unlike concorde the A4 class were economical and reliable in  service despite their inderiority over other classes-they paid their way: pulling the same trains as other classes of locomtive: mechanically they were similar, with many interchangeable parts to the flying scotsman class.

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A friend of ours lives in the Yorkshire Dales, and gets the train into Leeds once in a while to do shopping. One day only a few years ago, she turned up at the station and went shopping on the Flying Scotsman, which was being taken out for a bit of exercise and run as a normal service that afternoon. Apparently, it made the return journey (by normal train) seems a little drab by comparison.

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mallard isn't a train

 

unlike concorde the A4 class were economical and reliable in  service despite their inderiority over other classes-they paid their way: pulling the same trains as other classes of locomtive: mechanically they were similar, with many interchangeable parts to the flying scotsman class.

 

Economic is relative ... 35 A4s and 51 A3s were replaced by 22 Deltics. Now, they were economical.

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Royal Scots Grey by any chance?

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Economic is relative ... 35 A4s and 51 A3s were replaced by 22 Deltics. Now, they were economical.

Ah but with your username you are biased ;-)

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Economic is relative ... 35 A4s and 51 A3s were replaced by 22 Deltics. Now, they were economical.

Awesome machines

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Royal Scots Grey by any chance?

 

The very same. I have a picture I took of it flying through Greenfield station at several mph. Happy days.

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Ah but with your username you are biased ;-)

 

Guilty as charged. I used to bunk out of work to ride behind them in their last days. Got sacked in consequence. Totally worth it. (It was a rotten job, anyway).

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