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l'angelo mysterioso

I hope this helps

51 posts in this topic

The main reason is that I've never seen such a response from the forum before about a post.  

 

Nonsense, I don't believe that for one minute. Some of were here in the days of Paley, Clive Woody, Frank Machin, League Freak and Dally the Messenger!!!!

 

We know better Mr Moderator!!!!

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CKN didn't say he was a moron, he said he was being moronic, there is a difference.

I agree there is but I wasn't referring to CKN's post but to one that was deleted.

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The main reason is that I've never seen such a response from the forum before about a post.  One formal report, 8 PMs and someone even sending me a text on my mobile to ensure I saw the post, all within minutes of it being posted.  Back that with my instinctive reaction to it and I decided it was worth a strong response.  I decided to treat this the same way I would if someone were ignorant or uneducated about another disability and posted some insensitive stuff.

 

If people wish for me to put the posts back then I'll reconsider but all it would take is one person to say they should stay deleted and I won't change my mind.

The thing about a physical disability is that it is easy to understand. People who are less than sympathetic to someone who is handicapped deserve both barrels.

 

But mental illness has no physical signs. It is very difficult for someone who has never had depression to understand it. I'd even say that it is very difficult for someone with depression to understand it. Hence the video that Chris linked to.

 

People very often tell the depressed to "cheer up" or similar. In most cases they are not being rude, they are just trying to be helpful (but not succeeding).

 

As for the strong response. I think people take offence too easily. People especially take offence on behalf of others far too easily. When people say things that you think are offensive, unless they are a total meathead, then you can discuss it with them like adults - politely.

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I agree there is but I wasn't referring to CKN's post but to one that was deleted.

 

I can't think which one that was, but that doesn't matter. I thought Craig's response was the correct one for the reason I stated in my earlier post.

 

A very useful thread for some people was in danger of being lost because one person thought it was a good subject to show their ignorance on.

 

My last statement on the BB side of this.

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Craig was right to remove the posts he did. The person who posted them has a long and inglorious track record on here of similar disruptive contributions and has been tolerated well past their sell-by date. This was not a one-off, an isolated incident, a case of genuine ignorance awaiting enlightenment. This was the straw that broke the camel's back. The forum is now one troll lighter as a result. If anyone has a problem with this, PM me about it, to avoid this thread being further disrupted.

 

Back on topic now, please.

 

Thanks.

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The late Terry Newton would probably have appreciated that video.

 

I too suffer from the "Black Dog", although I call them dark days, many of which I experienced since may 1 2011. Losing my job after 29 years, and not getting any regular income, my partner moving back to London to work, not being able to provide for my 5 year old, all adds to the dark days.

 

One of the things that lifts me is coming on here and seeing you lot bickering every day, and going down to the beach, now and again, the ozone smell coming off the Channel lifts my spirits, as does my daughter.

 

I'm 51, I live in a town with high unemployment, but I keep going.

 

I have to, for Leilani Freya Hesketh

 

Thank You for being there, ALL of you, Merry Christmas

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Sharon has just got home and though she wasn't aware of the video she did point out that the phrase "My Black Dog" comes from Winston Churchill who suffered from depression.

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A very descriptive video, but I never did get the 'black dog' thing. To me a black dog (or any colour of dog) represents interest, vitality, exercise, affection, fun, positivity - in fact everything I associate with good mental health.

True.

 

AFAIK Churchill was the first person to use this metaphor. As far as I can tell, the "dog" bit is because it follows you around. Or possibly because black dogs can appear in literature e.g. the hound of the Baskervilles as something to be frightened of.

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The late Terry Newton would probably have appreciated that video.

 

I too suffer from the "Black Dog", although I call them dark days, many of which I experienced since may 1 2011. Losing my job after 29 years, and not getting any regular income, my partner moving back to London to work, not being able to provide for my 5 year old, all adds to the dark days.

 

One of the things that lifts me is coming on here and seeing you lot bickering every day, and going down to the beach, now and again, the ozone smell coming off the Channel lifts my spirits, as does my daughter.

 

I'm 51, I live in a town with high unemployment, but I keep going.

 

I have to, for Leilani Freya Hesketh

 

Thank You for being there, ALL of you, Merry Christmas

You'd be amazed how many men who spend much of their free time on the internet arguing about trivia on the Internet suffer from poor mental health. Not just depression but anxiety disorders (I've also got one of those) and autism.

