Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Futtocks

One for the Northern Soul fans

31 posts in this topic

Yeah looking forward to this :dancer:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given that there a limit to what you can do on 30 minutes, it was a rather good documentary. Great to see the young kids eschewing manufactured pop in favour of something more real too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dad used to go to the Casino and I can see now where the "rave" has originated from. The way the participants described the whole thing reminds me of my own experiences in underground house and techno nights.....the beat, the drugs, the pseudo-religious experience, that underground buzz, sense of "us" and it being "ours".......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unsurprising I do like Soul music though the whole Wigan scene was long before my time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey kids! Work on your dancing and you too can become an economics correspondent. :P 

 

Seriously, that was a very enjoyable programme, and it was especially heartening to see a new generation still keeping the faith.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dad used to go to the Casino and I can see now where the "rave" has originated from. The way the participants described the whole thing reminds me of my own experiences in underground house and techno nights.....the beat, the drugs, the pseudo-religious experience, that underground buzz, sense of "us" and it being "ours".......

You can very easily draw parallels with the "rave" explosion of the late 80s/early 90s - both initially were working class youth culture movements, with dancing (and taking drugs) being a release from the 9-5 drudgery of day-to-day working life. Living for the weekend is something that us Brits do quite well - hence why our underground club/party scene for years was the envy of the world. It's interesting comparing it to America, where the underground dance/music scene was traditionally either very black, or very gay (or a combination of the two - see the early disco movement).

There's a lot about this in Bill Brewster and Frank Broughton's excellent history of the DJ, "Last Night a DJ Saved My Life".

Interesting, too, that one of the most famous Northern Soul DJs from the early years of the Wigan Casino, Ian Levine, went on to pioneer high energy music (which, admittedly, was largely terrible) - musically different, but still based around driving rhythms, a stomping beat, and a hedonistic outlook on life. Less obsessive crate-digging for records found in somebody's attic in Detroit, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mate of mine used to go with his Adidas bag and talc to help him slide on the floor. There was a big night in Cleethorpes aswell. I like soul music but could never get into Northern Soul I was more of a Stax and Atlantic fan myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there anyway i can watch this again?

I have a digital copy of it. If you send me your e-mail address via PM, we can work out a way to get it to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mate of mine used to go with his Adidas bag and talc to help him slide on the floor. There was a big night in Cleethorpes aswell. I like soul music but could never get into Northern Soul I was more of a Stax and Atlantic fan myself.

me too although NS was more of a dance movement rather than a musical one IMHO

and I hated the clothes as well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dad used to go to the Casino and I can see now where the "rave" has originated from. The way the participants described the whole thing reminds me of my own experiences in underground house and techno nights.....the beat, the drugs, the pseudo-religious experience, that underground buzz, sense of "us" and it being "ours".......

 

I seem to recall being able to enter another night club that backed on to the Wigan Casino. Padge might know more. I did enjoy some great times there when being able to get in due to the long queues stretching down the street. Many clubs and pubs in the Sixties wouldn't let you in unless wearing a tie. I once swapped my cravat for a tie after being refused entry to a nightclub. The burly doorman was quite amused when looking at my tie that didn't match my suit.  :tongue:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love Northern Soul, Tamla, Stax, Philadelphia and all that stuff. It's never lost its attraction and has many younger adherents who weren't born when it had its heyday.

 

My trouble is that I have no talent whatsoever; I am tone deaf, can't sing and can't play an instrument.  

 

I definitely can't dance, so I'm pretty sure that I would only have gone the once to Wigan Casino. Embarrassment would have put paid to more visits,  much as I would have liked to go more often.

:(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I seem to recall being able to enter another night club that backed on to the Wigan Casino. Padge might know more. I did enjoy some great times there when being able to get in due to the long queues stretching down the street. Many clubs and pubs in the Sixties wouldn't let you in unless wearing a tie. I once swapped my cravat for a tie after being refused entry to a nightclub. The burly doorman was quite amused when looking at my tie that didn't match my suit.  :tongue:

Mr M's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr M's.

 

Was it once called king of clubs? Having been to a club in St Helens with some mates one Saturday early evening, we then caught a taxi to Wigan Casino. Come midnight, the same band that had performed in St Helens came on stage. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm off to a Northern soul night in Illingworth this very evening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can very easily draw parallels with the "rave" explosion of the late 80s/early 90s - both initially were working class youth culture movements, with dancing (and taking drugs) being a release from the 9-5 drudgery of day-to-day working life. Living for the weekend is something that us Brits do quite well - hence why our underground club/party scene for years was the envy of the world. It's interesting comparing it to America, where the underground dance/music scene was traditionally either very black, or very gay (or a combination of the two - see the early disco movement).

There's a lot about this in Bill Brewster and Frank Broughton's excellent history of the DJ, "Last Night a DJ Saved My Life".

Interesting, too, that one of the most famous Northern Soul DJs from the early years of the Wigan Casino, Ian Levine, went on to pioneer high energy music (which, admittedly, was largely terrible) - musically different, but still based around driving rhythms, a stomping beat, and a hedonistic outlook on life. Less obsessive crate-digging for records found in somebody's attic in Detroit, though.

What differ from Northern Soul and Rave was that the students and middle classes took over part of the Rave scene alongside Rave music splitting off with loads of genres i.e. Happy Hardcore, Jungle, Techno etc while Northern Soul in the early 1980's continued on the Scooter Scene.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What differ from Northern Soul and Rave was that the students and middle classes took over part of the Rave scene alongside Rave music splitting off with loads of genres i.e. Happy Hardcore, Jungle, Techno etc while Northern Soul in the early 1980's continued on the Scooter Scene.

What on earth is Happy Hardcore? There is only one hardcore, and that is hardcore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can always remember people getting late buses from Rochdale out to Wigan as the northern scene didn't seem to get going until midnight.

 

A workmate of mine has a neighbour who's kitchen floor is made of boards from out of the Casino.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



League Express - Mon 24th July 2017

Rugby League World - August 2017