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YCKonstantine

Goal line drop outs

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I was under the impression that in RL on the line = over the line. But recently I've been seeing gldo's given for the ball being ON the try line. So surely by the earlier logic if it was on the try line that would mean it would be in the field of play? Why the exception?

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On the line is in the goal area. So if attacking team outs it on line try, defending team means gldo

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I was under the impression that in RL on the line = over the line. But recently I've been seeing gldo's given for the ball being ON the try line. So surely by the earlier logic if it was on the try line that would mean it would be in the field of play? Why the exception?

You contradict yourself.

The line is in goal.

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I was under the impression that in RL on the line = over the line. But recently I've been seeing gldo's given for the ball being ON the try line. So surely by the earlier logic if it was on the try line that would mean it would be in the field of play? Why the exception?

 

 

Eh, just read that back to yourself, it makes no sense

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Don't see how I contradict myself, if the attacking team grounds the ball on the try line, it is over the line and therefore is a try. So why if the defending team grounds the ball on the try line is it not 'over the line' and play on?

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Don't see how I contradict myself, if the attacking team grounds the ball on the try line, it is over the line and therefore is a try. So why if the defending team grounds the ball on the try line is it not 'over the line' and play on?

Because on the line is in goal, not 'over the line'

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Don't see how I contradict myself, if the attacking team grounds the ball on the try line, it is over the line and therefore is a try. So why if the defending team grounds the ball on the try line is it not 'over the line' and play on?

The try line is in goal, which you acknowledge.

Hence, if the defending side have the ball on the line, they are tackled in goal I.e a drop out.

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I can see where the OP is coming from, but all the "if it's on the line it's over the line" rules are regarding the ball going out of the field of play.

 

So it's either in touch, over the try line or over the dead ball line.

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I can see where the OP is coming from, but all the "if it's on the line it's over the line" rules are regarding the ball going out of the field of play.

 

So it's either in touch, over the try line or over the dead ball line.

Eh?

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I can see where the OP is coming from, but all the "if it's on the line it's over the line" rules are regarding the ball going out of the field of play.

.....And in goal

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You contradict yourself.

The line is in goal.

 

No he doesn't really.  I see his point.  The line is defined in the laws as in-goal.  It could just as easily be defined as being in the field of play. When you're making the rules up  you have to choose one or the other but the choice itself is 50/50.

 

The effect of these line rules is that one edge of the line is the marker.  In rugby, the inside edge of the line is the touch line, whereas in soccer it's the outside edge.

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No he doesn't really. I see his point. The line is defined in the laws as in-goal. It could just as easily be defined as being in the field of play. When you're making the rules up you have to choose one or the other but the choice itself is 50/50.

The effect of these line rules is that one edge of the line is the marker. In rugby, the inside edge of the line is the touch line, whereas in soccer it's the outside edge.

He doesn't contradict himself he's just wrong. As far as I can tell he's under the impression that the in goal line means 'over the line' if touched, it doesn't.

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Of course it's a contradiction.

He wants the try line to be in goal for the attackers and in the field of play for defenders.

The line is in goal for both teams. No grey area. No confusion.

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If you applied the OP's logic to touchlines then, if a ball was kicked over the touchline but before it lands a player jumps from the field of and thumps it back towards in field and it lands on the line it wouldn't be in touch.

 

Lines are not no-mans land.

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Of course it's a contradiction.

He wants the try line to be in goal for the attackers and in the field of play for defenders.

The line is in goal for both teams. No grey area. No confusion.

 

He didn't say he wanted the try line to be in goal for the attackers.

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(It is tempting to write a lengthy post but...)

As others have highlighted, the goal-line/try-line forms part of the in-goal area. This does not change simply because a team is defending.

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Some of you seem to have lost your heads at a simple post.

I wasn't disputing the fact that that is clearly the rule, I was asking why it is different, but as some calm people have cleared the matter up, lock this before someone has a heart attack, jeez!

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It's not different!!!

Regardless of possession, the line is in goal.

The rule does not change...it stays the same...the line is in goal!

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On the line is in the goal area. So if attacking team outs it on line try, defending team means gldo

In fairness, this first sentence provided a complete answer to the OP.

For anybody who is still confused, deprogramme the thought that says "on the line = over the line".

Instead, think, "the goal-line/try-line is (a small) part of the in-goal area".

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It's not different!!!

Regardless of possession, the line is in goal.

The rule does not change...it stays the same...the line is in goal!

Okay!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!;#!££!;£111one

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Some of you seem to have lost your heads at a simple post.

I wasn't disputing the fact that that is clearly the rule, I was asking why it is different, but as some calm people have cleared the matter up, lock this before someone has a heart attack, jeez!

 

I suggest you read your own post you clearly state "I was under the impression that in RL on the line = over the line. "  You were clearly stating you thought the rule was different depending on which way the ball was being carried.

 

You also clearly didn't understand what the rule was despite your now "apparent" understanding.

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I suggest you read your own post you clearly state "I was under the impression that in RL on the line = over the line. " You were clearly stating you thought the rule was different depending on which way the ball was being carried.

You also clearly didn't understand what the rule was despite your now "apparent" understanding.

Yes, I 'thought' it was different, I was wrong as has been pointed out to me by some of the calmer people on here. But hey, I'm not the only one who doesn't know every single rule. Just ask the thousands that boo when they can't have a quick 20m restart because they've passed it for the tap.

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