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PurstonJavelin

The last rugby league game I ever watch

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The last game of rugby league I ever watch.

Hull vs Leeds, April 2018

I used to thrill over tight defences broken by astute passes, breathtaking footwork, evasion and deception, perfectly executed leg tackles, the balance between attacking calculation and reactive defence. Not any more. Now the game is about wrestling, pushing, battering, impact, playing the referee, winning penalties, the important and game changing action mostly taking place on the floor. Standing up quickly after being tackled is now the most valuable skill in the game. The whole affair is accompanied by ridiculous hyperbole from the commentators, and the incessant nattering of a referee needing to manipulate the rules and attempting to choreograph the game to a preconceived pattern and pace. A referee so incapable of keeping a defence onside, he has to sprint forward at each play the ball to avoid giving a penalty. The game had two good passes - the lead commentator did not appear to have the wit to appreciate them - not enough for 80 minutes of involvement.

The game is no longer the greatest game, the most thrilling spectacle in sport. Super League, the most visible part of the sport, has become a tedious, uncomfortable, sometimes ugly, activity. The drama of a close score (that it seems suspiciously orchestrated is my own delusion), occasionally adds a last few minutes of interest to otherwise drabness.

What I used to enjoy is not coming back. Most other spectators want it as it is, and the top teams have an enormous vested interest in the status quo. And there’s no point in hanging about for the possible expansion, exciting though the prospect is: it will falter and fail because the sport is simply not as watchable as some think, not enough to capture the spending and attention and commitment of people who have an array of alternatives.

None of what this silly old dinosaur thinks matters: the game is better off without me. No big drama, but after a lifetime’s involvement, I think I’ll have a final word. Except I won’t be the last one to give up: there is a significant percentage of fans who are becoming increasingly disillusioned.  And I do need replacing. So can someone find a six year old to introduce to the sport, a new fan who will watch, play, teach, preach, coach and spectate for the next 50 years?

Bye. For good.

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3 minutes ago, PurstonJavelin said:

The last game of rugby league I ever watch.

Hull vs Leeds, April 2018

I used to thrill over tight defences broken by astute passes, breathtaking footwork, evasion and deception, perfectly executed leg tackles, the balance between attacking calculation and reactive defence. Not any more. Now the game is about wrestling, pushing, battering, impact, playing the referee, winning penalties, the important and game changing action mostly taking place on the floor. Standing up quickly after being tackled is now the most valuable skill in the game. The whole affair is accompanied by ridiculous hyperbole from the commentators, and the incessant nattering of a referee needing to manipulate the rules and attempting to choreograph the game to a preconceived pattern and pace. A referee so incapable of keeping a defence onside, he has to sprint forward at each play the ball to avoid giving a penalty. The game had two good passes - the lead commentator did not appear to have the wit to appreciate them - not enough for 80 minutes of involvement.

The game is no longer the greatest game, the most thrilling spectacle in sport. Super League, the most visible part of the sport, has become a tedious, uncomfortable, sometimes ugly, activity. The drama of a close score (that it seems suspiciously orchestrated is my own delusion), occasionally adds a last few minutes of interest to otherwise drabness.

What I used to enjoy is not coming back. Most other spectators want it as it is, and the top teams have an enormous vested interest in the status quo. And there’s no point in hanging about for the possible expansion, exciting though the prospect is: it will falter and fail because the sport is simply not as watchable as some think, not enough to capture the spending and attention and commitment of people who have an array of alternatives.

None of what this silly old dinosaur thinks matters: the game is better off without me. No big drama, but after a lifetime’s involvement, I think I’ll have a final word. Except I won’t be the last one to give up: there is a significant percentage of fans who are becoming increasingly disillusioned.  And I do need replacing. So can someone find a six year old to introduce to the sport, a new fan who will watch, play, teach, preach, coach and spectate for the next 50 years?

Bye. For good.

Adieu

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32 minutes ago, PurstonJavelin said:

The last game of rugby league I ever watch.

