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iangidds

Koukash tweet

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At the moment any spare cash we generate needs to be pumped into increasing junior participation and the Scolarship/Academy system.  If this isn't addressed, will we have many elite players to pay top dollar to in the future?

 

As always with Rugby League, we need to think long term, rather than tomorrow's glory.

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Marwan Koukash is absolutely right.

 

Ok, so it could be argued that the salary cap was a necessary evil for a short period of time. However, long term implementation at the behest of a governing body is akin to sporting communism. It should be solely down to clubs to decide how much they spend and on what.

 

Remember the Wigan team of yore, with the likes of Hanley, Offiah, Quinnell, Robinson and Tuigamala? Most people in the UK knew who they were. Now most people in the UK wouldn't be able to name one member of the Wigan team (possibly with the curious exception of Andy Powell).

 

And that is largely the result of the salary cap.

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Marwan Koukash is absolutely right.

 

Ok, so it could be argued that the salary cap was a necessary evil for a short period of time. However, long term implementation at the behest of a governing body is akin to sporting communism. It should be solely down to clubs to decide how much they spend and on what.

 

Remember the Wigan team of yore, with the likes of Hanley, Offiah, Quinnell, Robinson and Tuigamala? Most people in the UK knew who they were. Now most people in the UK wouldn't be able to name one member of the Wigan team (possibly with the curious exception of Andy Powell).

 

And that is largely the result of the salary cap.

And the state of the game overall back then? Didn't most of the Sky millions from the birth of Super League get used to prevent most of the clubs going to the wall? Now we have perhaps half a dozen, proper, sustainable clubs, and now have a big 4, rather than just Wigan.

DR K's priority should be to turn Salford's off-field operation into something like Wigan's. Noble should have a team of full-time coaching assistants to help him, like Wigan and Leeds have.

Once all that is in place, we'll have another good club, then we can think about raising the salary cap, but whilst our top tier has clubs with the financial clout of clubs like Wakey, Cas and London, then we're going to have an unbalanced comp if the top clubs can spend what they like on players and that won't be in the long-term interest of the game, or ultimately those clubs themselves.

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Marwan Koukash is absolutely right.

 

Ok, so it could be argued that the salary cap was a necessary evil for a short period of time. However, long term implementation at the behest of a governing body is akin to sporting communism. It should be solely down to clubs to decide how much they spend and on what.

 

Remember the Wigan team of yore, with the likes of Hanley, Offiah, Quinnell, Robinson and Tuigamala? Most people in the UK knew who they were. Now most people in the UK wouldn't be able to name one member of the Wigan team (possibly with the curious exception of Andy Powell).

 

And that is largely the result of the salary cap.

 

And what happened to that same Wigan Club or yore?

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Most of teams cant afford to pay the full salary cap so all that will happen is the rich teams will get all the best players n the league will be an obvious top 6 every year

Yes.

Added to which the weaker clubs will get further and further behind and even the top clubs will start to see falling attendances.

When will the fans wake up and realise that you can only increase player salaries by increasing revenue?

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Marwan Koukash is absolutely right.

 

Ok, so it could be argued that the salary cap was a necessary evil for a short period of time. However, long term implementation at the behest of a governing body is akin to sporting communism. It should be solely down to clubs to decide how much they spend and on what.

 

Remember the Wigan team of yore, with the likes of Hanley, Offiah, Quinnell, Robinson and Tuigamala? Most people in the UK knew who they were. Now most people in the UK wouldn't be able to name one member of the Wigan team (possibly with the curious exception of Andy Powell).

 

And that is largely the result of the salary cap.

Maybe they knew who they were because rugby union was much smaller back then and the international rugby league scene was considerably bigger than it is now.

Certainly you wouldn't have got very far if you asked someone to name a RL player that didn't play for Wigan.

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But aren't attendances dropping now because players are leaving and standards are dropping?

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When will the fans wake up and realise that you can only increase player salaries by increasing revenue?

 

And therein lies the apocryphal "chicken and egg" scenario.

 

Don't get me wrong, my last post was perhaps a bit too simplistic and didn't take other factors into account such as pitiful media coverage. But, top class sport is a business. Your job is to put bums on seats, and if that means raiding the other code with its inflated salaries for household names, so be it.

 

Another little example of a lost opportunity was the case of Kirill Koulemine. He was a giant Russian league player who was receiving plaudits from many who saw him take to the field (famously described by one as "making Gorden Tallis look like an angry midget"). Any club could have bought him for relative peanuts and secured a crowd puller.

 

He now plays for Sale RU.

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Raiding the other code was okay when they were just paying boot money but the sad fact is that they have far more money than we do. If you want to start a bidding war then it is best to do it when you have a chance of winning.

Attendances in the other code are about the same as in our game but ticket prices are higher and there is a bigger corporate scene. That would have us at a significant disadvantage but they have the Heineken Cup and money from the International game that just puts it beyond anything that we could match.

