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The Brexit Thread (incl Brexit Party)

Brexit: What should happen now?  

165 members have voted

  1. 1. Brexit: What should happen now?

    • Accept Theresa May's Brexit deal and just get it over and done with
      18
    • Reject Theresa May's Brexit deal and leave with 'No Deal' regardless of the consequences
      49
    • Reject Theresa May's Brexit deal and force a General Election
      12
    • Reject Theresa May's Brexit deal and have a second referendum with 'Remain' as an option
      56
    • Reject Theresa May's Brexit deal and have a second referendum without 'Remain' as an option
      7
    • Something completely different which I'll explain in detail below
      0
    • I have absolutely no idea and have now lost the will to live, just make this stop, for pity's sake
      23


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16 minutes ago, Bedford Roughyed said:

There are WTO implications regarding live animal exports... The RSPCA have questioned whether it will be legally possible to ban such trade under World Trade Organisation rules....

The paperwork will make it uneconomic other than for rare breed breeding animals

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1 hour ago, Steve May said:

It’s not just employment.   Language is barrier socially.   Although many - a long way from all - workplaces will be English speaking the rest of society is not.

If you are Polish and come to England, it’s hard to live well if you don’t speak English - but you probably do. 

If you are English and you go to Poland, it’s hard to live well if you don’t speak Polish - and you probably don’t. 

I have lived and worked in the USA, Belgium, Switzerland, Spain and Denmark. I have worked in Sweden, Finland, Germany, Norway and France. 

It is difficult. Most people say they would love to travel, a minority actually would and a smaller number would actually relish it. For most, it is tough. 

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"You clearly have never met Bob8 then, he's like a veritable Bryan Ferry of RL." - Johnoco 19 Jul 2014

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2 hours ago, Steve May said:

It’s not just employment.   Language is barrier socially.   Although many - a long way from all - workplaces will be English speaking the rest of society is not.

If you are English and you go to Poland, it’s hard to live well if you don’t speak Polish - and you probably don’t. 

right.... But it is not hard to live in Holland, Sweden, Norway, Ireland, Malta, Finland, Denmark, huge chunks of Spain etc etc.

Other nationalities value the ability to move around and experience different cultures. The biggest Norwegian community outside Norway... Is in the Valencia region. I very much doubt they all spoke Spanish prior to arriving. NE France is packed with the descendants of Italian immigrants. Luxembourg is 15% Portuguese. Germany has massive (working class!) Turkish immigration. The examples are countless.

British people have stated they don't want to be part of that. They don't want to integrate. 

It isn't an inability to 'speak the local language'... It is something else.

A lot of people think it is a superiority complex, based on their imperial past.

Others think it is a deep seated xenophobia or racism.

Edited by Celt
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2 hours ago, Saintslass said:

EU rules mean we cannot stop the transport of live animals for slaughter across Europe.

My fellow posters tell me we are a sovereign nation.  Yet we cannot even decide to stop the transport of live animals for slaughter.  Taking back control of our laws means we can stop the live transport of animals for slaughter.

 

Would be good to do something certainly.... As your pound will be so worthless that demand for exports should go up. As your country manufactures almost nothing then live animals COULD be a useful source of export revenue for you. Especially as you can probably raise them really cheaply being no longer subject to EU animal welfare regulations. 😄

Still i'm sure Farage has it all sorted out!!

😂


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49 minutes ago, Celt said:

right.... But it is not hard to live in Holland, Sweden, Norway, Ireland, Malta, Finland, Denmark, huge chunks of Spain etc etc.

Other nationalities value the ability to move around and experience different cultures. The biggest Norwegian community outside Norway... Is in the Valencia region. I very much doubt they all spoke Spanish prior to arriving. NE France is packed with the descendants of Italian immigrants. Luxembourg is 15% Portuguese. Germany has massive (working class!) Turkish immigration. The examples are countless.

British people have stated they don't want to be part of that. They don't want to integrate. 

It isn't an inability to 'speak the local language'... It is something else.

A lot of people think it is a superiority complex, based on their imperial past.

Others think it is a deep seated xenophobia or racism.

You've only got to visit places like Benidorm. There are British enclaves in Spain were Brits have lived for years and they still haven't got past " Hola " and " Por Favor ".

Edited by Tyrone Shoelaces

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1 hour ago, Celt said:

right.... But it is not hard to live in Holland, Sweden, Norway, Ireland, Malta, Finland, Denmark, huge chunks of Spain etc etc.

Other nationalities value the ability to move around and experience different cultures. The biggest Norwegian community outside Norway... Is in the Valencia region. I very much doubt they all spoke Spanish prior to arriving. NE France is packed with the descendants of Italian immigrants. Luxembourg is 15% Portuguese. Germany has massive (working class!) Turkish immigration. The examples are countless.

British people have stated they don't want to be part of that. They don't want to integrate. 

It isn't an inability to 'speak the local language'... It is something else.

A lot of people think it is a superiority complex, based on their imperial past.

Others think it is a deep seated xenophobia or racism.

How many countries have you lived and worked in?


