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  • 2 weeks later...
59 minutes ago, hindle xiii said:

Does anyone know what variety the supermarket 'baking potato' is?

Ta.

Could be anything. Probably varies from supermarket to supermarket and from season to season. Most common UK varieties would be King Edward, White or Russet, I reckon. I assume they just sort out the largest spuds before packing and label them according to ideal use.

You tend to get more specific breeds at the smaller end of the market, like Vivaldi, Pink Fir Apples, Jersey Royals etc.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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1 hour ago, hindle xiii said:

Does anyone know what variety the supermarket 'baking potato' is?

Ta.

I think they grade baking potatoes by size. Very often Cara and in my opinion they aren't very good. 

 Maris  Piper, King Edward or Desire make the best jacket potatoes but Roosters are ok too.

Tesco only sell Maris  Piper prebagged in mixed size bags.  My local greengrocer sells them loose. 

As a matter of interest I was going into Lidl last week for some items.  I needed some fruit and veg and so I noted the prices in the greengrocers as I passed by. 

The prices of the same items in Lidl were far higher than the greengrocer and the quality was no were nearly as good. 

 

Any recommendations for alternative bakers as good as MP or KE's would be gratefully received

Edited by Bearman

Ron Banks

Midlands Hurricanes and Barrow

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  • 2 weeks later...
17 minutes ago, Moose said:

Stockdale's of Yorkshire, a newish Leeds restaurant whose speciality is Wagu beef have an 8oz fillet on the menu priced at £42, sauce is an extra £3. I didn't order one.

Could be worse...

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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I have some lamb neck marinating for tomorrow, in olive oil, smoked paprika, oregano and garlic. Should be good.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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On the Rant thread, Bleep mentioned eating black pudding at St.Helens and liking it. I have a question but didn't want to derail the other thread, so here it is.

Bleep didn't mention how his black pudding had been cooked. Today, it seems that the default method for this delicacy is frying slices of the long, cylindrical stuff wrapped in plastic (edit: remove the plastic before frying). However, when I was young, my mum used to buy it in a real skin, tied in 'horseshoe' shape. She would boil it for about 5 minutes and serve it for tea with lots of pepper, bread and butter and a large cup of tea. When I first came across fried black pudding, I was quite taken aback.

Does anyone else do boiled black pudding?

 

Edited by tonyXIII

Rethymno Rugby League Appreciation Society

Founder (and, so far, only) member.

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1 hour ago, tonyXIII said:

On the Rant thread, Bleep mentioned eating black pudding at St.Helens and liking it. I have a question but didn't want to derail the other thread, so here it is.

Bleep didn't mention how his black pudding had been cooked. Today, it seems that the default method for this delicacy is frying slices of the long, cylindrical stuff wrapped in plastic (edit: remove the plastic before frying). However, when I was young, my mum used to buy it in a real skin, tied in 'horseshoe' shape. She would boil it for about 5 minutes and serve it for tea with lots of pepper, bread and butter and a large cup of tea. When I first came across fried black pudding, I was quite taken aback.

Does anyone else do boiled black pudding?

Sometimes I include pieces of black pudding (or its Spanish cousin, morcilla*) in a stew. I've never boiled it whole on its own, but I have heard of it being done 

*There are different types, but I prefer the one with rice in the mix. It often also contains onion and a little paprika.

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"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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5 hours ago, tonyXIII said:

On the Rant thread, Bleep mentioned eating black pudding at St.Helens and liking it. I have a question but didn't want to derail the other thread, so here it is.

Bleep didn't mention how his black pudding had been cooked. Today, it seems that the default method for this delicacy is frying slices of the long, cylindrical stuff wrapped in plastic (edit: remove the plastic before frying). However, when I was young, my mum used to buy it in a real skin, tied in 'horseshoe' shape. She would boil it for about 5 minutes and serve it for tea with lots of pepper, bread and butter and a large cup of tea. When I first came across fried black pudding, I was quite taken aback.

Does anyone else do boiled black pudding?

 

I've always had it fried for breakfast but a bloke I worked with years back used to boil it. He was from near Bury and claimed that boiled was the traditional way of eating it.

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30 minutes ago, clwydianrange said:

I've always had it fried for breakfast but a bloke I worked with years back used to boil it. He was from near Bury and claimed that boiled was the traditional way of eating it.

I lived in North Manchester as a boy, so Bury was just up the road. Maybe it was a local thing.

Thanks to you and Futtocks for the replies.

 

Rethymno Rugby League Appreciation Society

Founder (and, so far, only) member.

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Performance Kitchen - Recipes from sportspeople, including RL players. Here's an example:

 

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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  • 2 weeks later...

A marinade, loosely based on Korean BBQ flavours, used in this case for pork shoulder.
4 tbsp soy sauce
2 tbsp water
1 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp sesame oil
½ tbsp minced fresh ginger root
2 tbsp chopped spring onions
1 dried chipotle chilli
salt
pepper

The pork was marinated overnight, then cooked in a slow cooker with shallots, garlic, tomato paste and white wine.

Turned out nice.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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  • 3 weeks later...

Shanghai-style braised pork - based loosely on this recipe: http://thewoksoflife.com/2014/04/shanghai-style-braised-pork-belly/
 
To the ingredients listed in that recipe, I added a piece of cassia bark and half a star anise.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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  • 2 weeks later...

Since the imposition of "the diet" (I've lost a stone since Xmas)  my choices are a bit restricted, but one thing I've come to really like is mackerel fillets, fried in the one cal. spray oil.  Really tasty. I'm having them for lunch today.

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“Few thought him even a starter.There were many who thought themselves smarter. But he ended PM, CH and OM. An Earl and a Knight of the Garter.”

Clement Attlee.

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1 minute ago, Trojan said:

Since the imposition of "the diet" (I've lost a stone since Xmas)  my choices are a bit restricted, but one thing I've come to really like is mackerel fillets, fried in the one cal. spray oil.  Really tasty. I'm having them for lunch today.

I once grilled mackerel over a wood fire - the flavour of the fish and the smoke was amazing! I also reserved two of the cooked fish to make a paté, which also worked really well.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Used the 'easy but impressive' section of BBC Good Food to make this yesterday.

Accurate on both counts.  Very easy and very tasty.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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I've been one to eats bacon every morning. Good bacon on good bread is probably what I would ask for as my choice of last meal on earth.

However, not so surprisingly I'm enjoying substituting bacon with kippers on occasion has been wonderful. Good smokey kippers with a poached egg.... top breaky

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