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ckn

Career change

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Has anyone successfully changed their career?

 

I posted this post last month about me looking to move back into permanent work but a number of recent things have made me realise that it may be the overall career I can no longer stand rather than just bits of it.  I went for a 2nd interview yesterday, it went very well and there's an excellent chance I'll get an offer early next week but the job itself doesn't give me that feeling of excitement at getting it despite it being one of the top jobs available in my industry and profession.  The thought of working in my day job for another 5-6 years just makes me cold.

 

So... I'm very tempted to just sack it all for a month or two and put a lot of effort into investigating a career change into doing something I actually enjoy.

 

I fell into my current career by accident in 2000, right place at the right time and given a chance that I really shouldn't have been given to run a major international technology project despite having never run a project more complex than my weekly Tesco shopping trip.  Looking back on it with 13 years of experience behind me, it's a project that should only really have been given to someone at the top of their trade due to its complicating factors of difficult end client, 8 figure budget, 50+ full-time staff, an unproven experimental technology and a set of requirements that struggled to fill one page.  I did fairly well, mainly through luck and being dragged along by a very experienced technical lead.  Since then, that's been my career, doing higher end technology and business projects with complex outcomes.  For the first 10 years it was good fun and very enjoyable but it has  become a bit of a chore over the last 3.

 

I know I have a lot of transferable skills and wide-ranging professional qualifications but I've never really put the effort into thinking about what other jobs I'd like to do with my skills.  I may even put the effort into the career change and discover that all I really needed was a sabbatical from my career to refresh my enthusiasm, I doubt it but I'm not closing off the door to my past career without doing the proper due diligence.

 

At the age of 42, I'm getting to the point where I want to be doing a career that interests me, even if it's lower paid, than one that I grudge.  I also would prefer one where my daily commute is far shorter than my typical trip into London where all of my likely top-end employers are based.  My wife's serious illness over the last few years has also made me look at quality of life issues and realise that I really want to be spending less of my time thinking about work and get to the point that my private life takes more time than my working life.  Quite often on some of my projects I never do things outside of work from Monday to Friday due to the pressures of the job and long commutes, I'm out doing sport on Saturday and that leaves the solitary Sunday that we have to pack things into to get quality time together.  I now realise that that's not acceptable.

 

I'd be very interested to hear any examples of others who have changed careers and lessons learned from that change.

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Look, buy a bright red sports car, have an affair with a blonde with FLBP and forget about it ...

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Learn how to plaster a wall and you'll be made for life

 

OR....

 

 

Do something, anything, but whatever it is call it "Wedding ...." - allows you to charge 5 times the standard rate

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I switched from a good job at Rolls Royce (32 years service) to become a Chiropodist.

I was getting on a bit, but becoming self employed was definitely a good move.

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Take the job if it's offered; you have no concrete alternative lined up.

 

Do it for a minimum of a year to do justice to your employer for taking you on.

 

In that period, you can decide if you like the work and make plans if you don't.

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Take the job if it's offered; you have no concrete alternative lined up.

 

Do it for a minimum of a year to do justice to your employer for taking you on.

 

In that period, you can decide if you like the work and make plans if you don't.

Thanks for that, I do have an alternative though as I have quite a bit of work I can take as self-employed.  It's almost a win-win situation for job hunting as I know I'm fairly secure.

 

Your second paragraph is my problem, if I start a job, I intend to stick it out for far longer before jumping ship unless it's an intolerable workplace.  I really don't want to let the company down as it's a severe pain doing recruitment for the position, typically taking 3-6 months with notice periods and the recruitment process, never mind the recruitment agency's fee.  I'd hate to go into a job without my full heart into it.  The job is a good one but is a long commute away (just off Fleet Street) plus quite regular international hours working patterns plus having far too much responsibility to do anything other than be fully committed to it.

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Look, buy a bright red sports car, have an affair with a blonde with FLBP and forget about it ...

My wife already thinks I look like my dad from 20 years ago without having the same mid-life crisis as he did...

