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Saint Billinge

Kindle or parperbacks/hardbacks

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Probably depends on your age and what you've grown up with. I prefer electronic formats myself.

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Probably depends on your age and what you've grown up with. I prefer electronic formats myself.

 

True.  I love books.  I tend not to read fiction or 'the popular books' but read about things that interest me or pique my interest, mainly history.    Just done a check on Amazon and the last four books I bought do not come in electronic format, so until they start printing and 'Kindlising' all books printed, I'll stick with the printed word.

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One huge disadvantage for some authors on an ebook only is in sales. I have sold as many as 100 books in a day in such as WH Smiths. You have the physical means to flick through the pages in order to woo potential customers. Not so on an ebook only. Price has to be carefully considered as well. I thought Rugby League In Its own Words was too expensive at £17.95. As it turned out, the print-run of 3,000 copies sold out within eleven weeks. Demand was huge running up to the busy Christmas period only for the publisher not wanting to print any more. Obviously any book has to have an appeal factor. 

 

Incidentally, full-time authors are considered a health risk by many insurance companies!

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For me nothing beats rummaging through piles of old musty paperbacks at the local second hand book shop, only the other day I got myself half a dozen Michael Moorcock novels for a quid! I should probably give the kindle a try though.

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For me nothing beats rummaging through piles of old musty paperbacks at the local second hand book shop, only the other day I got myself half a dozen Michael Moorcock novels for a quid! I should probably give the kindle a try though.

 

Indeed, there is no shortage of cheap paperbacks and you can give them to someone else. 

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A good advantage to Kindle is that thousands of out-of-copyright classics are available 100% free and instantly available. All those books you weren't sure you'd like? Now you can find out with zero risk or expense.

 

I am currently enjoying 'The Great Gatsby', which I've been meaning to read for years, but never got round to.

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Just seen a Kindle-esque thingey in W H Smith, had a bit of a try and have to say looks good, I might indulge come pay day.

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A good advantage to Kindle is that thousands of out-of-copyright classics are available 100% free and instantly available. All those books you weren't sure you'd like? Now you can find out with zero risk or expense.

 

I am currently enjoying 'The Great Gatsby', which I've been meaning to read for years, but never got round to.

 

I suppose there are advantages and disadvantage, depending on which way you look at Kindle versus paperbacks. 

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I read books in bed but use my kindle daily for my commute and holidays.

 

I've read books I wouldn't have picked up in a book shop but really enjoyed such as rock & roll and bowls, really funny book about living in Norfolk

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I have a Kindle Fire, which is a tablet computer that happens to have an e-book reader on it.

 

If you just want an e-book reader and nothing else, you would probably be better off with the (cheaper) Paperwhite Kindle, which is a dedicated machine and can be more easily read in bright sunlight, thanks to the screen design.

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I do think the Kindle brand isn’t particularly helpful when it comes to that tablet for the consumer. For the tech savvy it’s easy to see that it’s aimed more at the tablet computer market rather than the e-reader market – those who aren’t as aware of such matters though often don’t realise you can get the Kindle reading app on pretty much every tablet/smartphone going. I’ve lost count of the amount of times I’ve pointed out the Kindle Fire isn’t specifically a full colour e-reader (the likes of which in terms of the paper/ink effect like a regular Kindle may be some years away). I can see why Amazon do it, but it does cause some confusion.

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I do like me Kindle Fire though.  At the time I did think about getting a Nexus but the Kindle works well for me.

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I agree on that Kindle Fire.  I have the older generation Kindle, the one with the keyboard, and it's fantastic for very sunny beaches or parks, no glare or unworkable contrast issues, but if I try to use the wife's iPad or my laptop then I give it up very quickly as a bad joke.  The annoyance is that the local library's software is compatible with the Fire as it's a proper tablet but not with any of the more technologically basic Paperwhite ones.

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I wonder where this will end up, because I doubt paperbacks/hardbacks will disappear as a thing of the past. I did read that e-Book sales have overtaken printed books. My good wife bought four books from Waterstones, Chester, today, and plenty more customers in the shop.

