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jus de couchon

International expansion

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The optism of the world cup seems to be evaporating very quickly.However the lack of planning with fixtures is self inflicted.Surely it is not too difficult to have fixtures planned 3 or 4 years in advance.

The main consolation I take is compared to where we are 10 to 15 years ago and the number of countries having at least minimal activity.Again it all comes down to money and the commitment to spread the gospel.

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And most of the money is created by the two professional leagues. But what's in it for them to spend that money on outsiders? Talent? Maybe. Does it pay off to go down that route? Probably not. 

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There will be no new powerhouses in RL until we have an RLIF with some kind of power.

Agreed. But how to wrestle power from the nation that, to be fair, has done more for it's own competition than anyone else?

Great Britain/England is making a mess of it's own backyard, so how can we expect them to improve the expansion of the game?

I do feel disappointed at times, we have some of the most backward thinking supporters in World Sport.

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The small profit made from the RLWC is unlikely to make a significant difference to any future planning at International level.The unpalatable truth is "organic" growth is the only sustainable way to plan ahead. The ESLs continued fixation for Innovation is counterproductive to progress.

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The small profit made from the RLWC is unlikely to make a significant difference to any future planning at International level.The unpalatable truth is "organic" growth is the only sustainable way to plan ahead.

Can you plan 'organic' growth? Or does this just happen? There is doesn't seem to be any development strategy that I'm aware of in the UK, so any spreading of the game is just by chance as opposed to design.

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As long as you have a RLWC where the majority of the players come from 2 countries and play in one of 2 leagues, expansion will remains pipe dream. France needs it's own pro comp.......10 more top tier clubs fighting withe the existing 28 (from next year) with a standard cap across the world.....and limits on foreign players.

 

That's not strictly true. The majority of the English, Australian, New Zealand and French teams come from their respective countries.

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The optism of the world cup seems to be evaporating very quickly.However the lack of planning with fixtures is self inflicted.Surely it is not too difficult to have fixtures planned 3 or 4 years in advance.

The main consolation I take is compared to where we are 10 to 15 years ago and the number of countries having at least minimal activity.Again it all comes down to money and the commitment to spread the gospel.

 

I don't know what the funding levels are but the growth if international RL in Europe is nothing short of amazing and I would support funding of the RLEF based on that. China is a step too far, I think but Canada, Jamaica and, to a lesser extent, the USA could use a little help to further progress some excellent expansionary activity.

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And most of the money is created by the two professional leagues. But what's in it for them to spend that money on outsiders? Talent? Maybe. Does it pay off to go down that route? Probably not. 

 

No ghe money available for international expsnsiin was created by the orld Cup tournament and a lot of that was created by fixtures involving the lesser powers.

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Why? We're always saying we need more money in the game, so why not go where the money is? If I was someone like Koukash, I'd be taking a Salford pre-season match to Dubai and play against of the NRL teams. 

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Can you plan 'organic' growth? Or does this just happen? There is doesn't seem to be any development strategy that I'm aware of in the UK, so any spreading of the game is just by chance as opposed to design.

 

The "spreading" of the game would seem to be on the back of League being a version of "Rugby" that some prefer to take rather than the archaic and over-technical Union version. Countries are well aware of the game thanks to globalisation, and RL having a big presence in Australia, and so a minority of sportspeople in a number of countries choose to take it up, just like round here some people choose to take up Lacrosse and play for Leeds at the local Adel Sports club.

 

That somehow there's a country or countries that are going to embrace the game to the extent of threatening to end the domination of the Aussies (or even give England a game), if only we had a "development plan" and the small matter of a few £Million to fund it whilst the country takes to the game so completely it generates it's own funding is just a very nice fantasy, but it isn't going to happen.

 

The growth of any sport must be on the back of people wanting to actually play it, and we don't have to look any further than our own backyard to see whether people do, and to what extent. We love the game sure, and so we love to point out which school has just switched to League, which Midlands town now has a amateur club, or which country has formed a small national league. We aren't as good at taking as much notice when the same players, clubs and leagues disband or contract. 

