Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

davidhubball

Why shout SET before running forwards/backwards in a line

102 posts in this topic

i've been thinking about this. surely some drilling is beneficial? like how to tackle properly, how to take a high ball, even how to pick the ball up properly. maybe as a warm up?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing wrong with drilling at all - just not exclusive, isolated drilling.  Level one tackling lessons start with protective falling, to the front, both sides and back then with tackling drills from the front and from both sides before putting it into games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To Latch, regarding protective falling, I presume you mean fully padded up and/or with a soft-mat to fall on to practice tackling. My son's club (age 10s) has never provided any protection like this and another reason why I am currently looking elsewhere.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why would you have full padding for protected falling? Totally defeats the object....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well if you'll only accept answers from expert child coaches with proven track records you're likely asking in the wrong place. The kids are falling on to grass, aren't they?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well if you've never trained kids with and without padding how would you know if padding is a good idea or not. Stop acting like you know when your not an expert. Are you saying that there are no expert child coaches in these forums? of course not.

 

If you've ever trained in other high contact sports like Taekwondo, Karate, Judo, Jui-Jitsu etc, they all start with padding/thick mats. Theres no shame in that. Before long, after building up some confidence they reduce the padding, use thinner mats or even no mats etc...

If you trained say Jui-Jitsu to anyone on concrete floors with no padding (like in a real fight), many of the potential black belts would quit within a couple of sessions and would be put off for life.

Theres no shame is using padding at first - it makes it more fun for the kids.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well if you've never trained kids with and without padding how would you know if padding is a good idea or not. Stop acting like you know when your not an expert. Are you saying that there are no expert child coaches in these forums? of course not.

 

If you've ever trained in other high contact sports like Taekwondo, Karate, Judo, Jui-Jitsu etc, they all start with padding/thick mats. Theres no shame in that. Before long, after building up some confidence they reduce the padding, use thinner mats or even no mats etc...

If you trained say Jui-Jitsu to anyone on concrete floors with no padding (like in a real fight), many of the potential black belts would quit within a couple of sessions and would be put off for life.

Theres no shame is using padding at first - it makes it more fun for the kids.

No padding,learning to fall safely.That's all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There may well be expert children's coaches on here. But maybe they don't want to prove their track record to a stranger on the Internet. Incidentally, have you ever seen or taken part in one of those drills? It was some time ago for me, but iirc they literally involve falling over onto the grass making sure you don't put all your weight onto your outstretched arm. I'm sure someone else can explain better. But it certainly isn't high impact. Even the tackling drills aren't at first. But fair enough - if your kid is being taught these drills on concrete time to find another club. Is that the case?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HI

No the kids aren't being taught on concrete (skill hard ground nevertheless) but the kids are definitely not taught how to fall so I'm glad you raised that point, thanks. My kid is quite fortunate as he does Judo which I think is how hes managed to avoid as many injuries as some of the other kids. I think if padding had been used initially and removed in a gradual fashion then many more of the kids would have gained more confidence in tackling by now.

Cheer for the kudos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well if you've never trained kids with and without padding how would you know if padding is a good idea or not. Stop acting like you know when your not an expert. Are you saying that there are no expert child coaches in these forums? of course

Theres no shame is using padding at first - it makes it more fun for the kids.

You know I'm not an 'expert child coach' do you? Good luck with that argument fella

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To Latch, regarding protective falling, I presume you mean fully padded up and/or with a soft-mat to fall on to practice tackling. My son's club (age 10s) has never provided any protection like this and another reason why I am currently looking elsewhere.

Cheers

You can't wrap kids up on bubble wrap. Kids need to be kids.

The risk of injury during protective falling exercises is incredibly low if done on grass. At the end of the day, that's where they'll be falling so they need to get used to it. I'm not quote sure what area they'd benefit from being padded in here to be honest?

Well if you've never trained kids with and without padding how would you know if padding is a good idea or not. Stop acting like you know when your not an expert. Are you saying that there are no expert child coaches in these forums? of course not.

If you want to get advice on these forums, there's a certain etiquette. Having a go at anyone and everyone isn't one of them.

Personal judgement and experience is enough to tell you you don't need to do something without actually trying and failing. I know without trying that it's not a good idea to give children knives in class for example!

One thing you'll need to learn to do, if you want to be a coach, is accept feedback without taking it personally. Some ideas are good. Some aren't. You don't need to be a qualified expert with a doctorate to be able to give feedback. Listen to their argument, and if it's justified, take their advice.

