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Party leftovers for lunch today, so we layered cold pancakes alternately with sliced ham and grated cheddar (about 10 layers), then baked it in the oven 'til the cheese was melting. Served sliced like a cake. Pretty good for an improvised meal!

Edited by Futtocks

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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1 minute ago, getdownmonkeyman said:

Brie and Iberico Ham on crusty white bread.

Iberico ham is fabulous, when you get the good stuff and don't serve it fridge-cold.

I have some ribs marinating overnight for tomorrow night.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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I have bought myself some small amounts of beluga and baerii caviar and some high end salmon roe as a little surprise treat for a party this weekend.

I’ve only really served the affordable run-of-the-mill lumpfish caviar on blinis with cream cheese and Scottish smoked salmon before - which is a nice treat in itself with a bit of the fizzy stuff.

I’m thinking of doing the same with the small amounts of beluga, baerii and salmon roe unless anyone has any other serving suggestions?

Going to be drinking a mix of rose bubbly: Laurent Perrier Curvee NV, Camel Valley ‘Raymond Blanc’ English Sparkling and a Hambledon English Sparkling.

 

Edited by Gerrumonside ref
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7 hours ago, Gerrumonside ref said:

I have bought myself some small amounts of beluga and baerii caviar and some high end salmon roe as a little surprise treat for a party this weekend.

I’ve only really served the affordable run-of-the-mill lumpfish caviar on blinis with cream cheese and Scottish smoked salmon before - which is a nice treat in itself with a bit of the fizzy stuff.

I’m thinking of doing the same with the small amounts of beluga, baerii and salmon roe unless anyone has any other serving suggestions?

Going to be drinking a mix of rose bubbly: Laurent Perrier Curvee NV, Camel Valley ‘Raymond Blanc’ English Sparkling and a Hambledon English Sparkling.

 

What we have for Christmas brunch (our main meal is later than lunchtime). Mini Croustade cups (little cups made of thin, crusty pastry), with a little cream cheese in the bottom, then a small tip-leaf of fresh basil, a prawn, a couple of curled strips of cold-smoked salmon, and finally topped with either a little lumpfish or salmon roe.

As for the Beluga and Baerii, I'd serve the best one completely unadorned with anything that detracts from the flavour, just with triangles of thin-cut toast to spoon the caviare onto.

Then maybe do the traditional Russian accompaniments for the other one - hard boiled egg yolks & whites, chives, creme fraiche, capers, and red onions.

Or there will be a ton of other interesting serving ideas on t'web. The internet's more recipes than porn these days; I don't know what the world's coming to, I really don't.

Edited by Futtocks
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"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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On 09/05/2018 at 3:12 PM, Futtocks said:

Party leftovers for lunch today, so we layered cold pancakes alternately with sliced ham and grated cheddar (about 10 layers), then baked it in the oven 'til the cheese was melting. Served sliced like a cake. Pretty good for an improvised meal!

Lovely . Ham n cheese is a great combo although pancakes is a new one but sounds nice

Edited by DavidM
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You are all eating much better than me at the moment. I just discovered you can customise the burgers at Mcdonalds so i had a double cheese burger, with extra cheese, extra pickles, extra onions, bacon, lettuce (but i didn't want to pay 20p for tomato)and small chips. £3 total, i thought i'd done pretty well, but jesus!! caviar, steak, some sort of pancake cake, fancy ham and i assume all washed down with champagne? i'm feeling pretty ashamed of my self. 

i'm going to have a sausage roll for tea on the train :(

 

 

 

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57 minutes ago, DavidM said:

Lovely . Ham n cheese is a great combo although pancakes is a new one but sounds nice

Thinking back on it, a cheese sauce poured over the stack would be an idea worth trying. As would, possibly, a chutney layer or two in the stack.

Anyhoo, it all started when my mum realised that you can make pancakes and freeze them in bagged batches to re-heat later. 

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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2 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

Thinking back on it, a cheese sauce poured over the stack would be an idea worth trying. As would, possibly, a chutney layer or two in the stack.

Anyhoo, it all started when my mum realised that you can make pancakes and freeze them in bagged batches to re-heat later. 

Home made pancakes wrapped around brown sugar with lemon juice drizzled on at  mine growing  up ,nice  but less adventurous !

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Just now, DavidM said:

Home made pancakes wrapped around brown sugar with lemon juice drizzled on at  mine growing  up ,nice  but less adventurous !

That's the standard sweet pancake combo for most Brits, and for good reason! The crunch and sweetness of sugar, added to the bite of the lemon juice is wonderful

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"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Just now, Robin Evans said:

Home done corned beef for tea.....

