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Kenilworth Tiger

Buying teachers presents at the end of term

25 posts in this topic

DIscuss

 

BTW - I'm totally against it and my wife thinks I'm miserable for thinking so!

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I'm with you. And when I went to school doing something like that would have been a very quick way to get yourself beaten up.

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At our boys school the parents all put into a collection if they want to which is then used to buy one or two things for each teacher/teaching assistant in the class.  I suppose it all depends on the kids and the staff but I've not had a year where I haven't thought that an extra thank you wasn't appropriate for them.

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I'm in no doubt some kids leave lovely presents for the teachers. All over their cars or in their desk.

 

Sometimes I used to wonder if Sir or Miss making it through the year was a gift in itself.

 

That said, I'd love to see lil Kenny offering Miss Honey a bottle of gin after class... covered in shaving foam.

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My wife is a teacher and she tells the children not to buy presents but as normal she gets innundated with chocolates and the odd bottle of wine . Whether this is down to the children or their parents nobody knows , I suspect it's the parents when it comes to the wine.  At least the grandchildren get extra chocolate  Christmas, Easter & end of term.

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Like many things it is relatively new but once someone cottoned onto it, Asda etc started filling their shelves with 'gifts for teacher' and now its got its own life.

I wouldn't mind but its not like they actually do any work is it? ;)

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I used to cop for a bottle of beer or two and some old spice which was very thoughtful

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Like many things it is relatively new but once someone cottoned onto it, Asda etc started filling their shelves with 'gifts for teacher' and now its got its own life.

I wouldn't mind but its not like they actually do any work is it? ;)

I'm not sure about it being a 'relatively new' occurrence. My Mum was a teacher (she is now 70) and she received gifts all the way through her teaching career, ie the whole of her working life.

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I'm not sure about it being a 'relatively new' occurrence. My Mum was a teacher (she is now 70) and she received gifts all the way through her teaching career, ie the whole of her working life.

Me too until I started teaching in the criminal justice system and then thinks kinda changed

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It wasn't a feature of my school years.

 

However, we used to buy a bottle of something for the postman and th UPS driver every Christmas at work.

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Not something I ever did but I have a few friends who are teachers and they all appreciate the thought. I've been given gifts in the past from students and I feel uncomfortable about it because I'm also the one marking their work.

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Its new to me, I don't recall it being the done thing when I was at school.

 

That said I have a little lad in pre-school and we bought his key worker/teacher a bunch of flowers because she goes above and beyond with him and we really do appreciate what she does.

 

My daughters in reception at primary school and again, has a very good relationship with her teachers, so we will be sending her in with a little bit of something tomorrow on the last day of term.  If I felt obliged to I wouldn't bother, but her teachers have been great helping her through her first year in school and she loves it so it just feels like the right thing to do.

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Having a son who has just left school ,most of the time the "gift for teacher" is actually a competition amongst parents as to who can buy the most expensive gift.Total waste of time.

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Having a son who has just left school ,most of the time the "gift for teacher" is actually a competition amongst parents as to who can buy the most expensive gift.Total waste of time.

In my day it was clearly the work of the children, but you would get cards and letters from parents.

You felt that you were being genuinely appreciated.

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In my day it was clearly the work of the children, but you would get cards and letters from parents.

You felt that you were being genuinely appreciated.

Not anymore,as the shelves in stores and online show,it's now a competition.

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Not anymore,as the shelves in stores and online show,it's now a competition.

it misses the point entirely

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it misses the point entirely

Indeed it does.A simple thank you card should suffice,preferably home made.

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Just get your son/daughter to give them a home made card with "Thanks for being a great teacher, enjoy your 6/7 weeks holiday".

That should do the trick.

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I'm not sure about it being a 'relatively new' occurrence. My Mum was a teacher (she is now 70) and she received gifts all the way through her teaching career, ie the whole of her working life.

I've no doubt that some people gave teachers a gift since forever but displays in Tescos etc? That's definitely recent

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Mate of mine (who later became head boy)broke into school and crapped in the science teachers desk as an end of term thank you for failing him in the chemistry test.

Many moons later he became a teacher himself.

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I used to cop for a bottle of beer or two and some old spice which was very thoughtful

 

splash it on, did you?  

 

 

 

 

but what did you do with the old spice?   :)  :)

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Just get your son/daughter to give them a home made card with "Thanks for being a great teacher, enjoy your 6/7 weeks holiday".

That should do the trick.

 

 

Good. I like that.  Could also send a card reminding them of their monthly gift from the taxpayer..that should do it!

 

But serious, though, it really is not just a nonsense, but just plain wrong to buy a gift competitively.  I agree with post #15

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splash it on, did you?  

 

 

 

 

but what did you do with the old spice?   :)  :)

made a cocktail of it with Brut, denim  and Hai Karate: unstoppable

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As a teacher currently, I receive quite a large number of presents from the kids/parents.

 

I have mixed feelings about it. Some kids really seem to enjoy giving and it can be a nice personal touch, akin to giving the postman a tip at Christmas etc so in theory I have nothing against it and although often a bit awkward I don't feel guilty about receiving them.

 

In reality I end up with way more beer, chocolates and 'best teacher' keyrings than I have any need or use for. I prefer it when children make something, even something small like a pot of jam or something. It is also correct that sadly it is becoming more prevalent IMO. In a school I was in previously, maybe 90% of children would bring something whereas in my current school it is probably 50%. However, even in my current school this is increasing and it is due to parents feeling that because one parent is doing it, that they should do it too. The more this happens, the more parents feel that they should. There was a funny piece from Dave Gorman on Easter cards and how once one person gives one before you know it everybody is giving one out of obligation.

 

The sad result is often that it ends up making some children feel bad and possibly even ridiculed for not bringing anything.

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