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AlexHaldane

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Everything posted by AlexHaldane

  1. Inflation doesn't affect buying power? The £ to € rate has fallen 8% in 12 months. Given the referendum resultshouldn't you have considered exchange rate fluctuations when moving amounts of money? You made the choice to move to a country that uses a failed currency and is never going to recover from it's debt crisis.
  2. Apple has several EU companies and shifts money around. I've no doubt it holds large reserves to trade on the exchange.
  3. In the region of 480,000 UK 18 to 24 year old are NEETS. Jumps to nearer 800,000 if you use 16-24 range.
  4. Why do you keep saying the UK economy has tanked? Which economic indicators say this is the case? It's price increases in Q3 last year were related to a new range of devices & on apps. Blamed on Brexit of course a fluctuation in a currency currency they weren't pegged to. 12 months ago the exchange rate meant £1 would yield $1.44 and $1 would yield £0.69. At today's exchange rate £1 would yield $1.25 and $1 would yield £0.80 Let's say an Apple Mac has for the last 12 months been sold at a landed UK price of $1000 and there is a 50% profit margin. 12 months ago that $1000 price would have yielded £690. Today, that same $1000 price would yield £800. A fall in the value of domestic currency increases the price of imports. How has the fall in the value of Sterling decrease profits for Apple? Simple case of premium pricing being applied and a convenient excuse needing to be found. Bit like Jamie Oliver saying Brexit stopped his restaurants from being popular enough to survive. I blame the EU. They are the ones who have slapped this thieving corporate giant, the world's largest company, with a multi billion € tax bill for funnelling massive profits through Ireland. How anyone can try to defend these greedy thieves and all the other global players, and companies that move money around and siphon it off through EU and offshore shell companies is baffling.
  5. Can I suggest you are able to say something other than it's all Brexit's fault? You do realise that institutions can manipulate markets. Hard economic facts aren't needed. Now, call me cynical, but the US can now buy all the British goods it could before 23rd June at a 20% discount. Sounds like a good enough reason to spook the markets & use Brexit. Unless of course there are genuine reasons why this fall happened. Maybe you can explain the economic factors that brought this fall in the £? No inflation spike, no QE, no interest rate rises, no oversupply of £s etc etc
  6. You seem incapable of distinguishing between the two. Input prices for Apple & Microsoft have not changed. Therefore why increase your prices. Yes, their products become more expensive to UK consumers, so it takes more £ to buy the same amount. They may possibly sell fewer units in the UK due to a weaker £. Though this equally may not be the case. A price increase when your factor inputs don't increase and you are selling into a weaker currency is corporate rip off tactics. Surprises me that they are being defended, such is the power of brand loyalty. Have European car makers put their prices up?
  7. Your point is what? Blame Brexit, but no emanation of what has actually changed to cause this fall. The £ at one time could buy $2.
  8. No argument from me that a lower £ makes dollar goods more expensive. Total rejection of the suggestion that a weaker £ means the likes of Apple & Microsoft have to increaseretail.prices & Brexit is blamed.
  9. That is not what Apple & Microsoft are doing. They are increasing their purchase price to UK consumers, on top of UK consumers buying power for dollar products falling. It is a double hit. Sterling has taken a drop, but it also brings benefits. How is pointing out that they are ripping customers off trolling?
  10. So you agree Ape etc are simply ripping consumers off. If your suppliers trade in £'s and buy their products in dollars, they will get less for the same. So Brexit has seen a rise in UK interest rates andinflation figures are wrong? Plenty of ONS data out there.
  11. Currently half of what you said it was. What is the inflation rate in Greece? Are you seriously saying domestic inflation does not affect the cost of living?
  12. The cost of living is measured by CPI and RPI. These have not altered by the exchange rate fluctuation. British consumers may well be able to buy less for the same amount of money in dollar terms ég 20% fewer dollars per £ for that trip to Florida. Apple & Microsoft are simply screwing consumers. How can a stronger dollar lead to price hikes, when products are made in countries like China, which itself enjoyed a near 10% rise in value against Sterling. Corporate greed under the guise of Brexit.
  13. There hasn't been that sort of fluctuation in the Sterling/Euro exchange rate. Perhaps the mess Greece is in is the contributory factor.
  14. How are you 15 -20% worse off when inflation isn't running at that level? The only real price increase has been fuel, and that is nothing to do with Brexit.
  15. The markets backed a remain vote. Losing that bet spooked market confidence in Sterling which was devaluing beforehand. Other things being equal, which they are, shows the value of the £ pre 23rd June was artificially high. The UK economy hasn't shrunk, inflation is stable, interest rates have not changed. The £ is a stable currency. It is one of the foibles of capitalism that confidence in any commodity, and not reality, can dictate fluctuations. And of course, it's not in the interests of the US to increase the value of the $ against the £. The closer it is to the dolla/euro exchange rate, the better it is for their trade balance. HuHuge increase in trade at a 20% discount.
  16. Check any UK economy stats. Only substantive change pre & post 23rd June is the vote. The same financial institutions that caused the crash are now paragon of virtue?
  17. Yes, markets never ever operate on anything other than hard facts. There is never any speculation or for casting. Traders and institutions don't seek to make profits on how commodities perform. House values can be massively inflated so that lenders and builders can inflate profits, but currency can't?
  18. The markets backed a remain vote. Losing that bet spooked market confidence in Sterling which was devaluing beforehand. Other things being equal, which they are, shows the value of the £ pre 23rd June was artificially high. The UK economy hasn't shrunk, inflation is stable, interest rates have not changed. The £ is a stable currency. It is one of the foibles of capitalism that confidence in any commodity, and not reality, can dictate fluctuations.
  19. Absolutely right. The £ was over inflated by the markets and not based in reality. It hit domestic purchasing power, but this was offset on a macro scale by the commensurate increase in demand from currencies that gained buying power. There has been no real effect of the fall. The CPI & RPI aren't rampant, there's been no QE and the consumer debt time bomb hasn't detonated. Now ask Greece, Italy, Spain, Slovakia, Ireland and many other EU states how they are doing with the Euro.
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