"You clearly have never met Bob8 then, he's like a veritable Bryan Ferry of RL." - Johnoco 19 Jul 2014

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2 minutes ago, Bob8 said:

How many countries have you lived and worked in?

4


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On 27/05/2019 at 15:58, Bob8 said:

I know the answer from the other Brexiteers on this thread has been don’t know or that it is none of our business but I would like to pose a question to you too.  

Re your question (not quoted above as I mean to answer a different part of your post), the answer is:

Unless the EU prefers to put up barriers where none need to exist (we are talking, remember, about borders between two honourable, allied states, not about a need to deter hostile neighbours) the borders would look no different to the way they look today.

Any need to change is perceived, in my view - or rather, is being used - by the long-wet-lunch-hour-indulgent bunch of aging Eurocrats `at the top' in Brussels. 

 

Pertinent to the point I first intended to make with this posting, the above is but one of many clubs with which the Brussles hierarchy seem determined to beat (to death) the legitimate result of a legal and binding, countrywide, British referendum.

A result arrived at by counting the votes submitted by all legitimate, voting citizens who bothered to vote.  The preference of any citizen who had the right to vote but did not bother, by the way, whilst it may belatedly be important to the individual) is officially immaterial to the result of any vote, in any plebiscite the British public are called upon to cast their votes in.

Anyone who pretends to the least smidgen of respect for democracy knows that.

Similarly, anyone who calls for `another referendum' (in an attempt to overturn the result of a British referendum) is either unwittingly in error, or wilfully ignoring what a British referendum is.  I emphasise British referendum, because there are governing bodies in the world who may call referenda (or the like) and choose to ignore the result - if it is not to their liking.    (So why ask the question ???????????)    There is at least one member of the current Brussels ruling hierarchy, who thinks that an appropriate thing to do. 

Indeed, that member of the Brussels hierarchy at least once did it, and got away with it, so perhaps a referendum in Belgium is not binding.

Here it is.

 

All the above said, I should like once again to make a few simple things clear:

-   On the matter of the UK's leaving or remaining in the EU I am entirely indifferent.

-   As I see it, many things can be said for and against both, and neither would be a catastrophe.

-   I am not a `Brexiteer' ... what a loathsome bit of business-come-media-come-politico speak that is!.

 

 Having lived in two pseudo-democratic states (Franco's Spain and Mugabe's Zimbabwe) for a total of 27 years in all, I am an uncompromising supporter of the legitimate outcome of any plebiscite in any truly democratic state, no matter which party wins, or which option the majority of voters (who bothered to vote) choose.

Therefore, with the proviso that the law-makers themselves abide by the law, and can be seen to be working hard to do their best for the country (as they see it):

-   If Labour win an election I will live in peace and abide by the decisions made in Parliament.

-   If the Conservatives win an election I will live in peace and abide by the decisions made in Parliament.

-   If the Brexit party grows large enough to win an election, whilst I might be a little concerned, due to their inexperience I would, nevertheless, live in peace and abide by the decisions made in Parliament.

 

I am a supporter of the democratically sought, ascertained and accepted majority public opinion, as determined by referendum on 23:06:16, on the questions should Britain leave the European Union or should Britain remain in the European Union.

The majority voted to leave.  I support that.  So should everybody who dares to say they believe in democracy.

As to changing a decision that many did not want:

While not at liberty to change, unreasonably delay or alter the legitimate outcome of any referendum in a truly democratic country, or to hinder its implementation, those who disliked that choice and wish to see it overturned are entirely at liberty to call for another referendum (thereafter), asking the voting public whether Britain should seek to re-enter the European Union or to remain outside it, as a fully self-governing, neighbouring state and ally.

Edited by Honor James
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“The purpose of life is to live it, to taste experience to the utmost, to reach out eagerly and without fear for newer and richer experience.”  Eleanor Roosevelt

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13 minutes ago, Honor James said:

the legitimate result of a legal and binding, countrywide, British referendum.

???? I think you meant non-binding 

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11 minutes ago, Honor James said:

Re your question (not quoted above as I mean to answer a different part of your post), the answer is:

Unless the EU prefers to put up barriers where none need to exist (we are talking, remember, about borders between two honourable, allied states, not about a need to deter hostile neighbours) the borders would look no different to the way they look today.

Are you for real ?

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1 minute ago, Wholly Trinity said:

???? I think you meant non-binding 

Not to mention that the side that won have been shown to have repeatedly broken election rules. 

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21 minutes ago, Honor James said:

Re your question (not quoted above as I mean to answer a different part of your post), the answer is

Any need to change is perceived, in my view - or rather, is being used - by the long-wet-lunch-hour-indulgent bunch of aging Eurocrats `at the top' in Brussels. 

 

Pertinent to the point I first intended to make with this posting, the above is but one of many clubs with which the Brussles hierarchy seem determined to beat (to death) the legitimate result of a legal and binding, countrywide, British referendum.

A result arrived at by counting the votes submitted by all legitimate, voting citizens who bothered to vote.  The preference of any citizen who had the right to vote but did not bother, by the way, whilst it may belatedly be important to the individual) is officially immaterial to the result of any vote, in any plebiscite the British public are called upon to cast their votes in.

