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ckn

Food banks

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Obviously Phil you have had your own nasty experience in life over religion, but don't tar every religious person the same. Having run away from a violent, alcoholic father and who went on to murder a baby from a second marriage, my two aunties as well as two grandparents took six of us in for over 13 years. Both aunties were religious but had hearts of gold towards everyone. I would go as far to say that my auntie Ivy was one in a million, never ever complaining while giving her all to family, friends and Girl Guides. Even a car accident that crushed both legs didn't stop her helping others, even to hobbling 400 yards to the local shops to shop for her elderly neighbours. An angel in every sense and never ever dictated to us about her religious beliefs. A truly amazing generous person and loved by all. Today, I still tend to their graves in sincere gratitude. What might have been otherwise as our family could have been split up? 

 

 

She sounds like a wonderful person and the line "never ever dictated to us about her religious beliefs" is the defining one to me. The ones who do dictate belief are the self-righteous hypocrites I've no time for.

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I disagree that there has been a 'strong vein of self-righteousness' running through this thread.  All that has happened is that a few posters, including myself, have questioned - and rightly IMO - the priorities of parents towards their children when money is tight.  I personally call that responsibility.  Parents do have responsibility for and over their children.  Parenting is supposed to be sacrificial.  That means putting the children's needs before your own.  And the needs for food, water, clothing and shelter are primary needs and should never be compromised.  That isn't to say that parents should not relax or have treats but surely such things should be with what is left over rather than as a priority? 

 

Likewise there were no lectures on Christian morality; just the valid point that people of faith have been supporting those in need in this country for centuries, way before the state got involved.  That doesn't discount the reality of abuse within faith communities.  There is abuse wherever you put human beings together.  There have been numerous stories of abuse within state sector provision in recent years.  Where there is abuse, or neglect, or lack of responsibility towards dependents (whether young, old, disabled or able bodied), there should be accountability.  That is equally the case for faith organisations as it is for the state - and for parents/carers.

 

 

Oh thanks I don't feel at all patronised.

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Oh thanks I don't feel at all patronised.

What you feel is beyond my control I'm afraid.  I was simply countering what you said.

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She sounds like a wonderful person and the line "never ever dictated to us about her religious beliefs" is the defining one to me. The ones who do dictate belief are the self-righteous hypocrites I've no time for.

Why does it make them hypocrites for believing in certain things?

Let's assume a convent or monastery has a soup kitchen (as virtually all of them do) but they insist that nobody gets a meal if they are passed out of their head and/or being aggressive. Isn't the onus on the hungry person to accept their charity and behave accordingly or not. Either way I don't see how it makes them hypocrites.

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I think I might be the only person on this thread who has managed to disagree with everyone.  Do I win a prize?

 

Volunteer to be a moderator. Craig is showing dangerous signs of common sense and impartiality. I for one don't like it.

;):tongue:

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She sounds like a wonderful person and the line "never ever dictated to us about her religious beliefs" is the defining one to me. The ones who do dictate belief are the self-righteous hypocrites I've no time for.

 

And I agree Phil about certain people over religion. I once journeyed by car to London from St Helens with my boss and glad to get back home. He never let up preaching to me. I met up again last year to do some gardening work at his home and endured four days of the same. Likewise, I know of another person who goes on and on about declining church attendance yet never practices what she preaches. At the end of the day, there is good and bad across all sections of society. 

 

As for responsible adults, there was a truly shocking television news clip showing a man holding a child in front of storm-battering seas. It beggars belief.

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looks like they could be getting a whole lot busier in 2014: Government to stop funding for low-income families facing emergencies

Not quite true.  The Government is to cut its subsidy to local authorities for the provision of such welfare support.  It will be up to local authorities to manage their budgets in order to be in a position to offer such help.  The squeeze is on local authorities, which is where most of the debt problems originated under Labour.

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Not quite true.  The Government is to cut its subsidy to local authorities for the provision of such welfare support.  It will be up to local authorities to manage their budgets in order to be in a position to offer such help.  The squeeze is on local authorities, which is where most of the debt problems originated under Labour.

 

It doesn't matter where it is getting cut from, it is still getting cut. And as a result more vulnerable people will lose a vital life-line. 

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It doesn't matter where it is getting cut from, it is still getting cut. And as a result more vulnerable people will lose a vital life-line. 

I think when discussing cuts it is important to report on something accurately, which neither the link title nor the initial paragraphs of the Gruniad article did.

 

It's quite possible that vulnerable people will not lose a lifeline.  We would need to find out about individual council budgets to find out whether that will be the case.  St Helens Council, for example, have been massive bleaters about The Cuts ever since the coalition came into power, yet miraculously they have found the money to buy a completely new fleet of recycling trucks along with all the recycling items needed for residents to recycle; they have put in a bid to purchase one of the town's shopping centres (although they were outbid in the end); and they have recently notified us of plans to turn a local running track (which featured in the film Chariots of Fire) into a car park, a new build that would require considerable financial outlay I should think.  Yet all the while they continue to bleat about The Cuts.  My guess is that like so many local councils (I have worked for four of them, including St Helens), they have been incredibly wasteful and taken for granted tax payers money for too many years now.  I would like to see evidence of budget plans within local authorities before making any judgment call on whether needy people will suffer as a result of this decrease in subsidy (and remember, we don't know how much the subsidy accounted for spending in this area in the first place).

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