 

As a big league fan do I really want to see a £Million being spent on the game in Serbia, or do I want that money being spent at home to bolster our own game and maybe build a little infrastructure where it would count and where we would see and benefit from the results? Marketing the game in far away places when it's in danger of contracting in our own back yard seems an odd thing to do, and so leaving the growth of the game in far away new places to "chance" is clearly all we can do.

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The "spreading" of the game would seem to be on the back of League being a version of "Rugby" that some prefer to take rather than the archaic and over-technical Union version. Countries are well aware of the game thanks to globalisation, and RL having a big presence in Australia, and so a minority of sportspeople in a number of countries choose to take it up, just like round here some people choose to take up Lacrosse and play for Leeds at the local Adel Sports club.

 

That somehow there's a country or countries that are going to embrace the game to the extent of threatening to end the domination of the Aussies (or even give England a game), if only we had a "development plan" and the small matter of a few £Million to fund it whilst the country takes to the game so completely it generates it's own funding is just a very nice fantasy, but it isn't going to happen.

 

The growth of any sport must be on the back of people wanting to actually play it, and we don't have to look any further than our own backyard to see whether people do, and to what extent. We love the game sure, and so we love to point out which school has just switched to League, which Midlands town now has a amateur club, or which country has formed a small national league. We aren't as good at taking as much notice when the same players, clubs and leagues disband or contract. 

 

As a big league fan do I really want to see a £Million being spent on the game in Serbia, or do I want that money being spent at home to bolster our own game and maybe build a little infrastructure where it would count and where we would see and benefit from the results? Marketing the game in far away places when it's in danger of contracting in our own back yard seems an odd thing to do, and so leaving the growth of the game in far away new places to "chance" is clearly all we can do.

 

Ideally we need to do both. Where there is a big SL club such as Leeds, then Leeds need to take up the mantle of development there to be fair, the rhinos are doing just that. This frees up money for development in other areas of the UK and for international agendas.

 

Whilst both of these areas are unlikely to produce either a SL team or an international colossus any time soon, both could. have and will produce players, some of whom will be good enough to supplement the current pro leagues players pool. This alone is sufficient reason to persevere with funding og both areas.

 

The last world cup showed the value of the lesser nations in that they played a significant part in the overall success of the tournament. I can see the likes of Serbia, Russia and Italy contributing and qualifying for future world cups adding value to the competition and maybe pulling in more TV viewers.

 

Seeing as how the money from the WC was generated by an international tournament, I think these profits should be ploughed back into that area of the game for the benefit of international expansion and north Leeds or all Leeds should be left to the Rhinos to finance.

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That's not strictly true. The majority of the English, Australian, New Zealand and French teams come from their respective countries.

PNG , Fiji and Wales too.

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The "spreading" of the game would seem to be on the back of League being a version of "Rugby" that some prefer to take rather than the archaic and over-technical Union version. Countries are well aware of the game thanks to globalisation, and RL having a big presence in Australia, and so a minority of sportspeople in a number of countries choose to take it up, just like round here some people choose to take up Lacrosse and play for Leeds at the local Adel Sports club.

.....

This is key.  Media used to be local and national.  Indeed, whatever sport a region was playing at the onset of mass media is almost certainly the sport it plays today. 

 

However, things are changing and media is less geographically based and as a result sport is less and less geographically based.  Forty years ago, the only team sports in Copenhagen were soccer, handball and a small amount of rugby union.  Now, there is soccer, handball, rugby league, american football, gaelic football, cricket, roller derby, korfball and a small amount of rugby union.   The same will be happening in Leeds, Wigan and St Helens.

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The International sporting landscape may be permanent now. NFL in America. Football in Brazil. Table tennis in China. Perhaps spending money to Introduce a foreign game is throwing money away. In the ESL Bradford and London are bleeding as are several others. Best to grow the game from a strong position than speculate the hard earned on some whimsical overseas experiment.

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The International sporting landscape may be permanent now. NFL in America. Football in Brazil. Table tennis in China. Perhaps spending money to Introduce a foreign game is throwing money away. In the ESL Bradford and London are bleeding as are several others. Best to grow the game from a strong position than speculate the hard earned on some whimsical overseas experiment.

