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For those of you with an interest in less headline-hitting sports, you might like to note that on Saturday, 15th Septemebr, the Scottish Highland sport of shinty has its 'big day' - the Scottish Cup final, which will be played this year in Oban.

The game will be a rematch of last year's, with Newtonmore taking on Lovat.  Newtonmore, who have won this silverware 32 times, are looking for their third success in a row.  Lovat have two previous victories, in 1953 and 2015.  Newtonmore hail from the Spey valley village of that name; Lovat play in the village of Balgate, out to the west in Inverness.

I mention all this because, if you cannot get to Oban, you can watch the match live on BBC Scotland, I would think, more specifically, BBC2 Scotland.  the game starts at 2pm.

In England, in both rugby league and soccer, there is concern that the knock-out cup formula is losing its appeal.  Perhaps it is a cultural thing (within the culture of a particular sport, that is), for shinty devotees still see the Scottish Cup (more formally the Camanachd Association Challenge Cup) as the top trophy.  Although dating back to 1896, it is not the oldest extant one; another knock-out cup still played for - the Glasgow Celtic Society Cup - predates it, but is only for teams in the south of the shinty-playing area, whereas the Scottish is for all parts. 

At one time, some decades ago, the Scottish Cup was the only national competition.  Even then, it was regionally based up to the final, which pitted the best southern team against the best from the north.  Leagues, meanwhile, were regional.  Then the Scottish opted for an open draw in the last few rounds.  The pressure for this came from northern clubs, fed up with a run of one-sided finals in which the north reps won easily.  Sod's Law worked its magic; the first 'open' final featured two southern teams!  Then came a national league competition, followed by a second division at the national level, which is where we are nowadays. 

Yet still the Scottish Cup remains pre-eminent.  Culture and tradition can be strange things!

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8 minutes ago, Wiltshire Warrior Dragon said:

For those of you with an interest in less headline-hitting sports, you might like to note that on Saturday, 15th Septemebr, the Scottish Highland sport of shinty has its 'big day' - the Scottish Cup final, which will be played this year in Oban.

The game will be a rematch of last year's, with Newtonmore taking on Lovat.  Newtonmore, who have won this silverware 32 times, are looking for their third success in a row.  Lovat have two previous victories, in 1953 and 2015.  Newtonmore hail from the Spey valley village of that name; Lovat play in the village of Balgate, out to the west in Inverness.

I mention all this because, if you cannot get to Oban, you can watch the match live on BBC Scotland, I would think, more specifically, BBC2 Scotland.  the game starts at 2pm.

In England, in both rugby league and soccer, there is concern that the knock-out cup formula is losing its appeal.  Perhaps it is a cultural thing (within the culture of a particular sport, that is), for shinty devotees still see the Scottish Cup (more formally the Camanachd Association Challenge Cup) as the top trophy.  Although dating back to 1896, it is not the oldest extant one; another knock-out cup still played for - the Glasgow Celtic Society Cup - predates it, but is only for teams in the south of the shinty-playing area, whereas the Scottish is for all parts. 

At one time, some decades ago, the Scottish Cup was the only national competition.  Even then, it was regionally based up to the final, which pitted the best southern team against the best from the north.  Leagues, meanwhile, were regional.  Then the Scottish opted for an open draw in the last few rounds.  The pressure for this came from northern clubs, fed up with a run of one-sided finals in which the north reps won easily.  Sod's Law worked its magic; the first 'open' final featured two southern teams!  Then came a national league competition, followed by a second division at the national level, which is where we are nowadays. 

Yet still the Scottish Cup remains pre-eminent.  Culture and tradition can be strange things!

We don't play for fame. We don't play for cash.

We just play for the glory and the clash of the ash.....

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