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Using my kindle on holiday right now

Belting piece of kit apart from the keyboard becoming french at the moment

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Amazon's 'Matchbook' scheme - a bit like their 'Autorip' service, but for books.

You tease you... not out in the UK yet.

 

I've hundreds of books bought from Amazon over the years that I'd love to be able to move to ebook version but I'm too tight to pay the idiot prices for the ebooks.  There are many paperbacks that you can buy for trivial prices in shops or even in omnibus editions yet the ebook prices are ridiculous considering there's no physical element to the long remaindered book.

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You tease you... not out in the UK yet.

 

I've hundreds of books bought from Amazon over the years that I'd love to be able to move to ebook version but I'm too tight to pay the idiot prices for the ebooks.  There are many paperbacks that you can buy for trivial prices in shops or even in omnibus editions yet the ebook prices are ridiculous considering there's no physical element to the long remaindered book.

It took about 5-6 months for Autorip to make its way across the Atlantic. There are a few books I've lost/given away that I wouldn't mind having again if the price was right (or zero). 

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You tease you... not out in the UK yet.

 

I've hundreds of books bought from Amazon over the years that I'd love to be able to move to ebook version but I'm too tight to pay the idiot prices for the ebooks.  There are many paperbacks that you can buy for trivial prices in shops or even in omnibus editions yet the ebook prices are ridiculous considering there's no physical element to the long remaindered book.

 

Out of interest Craig, what prices would you say are OK, if any. Taking account of the loads of money spent on mine and Amazon's 30% take, as well as VAT, it is difficult working out a reasonable price? With SSAFA not getting back in touch, I have reduced mine to £4.94, with hopefully some money going to a junior football club I watch on Saturdays. 

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Out of interest Craig, what prices would you say are OK, if any. Taking account of the loads of money spent on mine and Amazon's 30% take, as well as VAT, it is difficult working out a reasonable price? With SSAFA not getting back in touch, I have reduced mine to £4.94, with hopefully some money going to a junior football club I watch on Saturdays. 

A friend who works for a publishing house took me through the fiction book process, I've no idea about the non-fiction market so can't comment!

 

For fiction books that are still on hardback or first release sale then I see nothing wrong with a hardback book being in the £10-£20 range with an ebook rate of similar to account for the VAT addition.  Most authors still get paid per copy at that stage.

 

For books that the author has sold as a paperback job-lot then the £5-£10 mark is fine for the first year or so, again ebook price would be about the same.  Authors usually don't get a bean once they sign over paperback rights but the publishers want their money back at least.

 

Once books get into the year plus category then they're remainder bin material and will only get republished if they're a big seller.  This is the point that ebooks should be discounted down to a few £ as there's absolutely no physical cost to the publisher and every ebook is money in the bank.  At that time, it'd have to be still in the bestseller top 10 for me to think that it's worth more than £5.

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A friend who works for a publishing house took me through the fiction book process, I've no idea about the non-fiction market so can't comment!

 

For fiction books that are still on hardback or first release sale then I see nothing wrong with a hardback book being in the £10-£20 range with an ebook rate of similar to account for the VAT addition.  Most authors still get paid per copy at that stage.

 

For books that the author has sold as a paperback job-lot then the £5-£10 mark is fine for the first year or so, again ebook price would be about the same.  Authors usually don't get a bean once they sign over paperback rights but the publishers want their money back at least.

 

Once books get into the year plus category then they're remainder bin material and will only get republished if they're a big seller.  This is the point that ebooks should be discounted down to a few £ as there's absolutely no physical cost to the publisher and every ebook is money in the bank.  At that time, it'd have to be still in the bestseller top 10 for me to think that it's worth more than £5.

 

Thanks for the reply. The way I look at it is that there has been a huge outlay putting the book together, so I'll stick at the price for now and see how it goes. One thing for sure, I won't end up flushed with money.  ;)

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