Oh, and lastly, anyone can say they're anything on the internet.

If you've ever trained in other high contact sports like Taekwondo, Karate, Judo, Jui-Jitsu etc, they all start with padding/thick mats. Theres no shame in that. Before long, after building up some confidence they reduce the padding, use thinner mats or even no mats etc...

If you trained say Jui-Jitsu to anyone on concrete floors with no padding (like in a real fight), many of the potential black belts would quit within a couple of sessions and would be put off for life.

Theres no shame is using padding at first - it makes it more fun for the kids.

You're talking about combat sports here, where the children are meant to hit each other. They actually compete on padding as well IIRC. There are certain risks about training on concrete, and that's where you risk assess.

In relation to your point about using padding though, clubs don't have a lot of resources to spend on things where there is low risk and deemed unnecessary. Plus, it takes more time to set up. You've only got so much time to spend and you don't want to do it sorting out equipment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've been thinking about this. surely some drilling is beneficial? like how to tackle properly, how to take a high ball, even how to pick the ball up properly. maybe as a warm up?

Oh absolutely. But not exclusively. Very minimal drilling so children can understand the technical aspect of a skill. You then put it into challenges and game-based activities where they are rewarded for using that skill.

I usually build my sessions around the three Cs - Coach, Control, Compete.

As for the warm up, if you drill kids in a warm up, they'll switch off before they've started. There are lots of opinions on warm ups, and academically these are changing all the time to the point where many see little difference (injury wise) in children warming up. The biggest part of the warm up for me is switching your head on, and you'll only do that in game-related activities IMO.

Oh, and for any prospective coaches out there, DO NOT do static stretches as part of a warm up (hold a muscle in position, e.g. bending to touch your toes and holding there). It's pointless unless you're trying to increase flexibility. Cool down, yes (those stretches help to reduce lactic acid).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And their use and application when learning how to FALL would be what exactly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its not just when falling you can get injured - its the point of impact the injuries can also occur.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that those things have their uses in honing technique (ring) and when you are doing a lot of impact work (suit). However, you have to get used to taking a knock - and early. Otherwise when kids take the pitch in competition, they might get scared - and that is when accidents happen. Also, tackle bags can instill a false confidence leading to recklessness. As my old coach said - they don't hit back!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its not just when falling you can get injured - its the point of impact the injuries can also occur.

So should they be worn in a game too?If anything the impacts are harder in a game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So should they be worn in a game too?If anything the impacts are harder in a game.

It would look more like It's A Knockout than Rugby League. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If my child is say 10 years old and hes quite new to rugby about to play in his first match......

Going up against a hardened team who have been playing since about age 5 is not really something I would like to try myself let alone ask a 10 year old kid.

Using padding doesn't sound like a bad idea - the use it in American Football, Taekqwondo, Karate competitions. Its not as daft idea as you think. It would be interesting to raise a team from age 5 using padding, gradually removing the padding as they approach age 6 and 7 and see how much more confiident and better tacklers they become compared to kids that start off with no padding. I wouldn't say this approach is the same as wrapping them in cotton wool would you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my youngest is 6 and as been playing for about 5 months. he wears his head guard and shoulder pads and that is enough. the knocks and bumps he gets now will toughen him up. 

 

the tackle suits would only limit movement in my opinion. these kids need to get used to been knocked around if they wanna play this game. 

 

i think all junior players should be made to worn hear guards though. it used to be compulsory to wear head guards upto a certain age but they had to stop this as it was against the players human rights to force them to wear them. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So if you remove the padding as you progress through the age groups,you lessen the risk of injuries?Am I right?Surely the force of impact will increase as players get older?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The idea for me is that the players can get used to falling safely using correct technique and gradually get used to th knocks/hits then remove the padding away as the tackling techniques are correct. My money would be on the team that wears all the padding in the initial stages to have more confidence in their tackles and beat a similar kind of team that started with no padding at all.

 

As you get older, the kids will be heavier and more prone to heavier tackles but you will know that they have the techniques correct to keep injuries to a mimumum.

 

In my kids team, there are always a couple of kids that have picked up wrist, leg or ankle injuries that halt/slow down their learning and knocks their confident in tackles that I'm sure could have been avoided if padding had been used initially.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



League Express - Mon 24th July 2017

Rugby League World - August 2017