Hull vs Leeds, April 2018

I used to thrill over tight defences broken by astute passes, breathtaking footwork, evasion and deception, perfectly executed leg tackles, the balance between attacking calculation and reactive defence. Not any more. Now the game is about wrestling, pushing, battering, impact, playing the referee, winning penalties, the important and game changing action mostly taking place on the floor. Standing up quickly after being tackled is now the most valuable skill in the game. The whole affair is accompanied by ridiculous hyperbole from the commentators, and the incessant nattering of a referee needing to manipulate the rules and attempting to choreograph the game to a preconceived pattern and pace. A referee so incapable of keeping a defence onside, he has to sprint forward at each play the ball to avoid giving a penalty. The game had two good passes - the lead commentator did not appear to have the wit to appreciate them - not enough for 80 minutes of involvement.

The game is no longer the greatest game, the most thrilling spectacle in sport. Super League, the most visible part of the sport, has become a tedious, uncomfortable, sometimes ugly, activity. The drama of a close score (that it seems suspiciously orchestrated is my own delusion), occasionally adds a last few minutes of interest to otherwise drabness.

What I used to enjoy is not coming back. Most other spectators want it as it is, and the top teams have an enormous vested interest in the status quo. And there’s no point in hanging about for the possible expansion, exciting though the prospect is: it will falter and fail because the sport is simply not as watchable as some think, not enough to capture the spending and attention and commitment of people who have an array of alternatives.

None of what this silly old dinosaur thinks matters: the game is better off without me. No big drama, but after a lifetime’s involvement, I think I’ll have a final word. Except I won’t be the last one to give up: there is a significant percentage of fans who are becoming increasingly disillusioned.  And I do need replacing. So can someone find a six year old to introduce to the sport, a new fan who will watch, play, teach, preach, coach and spectate for the next 50 years?

Bye. For good.

Are you from Yorkshire? 😀😀😀😀

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1 hour ago, PurstonJavelin said:

The last game of rugby league I ever watch.

Hull vs Leeds, April 2018

I used to thrill over tight defences broken by astute passes, breathtaking footwork, evasion and deception, perfectly executed leg tackles, the balance between attacking calculation and reactive defence. Not any more. Now the game is about wrestling, pushing, battering, impact, playing the referee, winning penalties, the important and game changing action mostly taking place on the floor. Standing up quickly after being tackled is now the most valuable skill in the game. The whole affair is accompanied by ridiculous hyperbole from the commentators, and the incessant nattering of a referee needing to manipulate the rules and attempting to choreograph the game to a preconceived pattern and pace. A referee so incapable of keeping a defence onside, he has to sprint forward at each play the ball to avoid giving a penalty. The game had two good passes - the lead commentator did not appear to have the wit to appreciate them - not enough for 80 minutes of involvement.

The game is no longer the greatest game, the most thrilling spectacle in sport. Super League, the most visible part of the sport, has become a tedious, uncomfortable, sometimes ugly, activity. The drama of a close score (that it seems suspiciously orchestrated is my own delusion), occasionally adds a last few minutes of interest to otherwise drabness.

What I used to enjoy is not coming back. Most other spectators want it as it is, and the top teams have an enormous vested interest in the status quo. And there’s no point in hanging about for the possible expansion, exciting though the prospect is: it will falter and fail because the sport is simply not as watchable as some think, not enough to capture the spending and attention and commitment of people who have an array of alternatives.

None of what this silly old dinosaur thinks matters: the game is better off without me. No big drama, but after a lifetime’s involvement, I think I’ll have a final word. Except I won’t be the last one to give up: there is a significant percentage of fans who are becoming increasingly disillusioned.  And I do need replacing. So can someone find a six year old to introduce to the sport, a new fan who will watch, play, teach, preach, coach and spectate for the next 50 years?

Bye. For good.

Totally agree - I turned off the wigan v Leeds game last week, probably the first time I've turned a game off in about 20 years.

i felt the same last night in a game including my own team - I won't be gone but I'm losing the enjoyment

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12 minutes ago, Kenilworth Tiger said:

Totally agree - I turned off the wigan v Leeds game last week, probably the first time I've turned a game off in about 20 years.

i felt the same last night in a game including my own team - I won't be gone but I'm losing the enjoyment

I wouldn’t disagree with this or the sentiments in the OP. 

