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Salford Interview

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Nothing in there that shows thevimportance of owning your own ground, though, is there. 

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The new ground has become a white elephant for Salford 

 

would they be better sharing with the football club ? 

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2 hours ago, TheDuke said:

The new ground has become a white elephant for Salford 

 

would they be better sharing with the football club ? 

I think so.  But would the rfl let them play there.

 

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15 hours ago, TheDuke said:

The new ground has become a white elephant for Salford 

 

would they be better sharing with the football club ? 

Moore Lane had a capacity of 5,108. Salford FC have ambitions of becoming a football league side so I suppose it could be expanded 

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On ‎26‎/‎04‎/‎2018 at 2:49 PM, JohnM said:

Nothing in there that shows thevimportance of owning your own ground, though, is there. 

Do you mean other than the talk of income streams, saying the only money Salford receive on match day is the programme money and hospitality ? nothing from car parking, food sales or drink sales?

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Thats to do with the poor deal the club negotiated, not the fact they rent the stadium. The FA seem to think owning wembley isnt a good idea. HM Revenue and Customes dont think owning their premises is a good idea since in 2006 they sold them all to a company based in a tax haven.

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"I think you kind of get the team you deserve..." :O

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Owning your own stadium is definitely the best strategy if you can use it to generate additional income streams. There's no coincidence that Leeds and Warrington are the strongest teams financially in the league and the motor behind them is the additional revenue of non-RL business. Just owning it isn't enough, it has to be in the right place and offer the right sort of facilities that will generate business.

It also helps if you can rent it out to homeless clubs from other sports 😊

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And if you can get better RoI that way than renting a stadium on the right terms and investing your money in the team snd grass roots development etc. Its just not true that owning your own stadium is better than renting. It all depends, and its vital that a club-owned  stadium doesn't get sold off by the directors for other purposes.

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So how would Salford pay to own the stadium? It's not as if the construction is free.

Didn't the doctor also say they have the best deal in the sport?

Seems an easy way to deflect from the fact Salford are simply badly supported. I travel over 2 hours each way to see the Broncos, so have no sympathy with whether the ground is easy to get to and from.

Another licensing waste of time and hopefully a more progressive club takes their place.

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On 26/04/2018 at 3:43 PM, TheDuke said:

The new ground has become a white elephant for Salford 

 

would they be better sharing with the football club ? 

Why, they wouldn't own that either so would have little/any income from it.

Salford's problem is that they believed the RFL threats about removing franchises from old, non complaint , grounds and sold theirs, entered into a poor commitment for the Salford Community stadiuml, which just as they were moving became a terrible deal!

As they were about to move they nearly  went  belly up and hadn't the money to lease the shop, buy the naming rights, which went else where.

Neither was it Salford's fault that the promised roads/infrastructure were completed 5 years later than promised.

In fairness to Salford Council they gave Salford at least 2 years rent free, but despite his efforts MK did not get the support he expected.

The new board are left with little way to generate money from the stadium and fans who refuse to pay for ways they do.

As for the new Salford FC ground it does not comply with RFL min criteria for capacity, car parking or coporate seats but neither does Castleford or Wakefield and that brings up full circle to Salford trying to comply with RFL rules.

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, kiyan said:

As for the new Salford FC ground it does not comply with RFL min criteria for capacity, car parking or coporate seats but neither does Castleford or Wakefield and that brings up full circle to Salford trying to comply with RFL rules.

I'm intrigued - what is the RFL minimum criteria for capacity, car parking and corporate seats?

Edited by AB Knight

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9 hours ago, kiyan said:

Why, they wouldn't own that either so would have little/any income from it.

Understand the points you made. If they owned a stadium, they'd have money tied up in ownership that they might use more productively in developing the club, the team, bring in new fans etc. 

Ref: Brighton https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldstone_Ground

The ground was sold by the board, who were trying to clear the club's mounting debts in an attempt to avoid bankruptcy, although no alternative football ground had been lined up, and the fans were not consulted.[7] The then-chairman, Bill Archer, aimed to profit from the sale of the lucrative development land on which the Goldstone stood. A ground-share with Portsmouth never materialised and the club eventually arranged a ground-share with Gillingham at their Priestfield Stadium, over 70 miles from Brighton

The sale of the club's stadium provoked two pitch invasions by angry fans in protest against it. A pitch invasion late in the 1995-96 season, when the Seagulls were relegated to Division Three, resulted in a suspended sentence of three points deducted and a game played behind closed doors for the club. A similar protest on 1 October 1996 in a league game against Lincoln City meant that a Football League hearing on 9 December that year saw them deducted two league points.[8] The club later appealed against the points deduction but their appeal was rejected, although ultimately they still managed to avoid relegation from the Football League by a narrow margin that year.[9]

The Goldstone Ground was sold to property developers and it has since been redeveloped as a@a retail park

 

then there was Station Road, Central Park etc..

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