How much money do you think is spent and will you ensure the other sports buy into your truce?

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Best to grow the game from a strong position than speculate the hard earned on some whimsical overseas experiment.

 

Which strong position is this?

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The International sporting landscape may be permanent now. NFL in America. Football in Brazil. Table tennis in China. Perhaps spending money to Introduce a foreign game is throwing money away. In the ESL Bradford and London are bleeding as are several others. Best to grow the game from a strong position than speculate the hard earned on some whimsical overseas experiment.

 

Tell that to football, which has done exactly that in new markets over the last 20-30 years. 

 

I agree that English money should not be spent on developing the game overseas. It should be down to the RLIF. 

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This is key.  Media used to be local and national.  Indeed, whatever sport a region was playing at the onset of mass media is almost certainly the sport it plays today. 

 

However, things are changing and media is less geographically based and as a result sport is less and less geographically based.  Forty years ago, the only team sports in Copenhagen were soccer, handball and a small amount of rugby union.  Now, there is soccer, handball, rugby league, american football, gaelic football, cricket, roller derby, korfball and a small amount of rugby union.   The same will be happening in Leeds, Wigan and St Helens.

Korfball's coming to town,

In your diary write it down,

Roll on October, hip hip hooray,

Joy in Leeuwarden for sure ... :tongue:

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Tell that to football, which has done exactly that in new markets over the last 20-30 years. 

 

I agree that English money should not be spent on developing the game overseas. It should be down to the RLIF. 

 

Exactly, football in Japan has exploded in the last 20 years or so, which is why the Premier League teams are going there for their pre-season tours to capitalize on the market. Basketball has grown huge in China in the last decade or so.

How do you grow the game in a new country without giving them something in return? That's why the NRL should take trial matches to Asia imo. We saw the Rabbitohs play Leeds in Jacksonville a few years ago, so why not something similar in Japan for example. 

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Ask yourself the question , why has International RL failed to happen? The game is a great spectator sport. The product is excellent .My belief is that its failure to expand is directly a result of bad management. How accountable are these managers? Not very. Look at Bradford. The game will wither and die if the status quo is allowed to continue.

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PNG , Fiji and Wales too.

That's not accurate in the case of Fiji.  13 of their 24 World Cup players were born in Australia and  4 of the Fijian-born players (Sisa Waqa, Akuila Uate, Aaron Groom and Petero Civoniceva) moved to Australia with their families as kids and came through the Aussie junior RL system.  The rest of the Fijian-born players all seem to have come from junior RU backgrounds.

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Ask yourself the question , why has International RL failed to happen? The game is a great spectator sport. The product is excellent .My belief is that its failure to expand is directly a result of bad management. How accountable are these managers? Not very. Look at Bradford. The game will wither and die if the status quo is allowed to continue.

 

The game has lots of influence and cultural importance in Australia, yet there are still no teams in Perth or Adelaide. Super League still doesn't have teams in many major cities. I don't think we can criticise nations when it comes to expansion as they can't rely on the base that exists in England and Australia.  

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Korfball's coming to town,

In your diary write it down,

Roll on October, hip hip hooray,

Joy in Leeuwarden for sure ... :tongue:

There are more korfball clubs in Scotland than rugby league clubs, and that with absolutely ###### all investment. Quite absurd on the face of it!

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Ask yourself the question , why has International RL failed to happen? The game is a great spectator sport. The product is excellent .My belief is that its failure to expand is directly a result of bad management. How accountable are these managers? Not very. Look at Bradford. The game will wither and die if the status quo is allowed to continue.

 

I would say one reason being the powers that be want to keep it that way and number two, laziness. Why would Australia, for example, want the game to take off in say Spain and have the best domestic championship and national team from Spain? I know the RFL get a lot of criticism regarding expansion, but over the last 15 years, we've had SL teams from France, Wales and Gateshead, as well as semi pro teams in South Wales, North Wales, Oxford, Hemel, Haringey and Gloucestershire. In comparison, what have the French federation done to get more clubs from central and north France in the game? What have NZ done to develop the game more around the country? Why do countries like Scotland and Ireland still have so few teams? etc. 

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