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Saint Billinge

Anyone visited or lived in remote parts of the world?

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I often wonder what it's like to live out in the wilderness (Lancashire apart  :tongue:). Has anyone experienced such places and with tales to tell? Even in the UK there are places out on a limb, where everyday life can be tough and unforgiving.

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Balta sound on unst the most northerly of the shetland isles

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Balta sound on unst the most northerly of the shetland isles

 

A television documentary shown over recent weeks taking a look at the Outer Hebrides has so far been compelling viewing. 

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Been to a couple of places with terrible infrastructure, poverty (Kabul) or war torn (Basra).  A lot of the time people and friendly and just want to get on with life.

 

It is sobering to come home and be in a queue at Sainsbury’s where someone is doing a shop close to 200 quid.  You definitely appreciate how easy we have it in the UK.

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Been to Hungary (late 70s/early 80s) and Albania (about 20 years ago), both under communist rule at the time. Enjoyed effusive hospitality both times, but we could tell our hosts had a hard time making ends meet.

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I was supposed to visit Spurn Point again. That's pretty remote.

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Been to a couple of places with terrible infrastructure, poverty (Kabul) or war torn (Basra).  A lot of the time people and friendly and just want to get on with life.

 

 

 

It is sobering to come home and be in a queue at Sainsbury’s where someone is doing a shop close to 200 quid.  You definitely appreciate how easy we have it in the UK.

I spent a bit of time in a good few countries with the army and have been on holiday in a good few more where you get hints of real poverty that you'd never see here.  It has made me realise how petty many of my first world problems really are compared to the problems a sizeable portion of the world's population have to deal with daily.

 

On the subject at hand though, I spent 6 months in Belize with the army, most of my detachment there was spent away in woody backwaters checking on known drug routes and fields.  Periods of utter peace, miles from the nearest hint of civilisation mixed in with enough hints that we were very, very alone and way beyond easy help.

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Bought,  but never got it up to a liveable standard before selling it on a house in Bobrovec, Slovakia.

 

Met several people in there 70's who'd never ventured beyond there closest town.  One asked a Kiwi guy through a translater where he was from, he told them New Zealand, they asked him if he'd come by bus or bike!

 

Fascinating place though, every house we visited was like something out of the good life, everyone in the country had a veggie patch of some sort and fruit trees to make there own booze with.

 

So whilst not that remote, given its only a two hour flight away and then a three hour drive, but felt like travelling much further, along with going back in time!

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I was supposed to visit Spurn Point again. That's pretty remote.

i can recommend it

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Been to a couple of places with terrible infrastructure, poverty (Kabul) or war torn (Basra).  A lot of the time people and friendly and just want to get on with life.

 

 

 

It is sobering to come home and be in a queue at Sainsbury’s where someone is doing a shop close to 200 quid.  You definitely appreciate how easy we have it in the UK.

 

Stationed in Bahrain in 1967 and really dire for those living in shanty type huts. The stench wafting over from a nearby village was truly awful, as well as out of bounds due to fear of being attacked. If we wanted to go the the main island, then it was by way of a taxi. Yet I suppose it pales when compared to Afghanistan. 

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i can recommend it

I went for the first time a few years ago. Pretty damn good, especially at home time when the tide came in. It's a bit weird being in a 10m slither between the sea and the Humber.

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Stationed in Bahrain in 1967 and really dire for those living in shanty type huts. The stench wafting over from a nearby village was truly awful, as well as out of bounds due to fear of being attacked. If we wanted to go the the main island, then it was by way of a taxi. Yet I suppose it pales when compared to Afghanistan. 

The thing is though that what you're brought up in is "normal" to you and you only think you're different if it's either pointed out to you or if it's rammed in your face by wealthy tourists paying months worth of your wages for a useless tourist trinket.

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I went for the first time a few years ago. Pretty damn good, especially at home time when the tide came in. It's a bit weird being in a 10m slither between the sea and the Humber.

If you really want  to live on the edge, next time you go take a detour off the main road at Ottringham and head to Sunk Island.

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Stationed in Bahrain in 1967 and really dire for those living in shanty type huts. The stench wafting over from a nearby village was truly awful, as well as out of bounds due to fear of being attacked. If we wanted to go the the main island, then it was by way of a taxi. Yet I suppose it pales when compared to Afghanistan. 

Was that at Muharraq?  If so the nicer bits are still over the other side of the harbour!

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The thing is though that what you're brought up in is "normal" to you and you only think you're different if it's either pointed out to you or if it's rammed in your face by wealthy tourists paying months worth of your wages for a useless tourist trinket.

These days even the poor can watch Hollywood films. People in third world countries are quite aware of how poor they are.

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I worked in Romania for a couple of years (98-00) and Thailand for one (97-98). Not as backward as some places but poor enough when you live there.

 

I also went to Burma briefly (98) now that was poor.

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Was that at Muharraq?  If so the nicer bits are still over the other side of the harbour!

 

It was and pestered to death with kids asking for money.  :tongue: I was there when driving on the left side of the road was changed to the right: utter chaos and scary!

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If you really want  to live on the edge, next time you go take a detour off the main road at Ottringham and head to Sunk Island.

 

Just read about it and sounds interesting: a place going nowhere and skies that go on forever and properties dotted about. 

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Stayed in a village in Issan a few times. Not ultra poor, but a real tough existence all the same. Modernisation has only had a minimal effect on rice farming, which remains back breaking work. Flies, mosquitos and stultifying heat add to the fun. It was noticeable how few people aged between about 20 and 50 remained in the village. Mainly they had left for the factories around Bangkok leaving their grandparents to look after the kids.

 

Been twice to Myanmar and only for a few hours each time so can't read much into it, albeit there were clear improvements this year over four years ago.

 

Hoping to visit Cambodia in October, but suspect that will be a shock to the system.

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I live four miles south of Mablethorpe.....remote in time and space.

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i lived in little plum stead in norfolk for a couple of years

 

you would think it boring surrounded by miles and miles of farm land right to the horizon in every direction but it was beautiful

brilliant skyscapes

I would walk miles in all weathers and come upon beautiful little medieval churches

there was one bus a day in and out of norwich and you made the most of it not many people had cars

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Villages/towns in Northern Thailand, very much off the beaten track. Still a very basic existence, where the sight of a white man still caused a considerable stir. That was ten years ago though, it's probably changed a bit now, no electricity or running water, but a very friendly place. Hard going if you don't speak any Thai, which I didn't.

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There are parts of Bangkok where people will literally follow you around because they've (presumably) never seen anyone white before. You don't need to go to Northern Thailand for that.

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There are parts of Bangkok where people will literally follow you around because they've (presumably) never seen anyone white before. You don't need to go to Northern Thailand for that.

Or because they are poor and can spot a soft touch.....

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