Bloody good it was..... 

Recipe?

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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34 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

Recipe?

 I get a piece of topside and soak it in a brine incl curing salts with nitrate (i get mine from weschenfelder) and leave in the fridge for 3-4 days min.

I rinse off and stud with cloves.

Mix up black and white pepper, all spice, cayenne, nutmeg and and a pinch cinamon. I massage the rub mix into the beef and leave overnight.

I then braise the beef in water with the usuals carrotts celery onions... 150°c for about 5-6 hours.

Lately I've done a stein on it by adding new pots and cabbage for the last 60/30 mins..... to give a one pot tea....

Old school snap. Very tasty. Make good sarnies tomorrow with a touch of mustard

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32 minutes ago, Robin Evans said:

 I get a piece of topside and soak it in a brine incl curing salts with nitrate (i get mine from weschenfelder) and leave in the fridge for 3-4 days min.

I rinse off and stud with cloves.

Mix up black and white pepper, all spice, cayenne, nutmeg and and a pinch cinamon. I massage the rub mix into the beef and leave overnight.

I then braise the beef in water with the usuals carrotts celery onions... 150°c for about 5-6 hours.

Lately I've done a stein on it by adding new pots and cabbage for the last 60/30 mins..... to give a one pot tea....

Old school snap. Very tasty. Make good sarnies tomorrow with a touch of mustard

I shall look into that, and maybe give it a go some time soon. Thanks especially for the recommendation for the nitrate supplier.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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I did slow-roasted beef last weekend. I used a remote-probe thermometer in the thickest part of a top-rump joint, to monitor temperature, and set the oven to 55 degrees centigrade. I held the temperature as long as, and as well as, my oven could manage. The joint was up on a rack, for even cooking all round, and only released a couple of drips into the roasting tin.

The beef came out extremely dark on the outside, but a deep red inside. Unlike a regular medium/rare roast, the juices did not spill out as you carved, but were retained in the meat. This does mean that, if you want gravy, you will have to make it without the roasting juices. But the beef was all the better for it.

I ate it at about 6:30pm, but kept coming back to it later in the evening for sneaky cold-cuts with a dab of horseradish. I'm almost ashamed how much I ate in one day.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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10 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

I did slow-roasted beef last weekend. I used a remote-probe thermometer in the thickest part of a top-rump joint, to monitor temperature, and set the oven to 55 degrees centigrade. I held the temperature as long as, and as well as, my oven could manage. The joint was up on a rack, for even cooking all round, and only released a couple of drips into the roasting tin.

The beef came out extremely dark on the outside, but a deep red inside. Unlike a regular medium/rare roast, the juices did not spill out as you carved, but were retained in the meat. This does mean that, if you want gravy, you will have to make it without the roasting juices. But the beef was all the better for it.

I ate it at about 6:30pm, but kept coming back to it later in the evening for sneaky cold-cuts with a dab of horseradish. I'm almost ashamed how much I ate in one day.

With beef , don’t be (almost) ashamed . One of God’s gifts!

Edited by DavidM
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9 minutes ago, DavidM said:

With beef , don’t be (almost) ashamed . One of God’s gifts!

I was following the astute dietary advice of Miss Piggy, who once wisely opined that she never ate anything she couldn't lift.

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"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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On the subject of beef, I just went up the road to Morrisons, and they have something new in the meat section - "Pastrami Style Brisket Joint". Priced at £10 a kilogramme, I bought a small joint for just under £5, which I will try tomorrow.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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On 18/05/2018 at 2:09 PM, Futtocks said:

On the subject of beef, I just went up the road to Morrisons, and they have something new in the meat section - "Pastrami Style Brisket Joint". Priced at £10 a kilogramme, I bought a small joint for just under £5, which I will try tomorrow.

Well, instead of following the printed instructions, I slow-cooked it inside a roasting bag, and it was pretty decent. No additional ingredients or seasoning added, which turned out to be a good move, as the meat had plenty of salt and pepper in the spice mix. Served with egg fried rice.

The downside to slow-cooking is that cold-cuts the next day are dryer than a conventional roast. Next time, I'll try the suggested method, for comparison.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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2 hours ago, Mumby Magic said:

4kg Frozen Goose for £5 reduce to clear at Tesco. Never had Goose before, but will be having within the next week.

Goose is delicious but oozes a lot of fat when roasted. Save that fat (and strain it as clear as you can through a fine sieve or muslin), because that'll be absolute dynamite for roast potatoes or chips. Or confit duck legs for Cassoulet.

Or rubbing on all over if you decide to swim the English Channel.

Edited by Futtocks

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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