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Johnoco

Power Point Presentations

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How do you go about doing one? I know the gist of them but don't have a clue really.

 

Is this the one where you include a pic of the wife sunbathing and it's totally hilarious?

Is this with ref to a specific occasion like maybe a job interview ?

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Johnoco, on 13 Dec 2013 - 12:26 PM, said:snapback.png

How do you go about doing one? I know the gist of them but don't have a clue really.
 
Is this the one where you include a pic of the wife sunbathing and it's totally hilarious?

 

 

Is this with ref to a specific occasion like maybe a job interview ?

 

Whether thats's a good idea ot not depends on how good-looking his wife is I guess.

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In all seriousness the company I work for is now pushing for slideless meetings, the issue being that clients expect to see some sort of presentation in return for paying $10millions for projects so we are going for the moderate middle ground. It had got a bit out of hand as some teams just got silly and trying to keep everyone within their allocated time was becoming a battle.

 

Powerpoint is a useful tool, but like alcohol should be used in moderation. 

 

I hear that. Too may presentations become a showcase for the capabilities of PP rather than the content.

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It's easy with practice.  When you have people reading what's on the screen they're not listening to you.  If you're trying to get content across on a screen then you're inviting them to ignore you completely while they process the content.  A presentation is probably the worst format possible to get long-term high-quality memory retention of your message but acts as a good starter before the later non-presentation information dissemination.

 

My second slide bullets are what I'd have as chapter or major section headings if writing a report.  If I'm doing a presentation on a major subject and have been asked to do a full service then I'll be submitting a later report using those headings as the major subjects.  My first minutes of the presentation are scene settings, "telling them what I'm going to tell them".  The bulk is the "telling them" bit.  The last 5 minutes of the presentation are the "telling them what I've told them" bit followed by Q&A.  Classic teacher training stuff...

I disagree

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I hear that. Too may presentations become a showcase for the capabilities of PP rather than the content.

 

We are also moving away from the whole presenter stands at the front thing and trying to encourage a more informal discussion in a 'round table' sort of format (no references to King Arthur please). Problem is when you have a very talkative audience (...Americans) then trying to stay on schedule is a challenge, but this way you get to ensure everyone is awake and paying attention and people who might not normally speak up feel less conspicuous in this setting.

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when at uni, we had a limit of 12 slides per presentation, which is enough to get points across. That included title page and reference page, so 10 for content

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We are also moving away from the whole presenter stands at the front thing and trying to encourage a more informal discussion in a 'round table' sort of format (no references to King Arthur please). Problem is when you have a very talkative audience (...Americans) then trying to stay on schedule is a challenge, but this way you get to ensure everyone is awake and paying attention and people who might not normally speak up feel less conspicuous in this setting.

I developed a technique for that as I have to deal with a lot of Americans and Canadians these days.  I have a crib card in front of me with one line main headings and all the sub-headings I want to cover to ensure I get through the content, I then have them marked from 1-5 with 1 being "must cover" and 5 being "silent audience, bonus content".  If I get of distractions or question breaks then I start skipping those marked 5 and 4, the more stops I get then I start skipping those marked 3.  I've never had to cut a 2 yet but it'll happen one day.

 

It's a bit of a learned experience working out whether interruptions from different audiences in different countries are positive or not, my experience is:

- if Germans interrupt you with questions then you've got them interested, if they don't then you've lost them.

- if Americans or Canadians interrupt you then it could mean anything, if they don't then they hate you.

- if South Africans interrupt you then you're messing things up and they're into critique mode, if they don't then you're doing well.

- if Australians interrupt you then you're either doing very well or very poorly, if they don't then it's either OK or deathly boring.

- if the Spanish interrupt you then it's the afternoon, if they don't it's the morning

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It's a bit of a learned experience working out whether interruptions from different audiences in different countries are positive or not, my experience is:

- if Germans interrupt you with questions then you've got them interested, if they don't then you've lost them.

- if Americans or Canadians interrupt you then it could mean anything, if they don't then they hate you.

- if South Africans interrupt you then you're messing things up and they're into critique mode, if they don't then you're doing well.

- if Australians interrupt you then you're either doing very well or very poorly, if they don't then it's either OK or deathly boring.

- if the Spanish interrupt you then it's the afternoon, if they don't it's the morning

 

Oh yes, national stereotypes really do exist.

 

I had a meeting out in Madrid in October, we were presenting to Germans, Dutch, Spanish, Hungarians, Czechs and Greeks.

 

The Dutch were by far the most prone to interrupting with questions, the Czechs were most fun in the bar afterwards, the Spanish never came back after lunch and we later found out they went shopping (or perhaps for a sneaky siesta), I think the Germans mostly felt like they were above us all and apart from a few terse comments and questions mostly just glared at the presenter or kept disappearing outside for a fag.

 

We've got Russians, Ukrainians, Italians and probably some others for another training session in January. My only previous experience of Russians is they are almost as vocal as Americans only with a more sinister accent. The meeting is in Prague so at least the beer afterwards should be good.

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Is this with ref to a specific occasion like maybe a job interview ?

:) Yeah... I don't think they are expecting a ckn 3.5 hour marathon ;) but I don't want to stand there like a div either. Thanks for all the tips and help.

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:) Yeah... I don't think they are expecting a ckn 3.5 hour marathon ;)

That's the best time to catch them in my experience. It's always pure joy when they see the slide counter and there are over a hundred. This is when it is best to quickly sprint to the door so you can lock it and take the key.

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what the hell are you all on about?

