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davidhubball

Why shout SET before running forwards/backwards in a line

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Hi

I know this isn't a coaching forum but I quite urgently need some answers before I help train some kids tonight please.

What is the purpose of shouting SET in a line-out before shouting IN. What does SET mean? Does it mean get in a line? What if they the players are already in a line - why shout is then? Does it mean "get ready" to run forward? Does it mean 'SET' yourself on an attacker to mark?

 

Also someone mentioned to me that SET and BACK should be shouted before players run backwards after a tackle has been made, in order to run back in a straight line. Why is running back in a straight line so important or is it more about spacing yourselves out better when running backwards or both?

Please help.

Kind Regards

David

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http://www.rugbyleaguelearning.org/

 

http://www.rugbyleaguelearning.org/coaching-tips-guides/

 

http://www.rugbyleaguelearning.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Level-2-drills.pdf

 

 

Alternatively speak to this fella..................

 

Jon Roberts - RFL Director of Performance and Coaching

 

E-mail: Jon.Roberts@rfl.uk.com

 

I'm sure he could help point you in the right direction   :D

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Thanks Lord very much - Excellent links which I will reference and aborb. Cheers.

 

So shouting SET alerts players that they are about to use up 1 of their 6 Set. Would that be an accurate way of stating why players shout SET?

 

Cheers

matt

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Shouting SET normally indicates that the defensive line is set to move up when the ball is played.(that's the case in my son's team)

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So presumably, if the Defensive Line isn't ready then SET should not be shouted? and skip straight to the IN command?

 

I'm just a bit confused - if just one player shouts SET, the rest don't, then who should shout IN?

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I always just saw it as a communication thing - getting back as a unit for the 'set' call to show you are all ready. If a lazy player is not making the line this will be highlighted. 

We always used it as a disciplined way of keeping the line together and 'set'.

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Hi Dave

That sounds enough for me to know I think, thank you. Can you recommend other ways to motivate the players to get back to the line quicker for age 10 kids? I could make the slow ones do a press-up but maybe that too harsh I'm not sure.

Cheers

Dave

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Hi Dave

That sounds enough for me to know I think, thank you. Can you recommend other ways to motivate the players to get back to the line quicker for age 10 kids? I could make the slow ones do a press-up but maybe that too harsh I'm not sure.

Cheers

Dave

Lol, yeah that does sound slightly harsh, I just think positive re-enforcement and educating players why it is important - maybe call 'freeze' to highlight defensive gaps during a game. I suppose it depends how advanced your kids are, but tbh I would just re-enforce what others have said on these threads, work on the core skills, keep it relatively simple and importantly enjoyable, they are kids, not SL players. 

 

If they enjoy it, they will soon learn to be back in the defensive line as they wont want to concede tries in a game.

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And there lies the problem with many junior coaches,they think they are coaching SL players,not kids.

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Could the problem be that the Level 2 coaching course is geared towards adults as opposed to making it fun.

 

Interestingly, the coach has just completed his course. While doing the course and after it, he gave the U10s some really baby level drills to do like picking the ball off the floor. I don't know for sure but I'm sure the coach learned these on the level 2 coarse. My kid was physically in tears after one of the sessions out of boredom and frustration with something that he loves doing. I then found out some of the other kids also felt the same. Icomplained directly to the coach and so far things have improved slightly - just slightly.

 

Fingers crossed things will get better!!

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Could the problem be that the Level 2 coaching course is geared towards adults as opposed to making it fun.

 

Interestingly, the coach has just completed his course. While doing the course and after it, he gave the U10s some really baby level drills to do like picking the ball off the floor. I don't know for sure but I'm sure the coach learned these on the level 2 coarse. My kid was physically in tears after one of the sessions out of boredom and frustration with something that he loves doing. I then found out some of the other kids also felt the same. Icomplained directly to the coach and so far things have improved slightly - just slightly.

 

Fingers crossed things will get better!!

At the courses I attended there was a major focus on the core skills, but there was also the message about keeping things fun with plenty of variety.

 

Rugby League is varied enough that even if you are doing 3 or 4 core skill drills it can be fun and varied enough to retain interest. Throwing in some competitive games always helps, things like British Bulldog, or relay races with a RL ball etc.

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I'm all for bulldog or relays as this involves more than 2 players at the same time.

 

One drill went like this. Put the kids into to seperate queues. Give one rugby ball to each person at the front of the queue. Get the players to walk up to each other and take in turns twice to knock the back out of each others hands using the ball.

If you knock the ball out of there hands then you score 1 point. This went on for about 30 minutes. That would bore anyone to tears. Goodness knows where this game came from - lol.