 

On a more personal note. Freya is one of those names on a come back. The first time I came across a girl called "Freya" I was quite stunned but it's really quite common now.

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Some of you may be interested in James Davies' book 'Cracked' and in his other books.

 

http://jamesdaviesauthor.com/books/cracked/

It's unfair to judge it because I haven't read it but a book that essentially sets out to debunk psychiatry is something that worries me. There is enough stigma about mental illness already and the mentally ill often have the view that medicine and therapy can't help them.

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It's unfair to judge it because I haven't read it but a book that essentially sets out to debunk psychiatry is something that worries me. There is enough stigma about mental illness already and the mentally ill often have the view that medicine and therapy can't help them.

 

Davies believes that people who experience mental health problems get a poor deal from much of the dominant Western approach to mental health. He isn't dismissive of mental distress and he works part time as a Psychotherapist.

 

There is a tradition of people within the mental health world who are critical of current practice, or aspects of it. Such criticisms are also commonly made by people who have been in the system as patients.

 

The book is well worth a read, although it might make you rather cross and it is probably not advisable to read it if you are feeling down.

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I think one of the reasons that some people dismiss depression with a "get over it" is because some people "swing the leg" about it.

This leaves genuine sufferers tarred with the same brush similar to genuine benefit claimants and those with massive flat screens and Sky.

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I think one of the reasons that some people dismiss depression with a "get over it" is because some people "swing the leg" about it.

This leaves genuine sufferers tarred with the same brush similar to genuine benefit claimants and those with massive flat screens and Sky.

 

Really?

 

Due to the stigma and shame still attached (by some) to depressive illness I bet there are at least 10 people doing the opposite, trying to hide or play down their condition, to every 1 "swinging the lead".

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Really?

 

Due to the stigma and shame still attached (by some) to depressive illness I bet there are at least 10 people doing the opposite, trying to hide or play down their condition, to every 1 "swinging the lead".

Exactly this point.  This is why there are the mental health campaigns within our sport to de-stigmatise it and make it less of an issue for people to speak out about it.  Even then, it's seen by many as a sign of weakness, "worthy" of both open and unconscious discrimination.

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Really?

 

Due to the stigma and shame still attached (by some) to depressive illness I bet there are at least 10 people doing the opposite, trying to hide or play down their condition, to every 1 "swinging the lead".

Agree with that, because of reactions such as the one that saw BB removed, people see depression as a sign of weakness and that proper men don't suffer from this, which is clearly nonsense.

 

I think the timing of the this thread is particularly pertinent with the Christmas period being a bad time for people with depression. A few years back a friend committed suicide just before christmas because he couldn't afford presents for his daughter. He had been suffering from depression and this was the final straw. It is an illogical disease that makes no sense to those who do not suffer from this. It's easy for me to say I am sure his daughter would much rather have had her dad there at christmas than have presents, but for somebody with depression this isn't obvious or easy to accept.

 

Just the other day a local man with depression tried to end it all by stopping his car on a level crossing and waiting for the next train. He survived and hopefully he will embrace his chance at life but I am sure it will not be easy.

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I think one of the reasons that some people dismiss depression with a "get over it" is because some people "swing the leg" about it.

This leaves genuine sufferers tarred with the same brush similar to genuine benefit claimants and those with massive flat screens and Sky.

People swing the lead about all sorts if health issues

Your comment is irrelevant

This video comes the closest I have ever seen to communicating to people what suffering from depression means and is like

Even so it doesn't quite manage it. The reason for this is that it is impossible. Depression is an existential condition. It is about the way a person sees themselves

It gets dismissed because it is invisible, and almost impossible to empathise with. I have only ever known fellow sufferers to be able to do this

The way a person who lives with depression sees themselves is in a catastrophically negative way

It's manifested by overwhelming guilt, feelings of uselessness and inadequacy and worthless ness that take over your life... To an extent that you are powerless. That is a major reason that people self harm...hurting yourself is something that you have power and control over and for that reason brings a short lived relief.

It has nothing to do with being sad, fed up, down, blue or whatever

It is not caused by stress, although stressful situations can precipitate an episode

I have worked in stressful, dangerous even jobs for most of my working career, in psychiatric nursing and education and flourished for most of that time

I taught for the last fifteen years of my working life in a secure unit for highly disturbed young offenders

Over the years I tailored my work environment so that I was in full control of it. It was my turf with my systems my standards and so on. It worked very well for everyone especially for the boys.