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I switched from a good job at Rolls Royce (32 years service) to become a Chiropodist.

I was getting on a bit, but becoming self employed was definitely a good move.

Thanks.  One thing that has suggested itself to me a lot over the last few years is becoming a therapist, that's certainly on my list of things to investigate.

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Learn how to plaster a wall and you'll be made for life

 

OR....

 

 

Do something, anything, but whatever it is call it "Wedding ...." - allows you to charge 5 times the standard rate

I'm fairly sure that'd not be something want to do!  Too physically lazy these days!

 

On the "wedding" whatever, I'd rather repeatedly punch myself in the nuts than work in that industry, too many bridezillas and miserable sods with unrealistic expectations.  I attended one wedding last year where the bride was in tears because her cake was on a normal table instead of a special cake table, apparently that "ruined her entire wedding day" ... no thanks.

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I enjoy job interviews and have changed jobs a few times over the 13 years since graduating. I always look for something new that offers me something different and most of the time I have been happy with the move I made. On a bad a day I look back and think the grass was greener before, but every job has new challenges and it's a matter of assuming the right mindset and finding ways to deal with it.

 

I started off working in my chosen industry and spent almost 11 years there in various roles. I saw that a lot of the companies in this line of work were outsourcing to contract research organisations for their project management so I jumped ship and moved to a CRO. It was a bit of a culture shock at first, some new challenges but a lot of it not that different to before (apart from a pay rise and I can now work from home 100%).

 

I always keep half an eye on the job market for my next move, I am happy enough at the moment but if things change or I get bored then I may start looking again. Not sure there are many jobs for life these days and employees are seen as being fairly disposable so I try to be pragmatic about the whole working situation.

 

Good luck for your move should you make one Craig.

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I switched from a good job at Rolls Royce (32 years service) to become a Chiropodist.

I was getting on a bit, but becoming self employed was definitely a good move.

Pervert.

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I enjoy job interviews and have changed jobs a few times over the 13 years since graduating. I always look for something new that offers me something different and most of the time I have been happy with the move I made. On a bad a day I look back and think the grass was greener before, but every job has new challenges and it's a matter of assuming the right mindset and finding ways to deal with it.

I have read this thread with interest, but putting a downer on it, I'm sure it's much easier switching job sectors when you are younger (I'm not sure how old CKN is), but as you get older it's much harder to find employers who will retrain you. I am 51, and I have been unemployed for 15 days, & I'm already beginning to realise that unless you find an employer who is wangling for a equal age opportunities badge, they don't want to know somone who will retrain & then retire just as they are becomming useful.

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One things for sure if you get this job you won't be able to laud it over these boards as much as you do now.

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I have read this thread with interest, but putting a downer on it, I'm sure it's much easier switching job sectors when you are younger (I'm not sure how old CKN is), but as you get older it's much harder to find employers who will retrain you. I am 51, and I have been unemployed for 15 days, & I'm already beginning to realise that unless you find an employer who is wangling for a equal age opportunities badge, they don't want to know somone who will retrain & then retire just as they are becomming useful.

 

Packed my business in aged 56 in 2005 and found a job within one week. Following redundancy two years ago, I went self-employed as a landscape gardener. One door closes and another one opens. 

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I switched from a good job at Rolls Royce (32 years service) to become a Chiropodist.

I was getting on a bit, but becoming self employed was definitely a good move.

I suppose it helps in that job if you can laugh at defeat.

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Ah. I see

Buy do you see? Do you?

Ps Said boy is well, and has had a career change. I won't post details but he's a happier pirate.

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I suppose it helps in that job if you can laugh at defeat.

I nominate this as 'post of the year'

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adc-79jhotd117_8.jpg

 

42? Isn't that the answer to life...the universe...everything?

 

only go self employed if you really can't get a job. Make sure you have cash in the bank to pay direct debits for many many months, get your invoices out asap and don't be afraid to chase payment.  

 

 

Having said that, I used to work closely with this guy for many year when he was an engineer/sales until this major change of direction  probably ten years ago. so it IS possible.

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