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I somewhat share your sentinment. This is the first time in my 20 something years that I’ve preferred the offerings of the football season that the rugby league one - which is sad.

The game is becoming more of an arm wrestle than a game of true rugby skill.

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There's none of these issues with the ruck in the NRL though. There's also none of it in the amateur game. Don't let the fact that Super League has exceptionally weak referees put you off the game, even if it does put you off Super League. 

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The game lost a number of referees from the top pool such as Silverwood

The refs now are very inexperienced as a whole and only seem to have a black n white way of reffing rather than managing the game and its players which all comes through experience. They are also influenced to a greater extent by the gamesmanship of coaches and players

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3 hours ago, PurstonJavelin said:

The last game of rugby league I ever watch.

Hull vs Leeds, April 2018

I used to thrill over tight defences broken by astute passes, breathtaking footwork, evasion and deception, perfectly executed leg tackles, the balance between attacking calculation and reactive defence. Not any more. Now the game is about wrestling, pushing, battering, impact, playing the referee, winning penalties, the important and game changing action mostly taking place on the floor. Standing up quickly after being tackled is now the most valuable skill in the game. The whole affair is accompanied by ridiculous hyperbole from the commentators, and the incessant nattering of a referee needing to manipulate the rules and attempting to choreograph the game to a preconceived pattern and pace. A referee so incapable of keeping a defence onside, he has to sprint forward at each play the ball to avoid giving a penalty. The game had two good passes - the lead commentator did not appear to have the wit to appreciate them - not enough for 80 minutes of involvement.

The game is no longer the greatest game, the most thrilling spectacle in sport. Super League, the most visible part of the sport, has become a tedious, uncomfortable, sometimes ugly, activity. The drama of a close score (that it seems suspiciously orchestrated is my own delusion), occasionally adds a last few minutes of interest to otherwise drabness.

What I used to enjoy is not coming back. Most other spectators want it as it is, and the top teams have an enormous vested interest in the status quo. And there’s no point in hanging about for the possible expansion, exciting though the prospect is: it will falter and fail because the sport is simply not as watchable as some think, not enough to capture the spending and attention and commitment of people who have an array of alternatives.

None of what this silly old dinosaur thinks matters: the game is better off without me. No big drama, but after a lifetime’s involvement, I think I’ll have a final word. Except I won’t be the last one to give up: there is a significant percentage of fans who are becoming increasingly disillusioned.  And I do need replacing. So can someone find a six year old to introduce to the sport, a new fan who will watch, play, teach, preach, coach and spectate for the next 50 years?

Bye. For good.

http://maxdecimus13.blogspot.dk/2012/

This blog is now six years old and still topical.

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I am from Yorkshire and have watched ,played and supported R.L. since I was 8 years old. I am now 75 and after the start of this season decided not to watch S.L. again after the first couple of games.Weak,inconsistent refereeing by incompetent refs, downright cheating at basically every play the ball,feigning injury.The game has gone soft,ruined by coaches who obviously coach their teams to cheat.I still keep in contact with the game via The R.L Forum and apparently in last nights game half of the Wigan team surrounded the ref trying to make him change his decision.Did anybody get sent off from this?and this from a coach who says he will drop anybody from his team if they cheat.As the first poster this game used to be the greatest game,now it has become a joke,and is taking over from the wrestling of yesteryear.What will the R.L. do? Nothing,the game is going to the dogs.I shall carry on watching amateur rugby or lower league until they start copying the so called Super League and then that is me done with the game.

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4 hours ago, PurstonJavelin said:

The last game of rugby league I ever watch.

