Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Johnoco

Power Point Presentations

53 posts in this topic

How do you go about doing one? I know the gist of them but don't have a clue really.

 

Is this the one where you include a pic of the wife sunbathing and it's totally hilarious?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The secret of PowerPoint presentations: 3 slides maximum regardless of the content.

Slide 1: presentation title and your name as a placeholder until you start

Slide 2: a few bullet points of the main subject headings

Slide 3: a few bullet points as a summary

You only have more than that if you want to bore people to death. The more you have on the screen, the less they'll listen to you. I once did an afternoon seminar of 3.5hrs with just 3 slides.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The secret of PowerPoint presentations: 3 slides maximum regardless of the content.

Slide 1: presentation title and your name as a placeholder until you start

Slide 2: a few bullet points of the main subject headings

Slide 3: a few bullet points as a summary

You only have more than that if you want to bore people to death. The more you have on the screen, the less they'll listen to you. I once did an afternoon seminar of 3.5hrs with just 3 slides.

 

 

You talked non-stop for 3 and a half hours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You talked non-stop for 3 and a half hours?

Breaks on 45m and 45m from end with a longer break halfway through. It was a strategy presentation on a multinational merger explaining to the board all the complexities of doing such a merger, not something readily accomplishable over a short meeting with coffee!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not quite that frugal with my slides, quite often need some tables or figures to back up what I'm saying, be shared around after it as a record for governance. I do agree with keeping it to a minimum though, nothing more sleep inducing that someone reading word for word of a PowerPoint presentation.

Clip art and animation effects? Not if you want to be taken seriously.

My general question is to ask how what I'm putting on the slide adds to the information and/or clarity of what I'm saying. Unless it clearly and obviously does I'll leave it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stay away from animation and sound effects but use on of the themes. It makes the presentation look so much more professional and it just takes a couple of cliks to set up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Breaks on 45m and 45m from end with a longer break halfway through. It was a strategy presentation on a multinational merger explaining to the board all the complexities of doing such a merger, not something readily accomplishable over a short meeting with coffee!

 

Good man. Ive always found the balance between talking time and visuals hard to achieve. I must admit my pet hate is folk preparing slides and then just reading off them. Why?

 

Since starting my own business my aim has been to make as many meetings as possible stand-up rather than sit down. In your case though, that'd've been cruel. :sleep:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm presuming you prepare all this on a laptop or what? Lol at the luddite

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm presuming you prepare all this on a laptop or what? Lol at the luddite

Microsoft PowerPoint. Comes with most MS Office packages. I then usually use my own laptop to display on a projector but some places insist on using their own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm presuming you prepare all this on a laptop or what? Lol at the luddite

Yup, best to use your own laptop if at all possible. Fewer surprises that way. Have a back-up plan just in case you can't. And avoid reliance on USB sticks, they aren't reliable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm presuming you prepare all this on a laptop or what? Lol at the luddite

 

I always arrive with my PPP on a pen-drive and assume (in reality having checked) the company Im going to will have the hardware set up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, best to use your own laptop if at all possible. Fewer surprises that way. Have a back-up plan just in case you can't. And avoid reliance on USB sticks, they aren't reliable.

 

:tongue:  Just posted the opposite! TBH never had any problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good man. Ive always found the balance between talking time and visuals hard to achieve. I must admit my pet hate is folk preparing slides and then just reading off them. Why?

Since starting my own business my aim has been to make as many meetings as possible stand-up rather than sit down. In your case though, that'd've been cruel. :sleep:

If I'm trying to gloss over something then I'll put some graphics up with lots of text in it, they're so intent on reading that they don't listen!

If I want a typically noisy audience or one that I know will ask lots of questions at awkward times to shut up then I organise food. Breakfast presentations with bacon and egg rolls provided are a great way to have a silent presentation.

If I want undiluted attention for a minute then I click B followed by W in PowerPoint. It blacks the screen then whites it, that flash somehow makes people concentrate more while there's nothing on the screen.

The best way to get a clue about how good you are at presenting is to get someone to video you doing one then you sit back and cringe at it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:tongue: Just posted the opposite! TBH never had any problems.

Have both and an online copy as well! A good friend of mine went to NY to do a presentation and had his laptop and all other electronic goods confiscated at airport security as they wanted to check something. He couldn't wait and they said he could get them back on the way out the country. Cue him panicking and his wife rushing home from work to get another copy emailed to him from his home computer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all.

