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l'angelo mysterioso

The steam locomotive thread

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Pulled by one of their blinkin' diesels on the train to Dungeness!  But, no matter, got chance to see a few in action in and around New Romney.  Here's good old Winston Churchill:

 

9530467483_b46fcd47c1_c.jpg

Winston Churchill by Jon Smalldon, on Flickr

 

TBH I'd rather see, smell and hear than be on a train pulled by one, when you may as well be pulled by diesel or electric. Of course if everyone thought like me there'd be no steam specials and nothing for me to watch! Great picture

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TBH I'd rather see, smell and hear than be on a train pulled by one, when you may as well be pulled by diesel or electric. Of course if everyone thought like me there'd be no steam specials and nothing for me to watch! Great picture

 

Thanks.  My first memories of the RHDR are as you say - being dragged by my dad to watch and take pictures of the trains but never actually travel on one!

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I knew there was a thread somewhere.  Someone remarked the other day that seeing steam locos on preserved lines like the KWVR is ok, (and if it wasn't for the preserved lines there possibly wouldn't be any steam locos left)  but seeing them on the main line at speed is miles better.  They said it's like seeing an animal in a zoo as opposed to seeing it in the wild. Pretty good analogy I thought.

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the tracks that preserved steam locomotives run on were part of the rail system at one time. For instance if you travel on the Keighley Worth valley Railway you are travelling on an actual branch line. If you travel on the Middleton railway you are travelling on an actual industrial railway: the oldest railway in the world. The North York Moors Railway is 18 miles long and takes in some dramatic scenery along a genuine piece of infrastructure, same with the Strathspey Railway. The locomotives are in their natural environment, doing real jobs. And they are railway locomotives-machines, not wild animals taken from their natural environment. Steam locomotives are obsolete pieces of industrial equipment that people have kept in service on preserved lines so that people can appreciate their power and beauty. They run on real railways. Wild animals in zoos are living creatures bred outside their natural environment, living outside their natural environment, purely for people to look at. 

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Pulled by one of their blinkin' diesels on the train to Dungeness!  But, no matter, got chance to see a few in action in and around New Romney.  Here's good old Winston Churchill:

 

9530467483_b46fcd47c1_c.jpg

Winston Churchill by Jon Smalldon, on Flickr

the smoke and steam don't look right.

but this is a cracking photo creating a sense of scale that makes the loco and it's train look 'full size' as it were.

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the tracks that preserved steam locomotives run on were part of the rail system at one time. For instance if you travel on the Keighley Worth valley Railway you are travelling on an actual branch line. If you travel on the Middleton railway you are travelling on an actual industrial railway: the oldest railway in the world. The North York Moors Railway is 18 miles long and takes in some dramatic scenery along a genuine piece of infrastructure, same with the Strathspey Railway. The locomotives are in their natural environment, doing real jobs. And they are railway locomotives-machines, not wild animals taken from their natural environment. Steam locomotives are obsolete pieces of industrial equipment that people have kept in service on preserved lines so that people can appreciate their power and beauty. They run on real railways. Wild animals in zoos are living creatures bred outside their natural environment, living outside their natural environment, purely for people to look at. 

 

To be slightly pedantic; large express locomotives would rarely, if ever, be found working on branch lines. And the severe speed restrictions in place on preserved railway branch lines (25mph max, AFAIR) does these larger machines a great disservice IMO.

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To be slightly pedantic; large express locomotives would rarely, if ever, be found working on branch lines. And the severe speed restrictions in place on preserved railway branch lines (25mph max, AFAIR) does these larger machines a great disservice IMO.

You make a good point

But these locomotives still exist and are cherished. They weren't scrapped .Some have been even improved: for instance the duke of Gloucester's draughting problems that limited its career were solved post preservation. Some main lines lend themselves to use by large passenger locomotives, the classic being the settle or rather leeds to Carlisle. My point is that the zoo analogy is inept. Also preserved lines give an authentic impression, and that not all railway preservation is about express passenger locomotives.

Edited by l'angelo mysterioso

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the tracks that preserved steam locomotives run on were part of the rail system at one time. For instance if you travel on the Keighley Worth valley Railway you are travelling on an actual branch line. If you travel on the Middleton railway you are travelling on an actual industrial railway: the oldest railway in the world. The North York Moors Railway is 18 miles long and takes in some dramatic scenery along a genuine piece of infrastructure, same with the Strathspey Railway. The locomotives are in their natural environment, doing real jobs. And they are railway locomotives-machines, not wild animals taken from their natural environment. Steam locomotives are obsolete pieces of industrial equipment that people have kept in service on preserved lines so that people can appreciate their power and beauty. They run on real railways. Wild animals in zoos are living creatures bred outside their natural environment, living outside their natural environment, purely for people to look at. 

The North York Moors railway now has some services that go as far as Whitby. A nice way to go to the seaside.

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Y

To be slightly pedantic; large express locomotives would rarely, if ever, be found working on branch lines. And the severe speed restrictions in place on preserved railway branch lines (25mph max, AFAIR) does these larger machines a great disservice IMO.

Yes that's exactly the point, Sir Nigel Gresley runs on the NYMR at 25 mph. Here it is at speed in April 2014

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4i-ZmOeU6Y

or here's Princess Coronation class Duchess of Sutherland on the West Coast Main Line

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifYDLi1yqT0

Edited by Trojan

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Yes that's exactly the point, Sir Nigel Gresley runs on the NYMR at 25 mph. Here it is at speed in April 2014

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4i-ZmOeU6Y

or here's Princess Coronation class Duchess of Sutherland on the West Coast Main Line

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifYDLi1yqT0

it makes no difference

the analogy with animals in a zoo is ridiculous.

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A few pics here may suit the steam buffs, a little diesel thrown in. 

 

Dartmouth

 

Bodmin

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A few pics here may suit the steam buffs, a little diesel thrown in. 

 

Dartmouth

 

Bodmin

The Dartmouth one is pretty good Dave.  I went on it last year, boat from Dartmouth up the Dart to Totnes, bus to Paignton, and then train back to Dartmouith, it was a good day out.

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it makes no difference

the analogy with animals in a zoo is ridiculous.

But zoos preserved endangered species, as do preserved railways, you can see these species in zoos, but not in their natural habitats, like preserved railways (NYMR is not the natural habitat of Sir Nigel Gresley)   There was an item on TV at the weekend, two lions were attacking a buffalo, the buffalo herd turned on the lion and saved their fellow animal, you could never see that in a zoo.  It may be an inexact analogy, but it'll do for me,

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