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3 minutes ago, graveyard johnny said:

one thing you notice about quiz shows, when teachers are on they rank  amongst the biggest dim wits ever to be asked to display knowledge, the young ones in particular are as thick as...………..

And university students . Pointless etc a lot of them are worryingly devoid of general intelligence . Two young lasses doing some course or other like make up studies were asked ‘ name a city in the northern hemisphere ‘ and when they couldn’t say London both said it wasn’t their strong subject . It isn’t my subject is something you hear a lot

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3 minutes ago, DavidM said:

And university students . Pointless etc a lot of them are worryingly devoid of general intelligence . Two young lasses doing some course or other like make up studies were asked ‘ name a city in the northern hemisphere ‘ and when they couldn’t say London both said it wasn’t their strong subject . It isn’t my subject is something you hear a lot

its before my time

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9 minutes ago, graveyard johnny said:

its before my time

You’re not missing much . And smug Richard Osman is on it

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I never really bonded with my teachers at school except maybe the ones who allowed me some leeway to resubmit my published football fanzine opinion pieces as schoolwork!  

I did enough work though to get the qualifications I needed to get to further and then higher education later.

I would say all my Blackburn college tutors deserve the real plaudits though for helping to shape a young mind and rekindle a passion for creativity that the school curriculum had driven away.

 

Edited by Gerrumonside ref
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6 hours ago, damp squib said:

It's horrifying to look back as an adult on the let's, say "unreformed" teachers at your school and you realise they were often people with severe mental health issues who should never have been working in that environment. That's leaving aside the small number of out and out sadists.

There was a period, following the two World Wars, when a lot of pretty badly-damaged survivors fell into teaching as a last resort. The qualifications were not particularly rigorous at the time.

Gabbitas & Thring have a lot to answer for.

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Nuns .... gee whizz they were full of peaceful Christian values . Not ! A lot of folk who went to catholic schools will tell you how petrifying they were !

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2 hours ago, DavidM said:

Nuns .... gee whizz they were full of peaceful Christian values . Not ! A lot of folk who went to catholic schools will tell you how petrifying they were !

I and several of my mates got the strap many times from a nun at school. She was about 4ft 2 but Jesus could she hit hard.

And apart from becoming a sexual deviant, it never did me any harm.

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1 minute ago, Johnoco said:

I and several of my mates got the strap many times from a nun at school. She was about 4ft 2 but Jesus could she hit hard.

And apart from becoming a sexual deviant, it never did me any harm.

I remember them to this day . The ruler on the hand was a fave and she seemed to enjoy it ....then they took sex education class , which was interesting . Maybe it was part of that class , who knows ...

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On ‎9‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 12:30 PM, ckn said:

Beyond him, all of my teachers were excellent and thoroughly proved to me that the comprehensive system worked well with the right people behind it. 

Whereas my experience of the comprehensive system was a disaster.  Only one teacher was worth the title; the rest were on a scale of mediocre to terrible.  One teacher - Rimmer, the history teacher (a subject I loved) - used to join in with my school bullies.  Another teacher - he taught French and was so inconsequential I can no longer remember his name - he didn't bother teaching at all but instead let us read our own books or play games.  The one teacher at my comp who actually taught was Mrs Calderbank, the English teacher.  She cared about those of us too nervous to speak up in class and who weren't in the automatic O level groups (because my comp was streamed - A1 to A3 were automatic O level entries, A4 to A5 joint O level/CSE and A6 to A10 CSE only, yet Labour made grammar schools illegal!)  I was in A4 so had to do twice the work of the O level only streams but with teachers who had less than half the wish to teach us.

Fortunately for me I spent my first two years of high school at a private school where every teacher was committed to the teaching cause even if they weren't all very good.  My French teacher there was called Miss Brittain and she would not tolerate any of us speaking in anything other than French for every minute of every class.  As a result, while I failed my French O level (got a U, and I'm surprised I scored that well after my comp experience), my basics were good and my spoken French very good.

But I do agree that a teacher can make or break a child.  The English teacher Mrs Calderbank gave me belief that I was good at something and I sailed through my English O levels.  However, the damage was done overall and it took me until I was in my late 30s to get two As at A level in each English and go on to get a high 2:1 in English Language & Literature.  It was only when I gained confidence from that achievement that I was finally able to conquer my greatest fear: maths.  From being ritually humiliated in my maths classes at comp (Did I actually have a maths teacher? I don't remember), I finally passed maths GCSE with a C at night class in 2008.  It took me 25 years to recover from what my comp maths teachers did to my confidence and education.

 

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17 minutes ago, Johnoco said:

I and several of my mates got the strap many times from a nun at school. She was about 4ft 2 but Jesus could she hit hard.

And apart from becoming a sexual deviant, it never did me any harm.

lol!

The strap (for the boys) and the slipper (for the girls) were still in play at my comp when I went there.  How many students were punished in that way I don't know.  I had to do lines a few times because I kept leaving the school grounds at lunchtime to indulge in Pimbletts meat and potato pies from the shop across the road.  I would go to my friend's house who was based near the school.  As I travelled in by bus I was supposed to stay on campus.  No chance.  I hated the place.  Any opportunity to leave for an hour or so, I did!

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Must say I never bought in to the rhythmic “ it’s for your own good , you’ll thank me for it one day “ as you were being instilled with this discipline . More likely I’ll punch you in the face if I see you one day !!

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Reminiscing about public school, it wasn't just the teaching staff who were out of the ordinary. When I first started at the school in Cambridge, the matron was an ancient woman known (unofficially and officially) as "Matey" whose treatment for pretty much everything was an aspirin and a cup of tea.

Later, she was replaced by someone who'd come from another school and always talked about how much better her previous school was, until we realised she was winding us up. She was a good laugh really, and once bought me a chocolate bar for bloodying the nose of a spoilt brat who was bullying some of the pupils.

The under-matrons, on the other hand, were a different and much younger bunch. One was a former Miss Austria... and she wasn't even the most attractive one on on the staff! 😍

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