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spuggies and jackdaws and hedgehogs and frogs


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Really pleased to see a hedgehog shuffling round the garden in the last few days. It's been years since I saw one. Nice addition to the woodpecker on the feeders.

 

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After going missing for a couple of years found a couple of Wood Warbler nests in the wood by Crummock water , both successfully fledged , going tonight to Loweswater a male has been singing there but no sign of a female and time is running out .The time of year for Spotted Flycatchers to nest as well .

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Three juvenile grey wagtails flitting around the banks of Meanwood Beck in north Leeds this afternoon, moving in unison presumably as recently fledged siblings (anyone know?).

We have resident pied wagtails on the field of our cricket club too, but I never wondered they whey wag until today.

https://www.discoverwildlife.com/animal-facts/birds/why-do-wagtails-wag/

It's also made me realise that it's probably another wildlife misnomer, as they don't actually wag but bob up and down.

 

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  • 1 month later...

For birds, this is always a quiet time of year - literally.  Not much singing and calling going on, for a mix of reasons.

However, a couple of times in recent days I have heard one of the more endearing sounds of mid to late summer in the New Forest.

I can recognise an adult buzzard's 'mewing' call.  These last couple of times, it has been accompanied by what sounds like one calling, but with a bit of a sore throat - very squeaky and uneven!  It is in fact a fledged youngster being shown the arts of drifting, thermal riding and diving by one or both parents, and keeping in touch by calling out regularly.

As I say, very characteristic of this point in the calendar.

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I’ve got a baby blackbird I’ve named Cuthbert to eat sultanas out of my hand. Bold as brass it is . It started off by standing on my back doorstep and wouldn’t move when I wanted in , then a day later he was being hand fed 

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  • 2 weeks later...
22 hours ago, Futtocks said:

 

I believe I am right in saying that the inventor of subbuteo table football was a keen birdwatcher; he hoped his invention would become a popular hobby and hence called it that - 'subbuteo' as in 'falco subbuteo', a hobby!

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3 minutes ago, Wiltshire Warrior Dragon said:

I believe I am right in saying that the inventor of subbuteo table football was a keen birdwatcher; he hoped his invention would become a popular hobby and hence called it that - 'subbuteo' as in 'falco subbuteo', a hobby!

Almost; the inventor Peter Adolph wanted to call the game "Hobby" but it was considered too generic a name to be trademarked. So, being an ornithologiist, he came up with the name we know today.

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"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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I've only seen a hobby once, when one rocked up at Worsbrough Dam in Barnsley, which was my local patch. There is, or at least was, a swallow roost in the reedbeds there and the hobby was filling its boots. Spectacular to watch.

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