They're actually quite easy if you keep it simple. They only become difficult or complex if you add complex stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best way to get a clue about how good you are at presenting is to get someone to video you doing one then you sit back and cringe at it.

 

Ive had that a few times. It's an educational eye-opener that's for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The secret of PowerPoint presentations: 3 slides maximum regardless of the content.

Slide 1: presentation title and your name as a placeholder until you start

Slide 2: a few bullet points of the main subject headings

Slide 3: a few bullet points as a summary

You only have more than that if you want to bore people to death. The more you have on the screen, the less they'll listen to you. I once did an afternoon seminar of 3.5hrs with just 3 slides.

Sorry but how you can be so cut and dry is ridiculous - there is absolutely no way on earth i could do my presentations with 3 slides, 1 of which being a title page

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do NOT simply have a list of bullet points that you read out. Reading aloud is not a skill admired outside primary school and your audience can read faster than you can talk. PPPs are really best for displaying tables, charts, photos and other illustrations.

Do not 'open' the editable file in full view of the audience, it looks very unprofessional and when you cannot find it get you very flustered - create a show file and launch that, use control b to toggle display on and off screen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They're actually quite easy if you keep it simple. They only become difficult or complex if you add complex stuff.

There'll be no danger of that. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:tongue:  Just posted the opposite! TBH never had any problems.

I did.

 

I had to do a "microteach" at a local college. I took my laptop which they didn't let me use. So I whipped out my USB stick which their computer refused to recognise. Luckily I uploaded everything onto dropbox and could just download it.

 

This kind of thing has happened to me a few times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry but how you can be so cut and dry is ridiculous - there is absolutely no way on earth i could do my presentations with 3 slides, 1 of which being a title page

It's easy with practice.  When you have people reading what's on the screen they're not listening to you.  If you're trying to get content across on a screen then you're inviting them to ignore you completely while they process the content.  A presentation is probably the worst format possible to get long-term high-quality memory retention of your message but acts as a good starter before the later non-presentation information dissemination.

 

My second slide bullets are what I'd have as chapter or major section headings if writing a report.  If I'm doing a presentation on a major subject and have been asked to do a full service then I'll be submitting a later report using those headings as the major subjects.  My first minutes of the presentation are scene settings, "telling them what I'm going to tell them".  The bulk is the "telling them" bit.  The last 5 minutes of the presentation are the "telling them what I've told them" bit followed by Q&A.  Classic teacher training stuff...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed. The info in the bullet points should just be a brief summary of what you say or merely a list of things that you will talk about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The secret of PowerPoint presentations: 3 slides maximum regardless of the content.

Slide 1: presentation title and your name as a placeholder until you start

Slide 2: a few bullet points of the main subject headings

Slide 3: a few bullet points as a summary

You only have more than that if you want to bore people to death. The more you have on the screen, the less they'll listen to you. I once did an afternoon seminar of 3.5hrs with just 3 slides.

 

Amateur. At a recent client kick off meeting we managed a glorious 180 slides in a whole day meeting. The client were more than happy to let us get on with the project in the fear that we might visit them again and present at them for hours and hours.

 

In all seriousness the company I work for is now pushing for slideless meetings, the issue being that clients expect to see some sort of presentation in return for paying $10millions for projects so we are going for the moderate middle ground. It had got a bit out of hand as some teams just got silly and trying to keep everyone within their allocated time was becoming a battle.

 

Powerpoint is a useful tool, but like alcohol should be used in moderation. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's easy with practice. When you have people reading what's on the screen they're not listening to you. If you're trying to get content across on a screen then you're inviting them to ignore you completely while they process the content. A presentation is probably the worst format possible to get long-term high-quality memory retention of your message but acts as a good starter before the later non-presentation information dissemination.

My second slide bullets are what I'd have as chapter or major section headings if writing a report. If I'm doing a presentation on a major subject and have been asked to do a full service then I'll be submitting a later report using those headings as the major subjects. My first minutes of the presentation are scene settings, "telling them what I'm going to tell them". The bulk is the "telling them" bit. The last 5 minutes of the presentation are the "telling them what I've told them" bit followed by Q&A. Classic teacher training stuff...

Absolutely, if you're going to write slides - even in bullet points - that simply repeat what you're telling them, then you might as well give them a handout and all go to the pub!

Incidentally, I once did 3.5 hr presentation to a bunch of vicars. I made the mistake of telling them to stop me with any questions!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.