 

Ah, the ghost of workplaces past. :rolleyes: 

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present actualy, and work as well, not occupation- ever marvelled at some of the city centre scaffold structures?

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It's always pure joy when they see the slide counter and there are over a hundred.

 

or for a bit of fun go with the 5 slides presentation, but add 120 blank slides on the end then look for the panic in their faces when you load your presentation up and they see the slide count at 125.

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Don't forget the shiniest golden rule of all. Check the equipment works before the audience gets there and make sure even the person at the back with lousy eyesight can see the slides

I've been to so many presentations where you can see the bullet point (as they are read out lol) but the key graph or diagram is unreadable and the whole thing is a waste of time.

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It's easy with practice.  When you have people reading what's on the screen they're not listening to you.  If you're trying to get content across on a screen then you're inviting them to ignore you completely while they process the content.  A presentation is probably the worst format possible to get long-term high-quality memory retention of your message but acts as a good starter before the later non-presentation information dissemination.

 

My second slide bullets are what I'd have as chapter or major section headings if writing a report.  If I'm doing a presentation on a major subject and have been asked to do a full service then I'll be submitting a later report using those headings as the major subjects.  My first minutes of the presentation are scene settings, "telling them what I'm going to tell them".  The bulk is the "telling them" bit.  The last 5 minutes of the presentation are the "telling them what I've told them" bit followed by Q&A.  Classic teacher training stuff...

 

For strategy talks, I entirely agree.  If you want people to understand a concept, it is best that you talk and they listen (not really taking many notes).

 

If you are presenting new data and findings, then you will need illustrations, pictures and graphs (not tables).

 

I fear you are rather more advanced than the OP and your advice is excellent for an experienced speaker.  For a less experienced speaker, slide are useful.  They should have few words, but functions in two ways: firstly illustrate the point to the audience, secondly remind the speaker what he is going to talk about.

 

A title and a picture are excellent for a less confident speaker.

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My new job involves giving PPP, they  are prepared for all the instructors by the company we work for then we have the computors and projector sent by courier to where we are delivering the presentation we setit up , deliver the presentation  and leave in a safe area for them to pick up at a later date.

I normally ask them to email the presentation so I can download it to my memorystick just in case

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I try and engage with my students, drifting away from the scripted presentation just enough to keep them awake & interested.

 

It was tricky though last Friday, as it was fri 13th(!), and there was a Psychiatrist in my class for BLS with AED at 2nd level

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You can do no better than learn from

how to give presentations.

That is just hilarious!

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You can do no better than learn from this guy how to give presentations.

It all depends on the audience. Just because I have no idea what he is talking about doesn't mean that it's not a brilliantly coherent talk if the audience are all engineering graduates.

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On the subject of iffy presentations... university was a gold-mine of useless presenters.

 

I remember one of the lecturers used to come into the lecture theatre, stand at the lectern with notes in front of her and read them without moving or looking up.  The only time her hands moved from the side of the lectern was to turn over a new page of her notes.  She used to read at break-neck speed and would eject anyone daring to using dictophones, she saw them as disrespectful to her.  Outside of the lecture hall, she was a very friendly and eloquent person but somehow she had it in her head that this was an effective teaching method for presenting complex information.  Thankfully we had another tutor in charge of our tutorial group who'd tell us what to read to cover the ground, it was an utter waste of time even bothering to attend the lectures.

 

Another would tell us what he believed the law should be interspersed with genuine laws occasionally.  It didn't help us that he couldn't differentiate between fact and his opinion, he set us study homework based on his opinions and how we'd change things but this wasn't the point of the bloody course!  I just couldn't understand this module at all and it ended up as the lowest score of my degree, the exam was all about the facts and study of EU law when our heads were full of his idiot opinions.

 

Yet another would veer off, Billy Connolly style, into wild, barely-linked anecdotes then find he ran out of time to cover the genuine stuff and ended every lecture with a huge reading list to catch up with what he didn't cover.

 

The worst of all was a weird module called "Contemporary Legal Thought" where the head lecturer and our tutorial group leader was a rabid feminist who had spent far too long living at the Greenham Common camp.  Over one half of the course was about feminist rights with far too much time spent covering Catherine McKinnon and Andrea Dworkin, if you haven't had the pleasure of reading any of their stuff then you're in a far better place for your ignorance, don't correct this lack of knowledge, I beg you.  This was a compulsory course and there were no real coursebooks available so I had to try to listen and comprehend abysmal presentations given twice a week by a frothy mouthed old woman ranting about men subjugating women everywhere.  Being the awkward sod that I am, I used to quote Maggie Thatcher to her in tutorial groups, I never let on once that I seriously disliked everything about Mad Maggie but it was fun asking about Maggie when she went on about women never getting into positions of power and seeing her go all red in the face trying to rebut it successfully.

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During my training we used to have a science lecture just after lunch on Mondays from a lady from Blackpool College, who used to walk in, say "Good Afternoon" and then spend the next hour writing facts on the white board with her back to us.

One afternoon the lecture was moved to a coffee room with comfortable chairs, and a warm radiator that I was next to, after a liquid lunch. She was droning on as usual, about the Periodic table and I fell asleep, she tuned the OHP off and I got a nudge from one of my fellow trainees, and she started asking me questions about the Periodic table and chemical symbols, and atomic weights etc, as I did 'O'-level Physics and Chemistry and got 'A' at both I was able to answer her questions, she said she thought I was asleep, and I replied that I had just closed my eyes to concentrate on what she was saying. As she went back to her droning the fellow trainee told me I was snoring!

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