Hull vs Leeds, April 2018

I used to thrill over tight defences broken by astute passes, breathtaking footwork, evasion and deception, perfectly executed leg tackles, the balance between attacking calculation and reactive defence. Not any more. Now the game is about wrestling, pushing, battering, impact, playing the referee, winning penalties, the important and game changing action mostly taking place on the floor. Standing up quickly after being tackled is now the most valuable skill in the game. The whole affair is accompanied by ridiculous hyperbole from the commentators, and the incessant nattering of a referee needing to manipulate the rules and attempting to choreograph the game to a preconceived pattern and pace. A referee so incapable of keeping a defence onside, he has to sprint forward at each play the ball to avoid giving a penalty. The game had two good passes - the lead commentator did not appear to have the wit to appreciate them - not enough for 80 minutes of involvement.

The game is no longer the greatest game, the most thrilling spectacle in sport. Super League, the most visible part of the sport, has become a tedious, uncomfortable, sometimes ugly, activity. The drama of a close score (that it seems suspiciously orchestrated is my own delusion), occasionally adds a last few minutes of interest to otherwise drabness.

What I used to enjoy is not coming back. Most other spectators want it as it is, and the top teams have an enormous vested interest in the status quo. And there’s no point in hanging about for the possible expansion, exciting though the prospect is: it will falter and fail because the sport is simply not as watchable as some think, not enough to capture the spending and attention and commitment of people who have an array of alternatives.

None of what this silly old dinosaur thinks matters: the game is better off without me. No big drama, but after a lifetime’s involvement, I think I’ll have a final word. Except I won’t be the last one to give up: there is a significant percentage of fans who are becoming increasingly disillusioned.  And I do need replacing. So can someone find a six year old to introduce to the sport, a new fan who will watch, play, teach, preach, coach and spectate for the next 50 years?

Bye. For good.

Got to agree with yer sadly. I've been watching some old games from the 80s lately and some of the flair and speed of play on show puts some of today's games to shame for me.  Have we focused on defense too much over the last 20 odd years perhaps ? Where are the ball playing forwards who played for 80 minutes and not in spells of 10 or 20 these days for instance. So many debates and comparisons to be had !

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I am in my late fifties and still love and enjoy the game but I can see one of our problems, too many moaners complaining everything is poorer than the past yet when I see old matches from bygone years I cringe and think how poor was that. And for the poster who prefers football now I use to watch all sports football included now I haven't sat through a  football game for years it bores me. The game needs new fans not the many moaners who shout the loudest in our game. 

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If we keep applying the obstruction rule as it has been applied over the last few weeks in Super League and in the NRL, I might pack in too. We seem to have banned passing.

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Just now, Just Browny said:

If we keep applying the obstruction rule as it has been applied over the last few weeks in Super League and in the NRL, I might pack in too. We seem to have banned passing.

I brought this up on the Cheating thread a couple of weeks ago. I mean for gods sake a try was referred in the Hull v Leeds game for apparently obstructing the invisible man. It’s absolutely ridiculous.

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5 hours ago, PurstonJavelin said:

The last game of rugby league I ever watch.

Hull vs Leeds, April 2018

I used to thrill over tight defences broken by astute passes, breathtaking footwork, evasion and deception, perfectly executed leg tackles, the balance between attacking calculation and reactive defence. Not any more. Now the game is about wrestling, pushing, battering, impact, playing the referee, winning penalties, the important and game changing action mostly taking place on the floor. Standing up quickly after being tackled is now the most valuable skill in the game. The whole affair is accompanied by ridiculous hyperbole from the commentators, and the incessant nattering of a referee needing to manipulate the rules and attempting to choreograph the game to a preconceived pattern and pace. A referee so incapable of keeping a defence onside, he has to sprint forward at each play the ball to avoid giving a penalty. The game had two good passes - the lead commentator did not appear to have the wit to appreciate them - not enough for 80 minutes of involvement.

The game is no longer the greatest game, the most thrilling spectacle in sport. Super League, the most visible part of the sport, has become a tedious, uncomfortable, sometimes ugly, activity. The drama of a close score (that it seems suspiciously orchestrated is my own delusion), occasionally adds a last few minutes of interest to otherwise drabness.

What I used to enjoy is not coming back. Most other spectators want it as it is, and the top teams have an enormous vested interest in the status quo. And there’s no point in hanging about for the possible expansion, exciting though the prospect is: it will falter and fail because the sport is simply not as watchable as some think, not enough to capture the spending and attention and commitment of people who have an array of alternatives.