 

Dave  ;)

 

Given your inexperience as an unqualified coach who is struggling to understand the basic fundamentals of coaching practice relative to defensive principles, you seem eager to criticise and belittle a coach who has made the effort to become qualified and also volunteer his time in an effort to improve the 10 year old children you make reference to.

 

You also make reference to what you feel are pointless drills and objectives within the coaching sessions that are delivered, I am however unsure what qualifies you to make such a judgement as you openly admit you are apparently only a concerned "Parent".

 

Just an observation or two for you to reflect upon  :)

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Dave  ;)

 

Given your inexperience as an unqualified coach who is struggling to understand the basic fundamentals of coaching practice relative to defensive principles, you seem eager to criticise and belittle a coach who has made the effort to become qualified and also volunteer his time in an effort to improve the 10 year old children you make reference to.

 

You also make reference to what you feel are pointless drills and objectives within the coaching sessions that are delivered, I am however unsure what qualifies you to make such a judgement as you openly admit you are apparently only a concerned "Parent".

 

Just an observation or two for you to reflect upon  :)

Actually, I would support this, although this is not aimed at the above poster, as I'm sure your post wasn't personal.

 

Too many parents feel they can do much better than qualified coaches, but then at the same time, there are many coaches that are shoddy so do deserve challenging. This should always be done in a proactive way, in the form of a discussion well away from kids and not by parents who feel it is acceptable to shout from the sidelines because they happen to watch SL on a Friday night.

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Lord

Thank you for you observation, raising the point and allowing me to justify myself in light of this situation.

 

As far as I see it, if you volunteer to be a coach children then first of all you should be good with kids, see fun as a priority, be willing to give 100% commitment to that and start with some basic knowledge. The only area where the current coach has passed is in his basic knowledge progressing to a Level 2 qualification. There are still mayor issues with these 3 areas: good with kids, see fun as a priority, be willing to give 100% commitment to the afore mentioned. Failure in these 3 areas means that no matter how much knowledge and experience you have, you are going to destory the team sooner or later.

 

** So who or what is that a failure of? The Coach, The Club or The Coaching Education System? **

 

As far as me having a right to judge someone more qualified than me, I see it like this:-

I offer my help and help the coach in every single training session (despite being ignored and shunned on the odd occasion).

I attend every single training session to be on hand and step in if needed.

I have offered to be a coach but been fobbed off twice so far.

I step in and coach whenever the coach isn't there.

I am also a Touch Line Manager so already at every match again on hand.

 

So I believe that I ave right to notice and state when things are not up to a certain standard.

 

If you knew of a teacher who wasn't up to standard with maybe your own child, would you just lay down and say nothing or would you try to seek advice do something about it ? In this case, the teacher will be more qualified than you in many areas but you let that stop you in deciding how your child is taught?

 

** Teachers are paid professionals, not qualified unpaid volunteers **

 

I have a point and so do you. Nobody is right - we can only go by what we think is best which is how I try to live.

 

Cheers for now

Dave

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I'm well aware whose fault it its. II would say its the Clubs and Coaches fault because :-

a) The clubs fault for not realising the coach is not very good with kids

B) The coaches fault for not realising that kids need to have fun and be treat like SL players

c) The coaches fault for not having the intuition to realise that some drills will not work with age 10 year old in advance of a training session.

 

In my view, education should never stop even after a qualification has been achived - trust me, now that hes got qualified, the learning will stop on his part. At least I'm trying to learn with the little resourses I've been given.

 

So given he is a newly qualified coach what were you expecting from him?

 

The club are at fault because in your opinion he is not very good with kids?

 

Is it that he perhaps does not explain himself clearly because he is still learning himself, or that he is over thinking everything and in his efforts to improve the kids is progressing them beyond their existing skillset?

 

Do the club have a head coach, coaching director etc who monitors and assists in the progress and development of the coaches? Could assistance be forthcoming from that area, ie more experienced coaches?

 

Why will the learning stop?

 

Or will it stop due to a lack of support and resources?

 

You yourself have experienced difficulty in accessing information to assist you in attempting to understand how best to educate and develop the kids have you not?

 

Is that not down to a lack of available resource? Is this the fault of the RFL and its coach education department?

 

Lots to consider, don't you agree?

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I will answer Lord in a short while.

 

To Kevin

What are you saying - I'm not sure what you mean? so I don't misinterpet what you said.

Cheers

David

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Am I the only one who doesnt think these threads by davidhubball aren't genuine?

Seems an odd use of someone's time if they're not.

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To be honest, the using the ball to twonk the ball out of the other guys hand sounds like good craic. Admittedly 30 minutes could get boring. 

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To be honest, the using the ball to twonk the ball out of the other guys hand sounds like good craic. Admittedly 30 minutes could get boring. 

 

Its a game developed to place emphasis on correct grip and is usually enjoyed by most.

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