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I'm going in the other direction: I'm teaching myself to cook steak properly

I get a bit irritated by the patronising attitude of people on tv who say that people on a limited budget should buy cheap meat forgetting that cooking the stuff knocks hell out if a limited energy bill

There's a good little video on the Donald Russell website that shows how to cook steak (well one way of cooking steak). I got some steaks off them when they were doing one of their many 'special offers' and have to say it was rather good.

 

I have recently found a local butcher who can tell me exactly which farm his meat comes from (and sounds convincing so probably isn't talking BS) and has some nice cuts at decent prices. Always big queues there so he must be doing something right.

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I agree with you

I'm a long and slow fan

As for the steak that's pretty much what I do

I get my meat from this place in Sheffield that you have to be a member of and you can only join if you are a public servant some good gear and very cheap

Sounds like Costco

Thank you for your valuable contribution.

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I agree with you

I'm a long and slow fan

As for the steak that's pretty much what I do

I get my meat from this place in Sheffield that you have to be a member of and you can only join if you are a public servant some good gear and very cheap

The missus' brother lives in Sheffield and absolutely swears by the Real Meat company.

Fides invicta triumphat

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Newcastle Brown ice cream. No, really! It is actually very nice.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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There's a good little video on the Donald Russell website that shows how to cook steak (well one way of cooking steak). I got some steaks off them when they were doing one of their many 'special offers' and have to say it was rather good.

I have recently found a local butcher who can tell me exactly which farm his meat comes from (and sounds convincing so probably isn't talking BS) and has some nice cuts at decent prices. Always big queues there so he must be doing something right.

My butcher has his cows in a shed outside the shop.

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I just had a mega sandwich.

 

A full cheesy white baton with spread, tomato puree, brie, blue cheese, smoked bavarian, tomato and onion. All bought from Sainsbury's (bar the butter) for under £4. It probably weighed the same too. Full as ####.

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I just had a mega sandwich.

 

A full cheesy white baton with spread, tomato puree, brie, blue cheese, smoked bavarian, tomato and onion. All bought from Sainsbury's (bar the butter) for under £4. It probably weighed the same too. Full as ####.

If you like mega-sarnies, see if there's a Vietnamese place anywhere near you that does Banh Mi.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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If you like mega-sarnies, see if there's a Vietnamese place anywhere near you that does Banh Mi.

I don't think there's owt like that in Westhoughton! Possibly on the correct side of the hill when I get home, but it won't do owt for meat and fish free Friday though!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just ordered lots of meat from a local farm. Most of it are cuts I have cooked before but I added a load of oxtail which I have never cooked before.

 

Has anybody got any good oxtail recipes that they would be kind enough to post on here that I could try?

 

Thanks 

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I just ordered lots of meat from a local farm. Most of it are cuts I have cooked before but I added a load of oxtail which I have never cooked before.

 

Has anybody got any good oxtail recipes that they would be kind enough to post on here that I could try?

 

Thanks

Fantastic in a stew. Fry them to brown,

In a casserole dish add Celery, Carrot, swede, potato, garlic and onions (plus anything lurking in cupboard or fridge).

Add beef stock, red wine or beer. Season with pepper and salt

Cook long and slooooooooow- 4 hours at least.

30 minutes before the end check the seasoning and add dumplings.

Ron Banks

Midlands Hurricanes and Barrow

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Fantastic in a stew. Fry them to brown,

In a casserole dish add Celery, Carrot, swede, potato, garlic and onions (plus anything lurking in cupboard or fridge).

Add beef stock, red wine or beer. Season with pepper and salt

Cook long and slooooooooow- 4 hours at least.

30 minutes before the end check the seasoning and add dumplings.

Can't go much wrong with that, really. I probably wouldn't have swede in there, personally. A couple* of smoked oysters can add to the flavour, as would 2 or 3 crushed juniper berries and some thyme.

 

*which means you can pig out on the rest of the tin - chef's privilege! B) 

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Can't go much wrong with that, really. I probably wouldn't have swede in there, personally. A couple* of smoked oysters can add to the flavour, as would 2 or 3 crushed juniper berries and some thyme.

 

*which means you can pig out on the rest of the tin - chef's privilege! B)

 

Thanks to both. I've never tried smoked oysters so will add some to the shopping list.

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I've spotted these little bottles in a couple of delis recently - Uncle Roy's Comestible Concoctions. They look interesting, so I've bought the juniper and sage ones. I also bought a jar of their oak smoked red chillis, which smell amazing.

Edited by Futtocks

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Chefs always say that frozen peas are as good as fresh.

But what are they for? They are usually used as a dressing and in my opinion add nothing to a meal, they are almost impossible to transfer from the plate to the mouth without spilling.

For me the best way with peas is to use dried and have them as mushed.

I remember in East Anglia that peas used to be sold as a fast food snack with vinegar and they were alright too.

So what's the best thing to do with garden peas?

Edited by bearman

Ron Banks

Midlands Hurricanes and Barrow

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Fresh peas, eaten raw straight from the pod and in season, are the best! Much better than frozen, the peas and pods should be deep vivid green, juicy and sweet.

 

Trouble is, the peak of the season is short, and soon the 'fresh' peas you get are pale, clothy and tasteless. So, for the rest of the year, use frozen.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Chefs always say that frozen peas are as good as fresh.

But what are they for? They are usually used as a dressing and in my opinion add nothing to a meal, they are almost impossible to transfer from the plate to the mouth without spilling.

For me the best way with peas is to use dried and have them as mushed.

I remember in East Anglia that peas used to be sold as a fast food snack with vinegar and they were alright too.

So what's the best thing to do with garden peas?

You're a bloody savage Banks. God knows what the buffet will be like on Saturday.

The Unicorn is not a Goose,

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Fresh peas, eaten raw straight from the pod and in season, are the best! Much better than frozen, the peas and pods should be deep vivid green, juicy and sweet.

 

Trouble is, the peak of the season is short, and soon the 'fresh' peas you get are pale, clothy and tasteless. So, for the rest of the year, use frozen.

Agree, we grew peas last year and our kids were picking and eating them raw, I don't think we managed to get any into the kitchen let alone cook them.

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