None of what this silly old dinosaur thinks matters: the game is better off without me. No big drama, but after a lifetime’s involvement, I think I’ll have a final word. Except I won’t be the last one to give up: there is a significant percentage of fans who are becoming increasingly disillusioned.  And I do need replacing. So can someone find a six year old to introduce to the sport, a new fan who will watch, play, teach, preach, coach and spectate for the next 50 years?

Bye. For good.

It's a shame you feel this way but it's a free country and I hope you find another sport/activity to occupy yourself with.Toodle who.

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Got to love an OP/Thread like this, a repository for every ill and all the anger in the game and then some .... disenchantment with the painting easy blame the picture!:biggrin:

 

Edited by Oxford

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I can certainly relate to the comments about an emphasis on wrestling and manipulation of the rules gradually eroding flair.

I think we are seeing parallels with this in many sports and I think, perhaps slightly counter-intuitively, it's largely because success has become almost too important. Whether it's the teams/athletes themselves or the public, people seem to crave sporting success like never before, couple that with the greater financial rewards at stake, and what you find is that teams/athletes in elite sport are now prepared to go to such extremes to win at all costs and afraid to take risks. Levels of professionalism, dedication and meticulous attention to detail, the aggregation of marginal gains to paraphrase cycling's Dave Brailsford, are producing fitter, more tactically aware, almost machine-like teams/athletes, who in team sports in particular, have become too adept at negating the opposition's threat, and that is killing some of the entertainment.

To give a more practical example to better illustrate what i'm getting at, I was having a discussion about football recently. Professional footballers today are fitter, better nourished and more tactically aware than ever before. Coaching sessions are more methodical, better planned, and defensive organisation is in another stratosphere compared to the 70s and 80s, even early 90s. I watch a fair bit of lower league and non-league football and in terms of being equipped to win games, those great Liverpool teams of the 70s for example with the same fitness and tactical awareness they had then, would struggle in League 2 now.

But what all this has achieved is to largely nullify the flair and entertainment from the game. Teams are so fit and well positioned now that if the opposition have a really creative player, they are able to keep up the levels of physical exertion and positional discipline required to simply crowd him out of the game for 90 minutes.

Sure these players still have their moments, freakish ones like Messi and Ronaldo more so than others, but these moments are largely isolated beacons of light in otherwise dreary affairs. Games have become like chess matches, like a game of chicken with each side just waiting for the other to make a mistake. Teams of yesteryear were not as well equipped to win football matches, but the games were more open, entertaining and contained more flair, precisely because teams were neither fit enough, organised enough or tactically astute enough to close a match down as a spectacle with the frequency they are able to do now. Nobody is prepared to take a risk anymore.

I see parallels in cricket too. When up against a world class batsman, the trend, rather than attempting to get him out with a good ball, is to frustrate him so he can't take the game away from you and try to induce a mistake through a war of attrition. Likewise when up against a world class bowler, it's a case of see him off till he gets tired and make hay against the weaker links. All perfectly understandable tactics of course, but not making for entertaining cricket. Again, an aversion to risk because success matters too much and the riches at stake can be life changing.

And returning to our very own RL, i think this is why we are seeing the game played more and more conservatively. Why throw the ball around, why try to find clever, instinctive, creative ways of breaking the line, why take a risk, when you can just learn to get the better of the ruck and to buy penalties. Slow down the opposition, get up quickly when you have the ball, win the game.

And you can't really blame them. Winning is the object of the game and they are just doing whatever they think makes that more likely, and I don't see how there's any going back from it, but it is killing some of the excitement for sure.

I'm not giving up on RL or the other sports i enjoy because we do still get those fleeting moments that get the juices flowing, they are fewer and further between but arguably all the more gripping for that when they do come along, and frankly i don't know what other hobbies i'd replace sport with haha. But it is a shame that sport as moved in this direction and i can understand why some people have fallen out of love with it.

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6 hours ago, PurstonJavelin said:

 And I do need replacing. So can someone find a six year old to introduce to the sport, a new fan who will watch, play, teach, preach, coach and spectate for the next 50 years?