This was rent asunder when the unit was rebuilt with a new education facility. My work environment was vastly improved materially but I was completely freaked out by it. It was not what I had spent years developing and I couldn't handle it

For a long time everything was great on the surface. The kids behaved we did these massive projects and all was cool. But deep down I knew that my work wasn't valid in education terms I kept no records didn't assess progress or anything that you are supposed to do it was all window dressing and I was descending deeper and deeper into an abyss

One morning I was sat in the staff room waiting for assembly the head of education came over to me and asked for my records

Of course there were none

I stood up and told him to stuff his records and his job up his ###### ###### and stormed out if the place leaving every security door and air lock open in my wake with increasing numbers of staff chasing after me until I escaped through the foyer.

I walked home feeling exalted, liberated, victorious.

Luckily my wife was in

I sat down and told her what had happened and she immediately rang our gp as I mentally collapsed before here eyes the exaltation escaping from my being like air from a burst balloon

I had been fighting depression for a long time and not realised it. I'd missed the signs as had those around me. I'd become withdrawn, selfish, lacking in compassion, negative, easily brought to anger, morose. It had happened gradually But people had assumed it was me just being me

The NHS , my family, my friends...those that I now know to be my friends and not the ones who pretended they were have been wonderful and I owe my life as well as the progress I have made to them: apart from a corrupt consultant who almost destroyed me

I can co exist with the black dog Most of the time thanks to them

Sorry for boring everyone

My intention has been to give people insight

Ask me anything on here or by pm

Chris

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I think I've been misunderstood. My uncle has depression brought on by a head trauma when he was knock off his bike. Because his physical wounds have healed some people assume he should be over it by now. My family have spend plenty of time explaining how they are completely wrong.

Apologies for any offence my first post may have caused. Not intended.

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I think I've been misunderstood. My uncle has depression brought on by a head trauma when he was knock off his bike. Because his physical wounds have healed some people assume he should be over it by now. My family have spend plenty of time explaining how they are completely wrong.

Apologies for any offence my first post may have caused. Not intended.

Mate there's no offence taken

And I wasn't having a go

We are jut talking and listening here

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Guys,thanks for this thread,my eldest son has been diagnosed with depression which is why I haven't been on much and the video explains it so well and offers great ways to help deal with depression.I've forwarded it on to him and I'm sure we'll discuss it at length.

Thanks guys and merry christmas.

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Really?

 

Due to the stigma and shame still attached (by some) to depressive illness I bet there are at least 10 people doing the opposite, trying to hide or play down their condition, to every 1 "swinging the lead".

It is often said that depression is something you cannot possibly imagine until you go through it.  THe downside of this, is that we cannot compare symptoms easily.  Just as there are a group of women in Britian who would claim a monopoly on having the 'flu, so it can be that depression is something you are not allowed to claim.  This can be a problem.  The video is rather good at that.

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True.

 

AFAIK Churchill was the first person to use this metaphor. As far as I can tell, the "dog" bit is because it follows you around. Or possibly because black dogs can appear in literature e.g. the hound of the Baskervilles as something to be frightened of.

It goes back further than Churchill. Samuel Johnson used the term.

 

Here's a bit of reasearch on the matter (PDF)

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Thanks for posting the video Chris. Aged just eight, our doctor found a tumour the size of a melon attached to our Stuart's spine and pressing on his lung, resulting in major surgery. Thankfully, he survived but we had to live through nine months of uncertainty. Sadly, little Andrew and Lindsay didn't make it. As for me, my world fell apart as summed up by the following.

 

Living on the dark side

 

Deep within the darkened chasm

Light unable to penetrate

My anchor long since gone

Falling, drifting, isolated in darkness

No terra firma have I

A smile hard to give

No warm heart inside

Grasping, clutching

Hands outstretched

But nothing can I hold

Days drift by

Blue skies above

Yet darkness won't leave my soul

The sun sheds no warmth

Stars without a twinkle

My mind a wrinkled mess

Depressive roots strangling

Eating away at my inner strength

Life stuck on red

Please God, where is green for go?

 

My eldest brother hung himself seven years ago while a close relative has gone through a nightmare over several years at the evil hands of depression. Just last week, a relative's brother attempted suicide while another family member is going through hell.

 

I eventually recovered although it took some fight.  

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Excellent video.

Mental health is never a joke.

I'm not sure of the statistics but I think more people than not will have related issues in their lifetimes.

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