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ckn

The Remembrance Day Poppy

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I was going to title the thread "The BBC and the poppy" but it's all the TV media that does it... the BBC are probably the worst example of it though.

Is it just me or do the TV media just really not get it about the meaning of wearing the poppy?  Why does every single person on every single show have to wear the thing?

It should be a personal choice.  If someone chooses to wear a poppy and donate while buying their own then fine.  If someone chooses not to wear one and doesn't want to donate then that's fine as well.  Having the PR people sticking poppies on anyone going on TV is just ridiculous and lessens the whole subject.  I promise I won't judge a celebrity any more harshly because they choose not to wear a poppy every minute of the day, in fact I may respect them a bit more if they declined to wear one simply because their PR people said it would look good.

Also, have I missed the news brief that said you should now wear the thing before 1 Nov?

While I'm ranting... I promise that I'll try to be good this year and not grumble at any bucket rattler trying to get me to buy a poppy when I've left mine on my coat in the car or simply not bothered wearing it that day.  Last year I got a right telling off from the wife for grumbling at a pretentious middle-class woman outside Sainsburys when she tutted at me for not buying a poppy from her.  A few years ago I had a cow-orker colleague at work telling me off for not wearing one in the office when I had it on my outside coat in my cupboard, she didn't get my point when I said that it's what's in your head that counts rather than the token wearing of a bit of paper and plastic.

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All wrapped up with the need to celebrate the military and switch off rational thought.

 

I buy a red one and a white one every year.  And wear neither.

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There haven't been conscripts/national servicemen in conflicts since Korea (?), so for me the requirement for the Haig fund should diminish every year.  The need to remember the sacrifices and the bravery of those that have fought remains as high as ever.

 

I'm less inclined to feel the same for the professional combatants that we have now though.  That's just my take on it, they should either provide their own life cover, lobby their employer to do this for them (my preference), or not sign a contract of employment which they are not happy about because of the lack of pay and/or life cover.

 

CKN is right though.  Nobody on mainstream media would dare not wear a poppy.

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There haven't been conscripts/national servicemen in conflicts since Korea (?), so for me the requirement for the Haig fund should diminish every year.  The need to remember the sacrifices and the bravery of those that have fought remains as high as ever.

 

I'm less inclined to feel the same for the professional combatants that we have now though.  That's just my take on it, they should either provide their own life cover, lobby their employer to do this for them (my preference), or not sign a contract of employment which they are not happy about because of the lack of pay and/or life cover.

In principle I agree with you.  Far too much of the stuff the RBL do should be funded from general taxation.  The state has a duty of care to ex-employees injured in service, that they wear a military uniform and serve in dodgy areas is not the point.

 

There's a very valid socio-economic debate about recruitment to the armed forces and the catchment of people who join.  I read an excellent article about US military recruitment and how many people in poorer towns and cities see it as their only way to get a job, training for the future and security.  The article showed how the US government often deliberately over-recruits in some areas to help alleviate youth unemployment in sink towns, the problem was that it was effectively de-populating some towns with many of the best potential blue-collar workers moving away with the army and not coming back.

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TV folk (especially the BBC) probably mostly wear them out of choice, but also just so the usual frothy-lipped ranters can't get the oxygen of publicity by calling them traitors.

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TV folk (especially the BBC) probably mostly wear them out of choice, but also just so the usual frothy-lipped ranters can't get the oxygen of publicity by calling them traitors.

Imagine the reaction of the Mail?

 

I think the only person who openly doesn't wear a poppy on tv is C4's Peter Snow?

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Despite my political stance i always buy one and always attend the cenotaph ceremony. My son got badly injured in Afghanistan along with many others, and also to remember all those who made the sacrifice in all wars,

 

I take the points above though, you should be able to not wear a poppy without being tutted at or made to feel embarassed.

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There haven't been conscripts/national servicemen in conflicts since Korea (?), so for me the requirement for the Haig fund should diminish every year. The need to remember the sacrifices and the bravery of those that have fought remains as high as ever.

I'm less inclined to feel the same for the professional combatants that we have now though. That's just my take on it, they should either provide their own life cover, lobby their employer to do this for them (my preference), or not sign a contract of employment which they are not happy about because of the lack of pay and/or life cover.

CKN is right though. Nobody on mainstream media would dare not wear a poppy.

Not long after suez, Kenya, and Malaya actually

It's ridiculous and intolerant that a judgement should be made about a person on the basis of them wearing a poppy

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I tend not to get one these days, as they ended up ruffled or torn or lost, in my strange mind there needs to be an impeccable presentation about wearing a poppy.

 

It's always this time of year I also start to innocently wonder whether the First World War is still taught in school and when is "acceptable" for it to drop off the curriculum. I say this because earlier wars weren't really taught at all when I was at school.

 

And also I realise, 'crikey next year is 100 years since WWI started'.

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Being an ex-serviceman, I put loads in the tin collections but don't normally wear a poppy. I've never questioned myself as to why, being just one of those things. I do agree that when on television it should be a personal choice. 

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Generally don't wear one.  I hate poppy fascism.    Related is my disdain for celebrating 100 years since the start of World War one rather than celebrating the end of it.

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Generally don't wear one. I hate poppy fascism. Related is my disdain for celebrating 100 years since the start of World War one rather than celebrating the end of it.

I agree hundred percent john about poppy fascism although I do wear one until I lose it: sort if I'm wearing one because I want to: not because you say I should kind of style

I find the idea of commemorating or celebrating the start of a war with great distaste and suspicion

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Remembrance Day commemorates the date of the Armistice in 1918 that ended, not commenced, WW1.

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Remembrance Day commemorates the date of the Armistice in 1918 that ended, not commenced, WW1.

No

It is held on the corresponding date and or the nearest sunday to it

But it commemorates the dead of two world wars and other wars since

Before the end of world war 2 it was called armistice day: this was because the guns fell silent on that date day and time, but the war wasnt officially over until 1919. Many war memorials actually say 1914-19

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I buy a poppy and wear it if I come across someone selling them and I happen to have cash in my pocket at the time. Some years, neither happens.

 

Trouble is, due to the design of my coat collar, the poppy usually ends up looking pretty scruffy after quite a short time.

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Have you thought of wearing a different coat?

 

[it's my scientific background that left me with this fantastic ability to easily identify solutions to seemingly impossible problems].

;) 

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Have you thought of wearing a different coat?

 

[it's my scientific background that left me with this fantastic ability to easily identify solutions to seemingly impossible problems].

;) 

 

Futtocks just might have one coat!  :tongue:

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Futtocks just might have one coat!  :tongue:

I have two! I'm living the high life, I tell you! ;)  

 

But only one has a buttonhole and I don't like all the faffing around with pins.

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Related is my disdain for celebrating 100 years since the start of World War one rather than celebrating the end of it.

 

Agree 100% with this.

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But only one has a buttonhole and I don't like all the faffing around with pins.

 

The pins are never wide enough to hold the poppy straight. I use an enamel Wales badge to hold mine on.

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for the last couple of years I've sought out one of them wrist band things. Means I can contribute, as a former member of the RBL I really want to do, without having to worry about the actual poppy bit. Job done.

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Who is celebrating the start of the First World War?

If you can commemorate the end of the war then I don't see why you can't commemorate (not celebrate) the beginning.

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