Bye. For good.

Yeh, of course. I've got 26 of 'em running around in Nottinghamshire, enjoying their first season of Rugby League at Bassetlaw Bulldogs. Some have packed in their other sports participation to join in. 

Whilst I sympathise with your situation, we are very quick to dilute the draw it has for young children.

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I could never turn away as the game is ingrained in me , but you can’t just blithely criticise perspectives like that . It’s a sad indictment of how an increasing number of  people view things and the snowballing frustrations that accompany the spectacle. From the VR comfort blanket and the forensic analysis of a fast moving sport , to ever more robotic picky  interfering officiating , from cheating and manipulating from players to gain advantage and work that style of refereeing - and being coached , to the way the game is sanitised now .  Lots of things are changing the game a lot of us enjoyed as we grew up and not all change and ‘progress’ is for the best 

Edited by DavidM
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Not sure of the statistics, but the majority of issues I have are around the tackle and ruck with 3 specific areas:

1. These grab tackles waiting for players to come in, knock the player down and then lay on, in what is a ‘Dominant’ tackle, watching the Ref to call held, allows too much time for defences to reorganise.  Call held and penalise late tacklers and flops.

2. Ripping at the ball in gang tackles, leaving arms in around the ball and getting the arm trapped deliberately by the attacker.  Penalise any arms left through the armpit area by the defender.

3.  PTB.  Regain both feet first before the ball touches the ground.

Re the OP.  Things weren’t so perfect in the old days.  It was still a case of who can cheat best in the scrums and in the tackle.  Anyone remember the Cumberland Fling/Roll whatever tackle, stiff arm, shoulder check, leading with the elbow?  King hits, wedgies, spear tackles, thumb in the collar?  All common.

I’ll agree, that there aren’t the ball players there once were and I miss that.  I don’t see the chip over the top, or grub through in open play much either or many ball playing forwards.  

But, I see some great skills on show week in week out and don’t think it would take much to make the game an even better spectacle.  Maybe that’s why, barring Australia, we don’t have many household names here.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Just Browny said:

If we keep applying the obstruction rule as it has been applied over the last few weeks in Super League and in the NRL, I might pack in too. We seem to have banned passing.

Any try with ball movement and dummy runners they are totally spooked and checking it ... even if they’ve called a try and seen no obstruction . The pocket ref in the NRL is atrocious for this to piping up every try - check it , check it but start try ..! We then look at it 10 times to find a reason to disallow a good try . It’s try scoring game but we do our best to wipe them out for nothing that has any bearing on them! Often when a runner is going through at high speed and a defence is moving laterally you’ll get some contact . Judge it on actual obstruction or not rather than a black n white rigid viewpoint guessing what may happen or disregarding what actually is relevant ! Take obstruction off the VR and at least you’ll get consistency over all games , the VR won’t be judging things with a slide rule , it won’t be milked for telly , and games won’t last all day 

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Go watch some amateur rugby league while eating a pie and drinking a beer. It will make everything in the world great again.

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1 hour ago, DavidM said:

I could never turn away as the game is ingrained in me , but you can’t just blithely criticise perspectives like that

Yes absolutely right.

Turning away from the game because of what you feel it has lost is understandable but it never puts in the balance what it has gained.

I'm also not sure that disenchantment isn't just part of getting older and grouchier.

It is very sad when someone feels so strongly they see no other choice and I hope some friend of his makes him change his mind.

The comparison with yesterday is fraught with rosier than now obstructions to the view but my issue is not with all that, it's with threads being yet another discussion of how bad the game is now and my pet hate is this that and the other.

You can't have a go at yawn on here without it being whisked away but you can rip into the game, even when someone starts a positive thread, left - right and center.

That doesn't just seem odd, it seems wrong and strangely imbalanced to me.

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Excellent OP.

If rugby league followers for many decades are put off the sport by watching it on television,then the idea of 'boosting' the sport

by a viewing media ain't gonna work.

Sorting out the problems and getting people to attend the games is the way ahead.

It ain't gonna be an easy future...

 

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