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Wolford6

BBC to axe a TV Channel?

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The BBC3 and BBC4 frequencies are used for CBBC and CBeebies during the day, even though they have a different channel number on your EPG.

 

Those two channels should be sacrosanct.  It's wonderful to have advert free TV for children IMO.

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Seems a very sensible plan!

BBC3 is aimed at a yoof audience, who are the most likely to watch more TV programmes online than any other, so yes.

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BBC3 is aimed at a yoof audience, who are the most likely to watch more TV programmes online than any other, so yes.

 

It does seem to make sense.  I can't imagine my daughter ever really watching TV in the way we did as kids - at set times, dictated to by the channel.

 

I have to admit that we watch less and less live TV.   We're currently working our way through the Netflix catalogue.  Between that, the downloads off Sky, the Iplayer and 4OD probably the only thing we actually watch live is sport.   And even that tends to be on a fifteen or twenty minute delay to avoid ads and the half time dribble.

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I must be old-fashioned! To me, television is something of the moment, and I very rarely resort to iPlayer and the like for something I have missed, unless it is something I really really wanted to watch.

 

Radio, on the other hand, is different. I've spent plenty of time searching out episodes of things I've missed, especially classic comedy shows.

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I must be old-fashioned! To me, television is something of the moment, and I very rarely resort to iPlayer and the like for something I have missed, unless it is something I really really wanted to watch.

 

Radio, on the other hand, is different. I've spent plenty of time searching out episodes of things I've missed, especially classic comedy shows.

 

It's only since I got a set of Airplay speakers at Christmas that I've really found radio to work on the internet.  The new BBC radio app is really good and the whole things works like a dream out of the box.  Frankly, there isn't much radio outside the BBC that's worth a damn, although some podcasts are quite good.

 

Fast enough broadband to make it possible for someone to watch TV while someone else in the house worked or listened to the radio only arrived in our village late last summer.   Before that, the radio would drop out if an email arrived and TV programmes needed to download for twenty minutes before you could start watching them. 

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Frankly, there isn't much radio outside the BBC that's worth a damn, although some podcasts are quite good.

There are some good classical music stations online, from both Europe and the USA. My Dad's a total convert.

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Just remembered reading this in October, which could be what will take up BBC3's evening space on the national multiplex: BBC One to launch new +1 channel.

A +1 service is one area where the BBC haven't gone yet, compared to ITV, C4 etc.

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The BBC3 and BBC4 frequencies are used for CBBC and CBeebies during the day, even though they have a different channel number on your EPG.

Frequencies? How quaint in this digital world.

 

Still making BBC3 on line is at least a part solution. I wonder how it  will affect programme costs.

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I must be old-fashioned! To me, television is something of the moment, and I very rarely resort to iPlayer and the like for something I have missed, unless it is something I really really wanted to watch.

 

Me too. 

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Frequencies? How quaint in this digital world.

 

Still making BBC3 on line is at least a part solution. I wonder how it  will affect programme costs.

Frequencies are quite important in the digital world. 

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It's only since I got a set of Airplay speakers at Christmas that I've really found radio to work on the internet.  The new BBC radio app is really good and the whole things works like a dream out of the box.  Frankly, there isn't much radio outside the BBC that's worth a damn, although some podcasts are quite good.

 

Fast enough broadband to make it possible for someone to watch TV while someone else in the house worked or listened to the radio only arrived in our village late last summer.   Before that, the radio would drop out if an email arrived and TV programmes needed to download for twenty minutes before you could start watching them. 

 

 Frankly, there isn't much radio outside the BBC that's worth a damn, although some podcasts are quite good.

 

http://prairiehome.publicradio.org/

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Frequencies are quite important in the digital world. 

 

quite so, but not in the conventional sense of one channel per frequency. http://www.ukfree.tv/fullstory.php?storyid=1107051920

 

However, the point is that by switching  from terrestrial to on-line transmission is not going to make much dent in the costs, in my view. For the BBC to recover the £100 million it wasted on the DMI , on excessive pay and pay-offs etc, it will have to reduce the costs of producing  content. 

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quite so, but not in the conventional sense of one channel per frequency. http://www.ukfree.tv/fullstory.php?storyid=1107051920

 

However, the point is that by switching  from terrestrial to on-line transmission is not going to make much dent in the costs, in my view. For the BBC to recover the £100 million it wasted on the DMI , on excessive pay and pay-offs etc, it will have to reduce the costs of producing  content. 

 

Online production tends to be lower quality and shorter and with less in the way of repeat fees to pay out.

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Frequencies? How quaint in this digital world.

Okay, they share the same multiplex slot on each of the UK broadcast regions.

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It's a start then...one small step for common sense, one giant step still needed from the BBC.....

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Okay, they share the same multiplex slot on each of the UK broadcast regions.

 

  That's better...it rolls off the tongue so much easier  more easily!  :tongue:

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I have a brilliant idea that will save this channel. Why not claw back the £100 million wasted on the failed  DMI project from those responsible?

 

Actually, the whole thing sounds like sabre-rattling ..there must be some sort of licence review coming up.

 

Still , thing are looking  up at BBC News And Current Affairs. Susannah Reid is leaving to join ITV!!!

Why not get the government to reinstate the Foreign Office paying for the World Service as has always been the case, that is until Mr Murdoch got involved. Murdoch is getting his way.  What a surprise Dave is doing Rupe a favour.  No doubt it'll be returned in spades when the election's called.

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Strange, that.For as we all now know, its your role model moneybags Blair who is the one who is closest to the  Murdochs.

 

“Whatever why I’m so so missing Tony. Because he is so so charming and his clothes are so good. He has such good body and he has really really good legs Butt . . . And he is slim tall and good skin. Pierce blue eyes which I love. Love his eyes. Also I love his power on the stage . . . and what else and what else and what else . . . ”

 

http://www.vanityfair.com/society/2014/03/wendi-deng-note-tony-blair

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<snip>

 

Hmm, is there any basis of truth to that, or is it just a bit of (potential) libellous trolling by VF (and because you have repeated it here, you and TRL)? :rolleyes:

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Hmm, is there any basis of truth to that, or is it just a bit of (potential) libellous trolling by VF (and because you have repeated it here, you and TRL)? :rolleyes:

It's widely reported that Tony Blair was a factor in the Murdochs' divorce. Wendi seemed to have a "thing" about him. No-one has reported it as having been an "affair" but there was something going on even if it was just in the one direction.

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Yes, Murdoch cosied up to the Blair régime, but very suddenly changed tack to support the Conservatives as soon as it became apparent exactly how doomed Gordon Brown was. And the latter were always more likely to attack the BBC anyway.

 

Only time will tell if this BBC3 decision is just the thin end of the wedge.

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The problem I have with this decision is that BBC2/4 serve a very similar, if not identical, audience. What makes it worse is that BBC2 spends a lot of time airing repeats and also news programmes that are also shown on other BBC channels. BBC3, by contrast, serves a distinct audience not catered for elsewhere by the BBC.

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