Re: the Russian player. He could have been bought up cheaply at one time but that was before RU was involved so it's nothing to do with them really. As soon as he had an offer on the table from Agen then it was game over. Not seen him play but Sale is his fourth RU club that to me suggests that there may have been a bit more to this. Especially since he was playing for London Welsh at one point.

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Koukash is investing his money in the off field aspects of the club. This week a gym was opened at the stadium, something Salford haven't had for years. They will train at the ground as well.

 

He is actually trying to improve all aspects of the club and the experience for fans.

 

He really can bring new people to the games.

 

The sport needs to see more sponsorship like wire's emirates, the actual amount is secondary to the household name . The perception of a sport worth investing in is the way forward.

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So much of what you say is right, Northern Sol. But Marwan Koukash is a businessman (as well as being a genuine enthusiast of the game). He'll be looking at the figures and planning a return, which is precisely how clubs need to be run.

 

The sport needs more Koukashes, but potential investors like him won't want to chance their arm if a club's finances are straightjacketed by a governing body. I know I wouldn't.

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Koukash is investing his money in the off field aspects of the club. This week a gym was opened at the stadium, something Salford haven't had for years. They will train at the ground as well.

 

He is actually trying to improve all aspects of the club and the experience for fans.

 

He really can bring new people to the games.

 

The sport needs to see more sponsorship like wire's emirates, the actual amount is secondary to the household name . The perception of a sport worth investing in is the way forward.

Does Dr Koukash stil intend to purchase the stadium?  If he could do this for the club it would be a lasting legacy.

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So much of what you say is right, Northern Sol. But Marwan Koukash is a businessman (as well as being a genuine enthusiast of the game). He'll be looking at the figures and planning a return, which is precisely how clubs need to be run.

 

The sport needs more Koukashes, but potential investors like him won't want to chance their arm if a club's finances are straightjacketed by a governing body. I know I wouldn't.

He might not like the salary cap but it didn't effect his decision to invest. It probably would have put off some of the less cashed-up investors.

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With a rose bush if you keep cutting of the buds before they flower the roots and stem grow stronger, because energy is not "wasted" in the flowers, however the reason we plant and nurture the rose bush is to enjoy the flowers.

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With a rose bush if you keep cutting of the buds before they flower the roots and stem grow stronger, because energy is not "wasted" in the flowers, however the reason we plant and nurture the rose bush is to enjoy the flowers.

Phil Clarke?

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With a rose bush if you keep cutting of the buds before they flower the roots and stem grow stronger, because energy is not "wasted" in the flowers, however the reason we plant and nurture the rose bush is to enjoy the flowers.

Personally I enjoy a balanced competition where the underdog has at least a small chance of winning rather than one where the big teams always win by large margins when playing the minnows.

I don't think I'm alone as Wigan have higher attendances today than when they were a trophy winning machine. Higher attendances mean more £££s that could go on buying and retaining talent.

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Personally I enjoy a balanced competition where the underdog has at least a small chance of winning rather than one where the big teams always win by large margins when playing the minnows.I don't think I'm alone as Wigan have higher attendances today than when they were a trophy winning machine. Higher attendances mean more £££s that could go on buying and retaining talent.

What he said.......spot on Sol

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But aren't attendances dropping now because players are leaving and standards are dropping?

Attendances are dropping in every sport.

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Attendances are dropping in every sport.

In Super League it has just been the last couple of years before that we were toasting record crowd figures.

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Re: krill koulimne I'm sure I remember seeing him play for a Russian side in the challenge cup years ago against siddal, monster of a man, always hoped he'd be picked up by a championship or sl side. Pity he's wandering through ru now.

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I don't understand why anyone wouldn't want them to have a pay rise.

 

£1.65m salary cap equalling an average of £66,000 per year.  That really isn't a lot when you consider that professional players have a typical career of 10 years and many will be on way less than that £66,000 a year average to cope with the top-end players getting near or above the six figure salary point.  A massively physical sport where your career can be ended in a second through a genuinely accidental collision or leave you a physical wreck after your career ends.  There are only so many coaching or commentating jobs around for ex-players and clubs aren't as tolerant as they'd like people to believe on allowing players to do non-rugby stuff to help them move into other careers after their rugby one finishes.

 

My view is that you'd have to almost double the salary cap to adequately reward players for the level of commitment, both physical and mental, that they have to put into going out on the professional playing field every week in a career that's noticeably shorter and more physically punishing than other team sports.

 

I know we don't have the money to do that and are unlikely to do that as a sport anytime soon.

 

As an aside, this is one of the points that just baffles me about why a player would go out to deliberately injure another player.  It's not as if someone with a wrecked career is going to get massive payouts or have a massive cash-pile to fall back on.

Let them and their unions argue about their wages, nobody champions me getting paid more in my job!

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