Anyone who pretends to the least smidgen of respect for democracy knows that.

Similarly, anyone who calls for `another referendum' (in an attempt to overturn the result of a British referendum) is either unwittingly in error, or wilfully ignoring what a British referendum is.  I emphasise British referendum, because there are governing bodies in the world who may call referenda (or the like) and choose to ignore the result - if it is not to their liking.    (So why ask the question ???????????)    There is at least one member of the current Brussels ruling hierarchy, who thinks that an appropriate thing to do. 

Indeed, that member of the Brussels hierarchy at least once did it, and got away with it, so perhaps a referendum in Belgium is not binding.

Here it is.

 

All the above said, I should like once again to make a few simple things clear:

-   On the matter of the UK's leaving or remaining in the EU I am entirely indifferent.

-   As I see it, many things can be said for and against both, and neither would be a catastrophe.

-   I am not a `Brexiteer' ... what a loathsome bit of business-come-media-come-politico speak that is!.

 

 Having lived in two pseudo-democratic states (Franco's Spain and Mugabe's Zimbabwe) for a total of 27 years in all, I am an uncompromising supporter of the legitimate outcome of any plebiscite in any truly democratic state, no matter which party wins, or which option the majority of voters (who bothered to vote) choose.

Therefore, with the proviso that the law-makers themselves abide by the law, and can be seen to be working hard to do their best for the country (as they see it):

-   If Labour win an election I will live in peace and abide by the decisions made in Parliament.

-   If the Conservatives win an election I will live in peace and abide by the decisions made in Parliament.

-   If the Brexit party grows large enough to win an election, whilst I might be a little concerned, due to their inexperience I would, nevertheless, live in peace and abide by the decisions made in Parliament.

 

I am a supporter of the democratically sought, ascertained and accepted majority public opinion, as determined by referendum on 23:06:16, on the questions should Britain leave the European Union or should Britain remain in the European Union.

The majority voted to leave.  I support that.  So should everybody who dares to say they believe in democracy.

As to changing a decision that many did not want:

While not at liberty to change, unreasonably delay or alter the legitimate outcome of any referendum in a truly democratic country, or to hinder its implementation, those who disliked that choice and wish to see it overturned are entirely at liberty to call for another referendum (thereafter), asking the voting public whether Britain should seek to re-enter the European Union or to remain outside it, as a fully self-governing, neighbouring state and ally.

Despite your protestations you show little understanding of the function of a border, the operation of the EU or indeed democracy.

23 minutes ago, Honor James said:

Unless the EU prefers to put up barriers where none need to exist (we are talking, remember, about borders between two honourable, allied states, not about a need to deter hostile neighbours) the borders would look no different to the way they look today.

Once we are out of the EU we will have a different regulatory and financial framework operating in the UK from the rest of the world. There will need to be a means of identifying items that require testing for conformance with our regulations and whether a tariff of any type needs to be applied, you may say we will go for free trade with zero tariffs but you will obliterate UK farming and manufacturing on that basis. Note also that we can't under WTO rules apply zero tariff trade to one country without applying it to all countries. We are often told by many of the Quitters (is that better than Brexiters?) that all 17.4 million of them voted to "take back control" of our country, borders, laws and immigration policy. (apologies if I've missed any). If "taking back control" of our border means opening them up to all with no checks then I have to ask what control you have taken. Border will have to look different or they won't be borders. I'm looking particularly at the Irish / Northern Ireland border. That one that up to 21,000 heavily armed air mobile troops couldn't secure last time it was an actual border.

Moving on...

Democracy is a process, it is a political system under which we live, it allows us to believe a lot of things and campaign for a lot of things, for example reversing a democratically taken vote to join a trading organisation or to campaign to change a decision before it's implemented. It is not a snapshot one off event and the suggestion it is dependent on implementing a poorly worded non binding vote designed to save the Conservative party from splitting is frankly ludicrous.

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43 minutes ago, Honor James said:

Re your question (not quoted above as I mean to answer a different part of your post), the answer is:

Unless the EU prefers to put up barriers where none need to exist (we are talking, remember, about borders between two honourable, allied states, not about a need to deter hostile neighbours) the borders would look no different to the way they look today.

Any need to change is perceived, in my view - or rather, is being used - by the long-wet-lunch-hour-indulgent bunch of aging Eurocrats `at the top' in Brussels. 

 

Pertinent to the point I first intended to make with this posting, the above is but one of many clubs with which the Brussles hierarchy seem determined to beat (to death) the legitimate result of a legal and binding, countrywide, British referendum.

A result arrived at by counting the votes submitted by all legitimate, voting citizens who bothered to vote.  The preference of any citizen who had the right to vote but did not bother, by the way, whilst it may belatedly be important to the individual) is officially immaterial to the result of any vote, in any plebiscite the British public are called upon to cast their votes in.

Anyone who pretends to the least smidgen of respect for democracy knows that.

Similarly, anyone who calls for `another referendum' (in an attempt to overturn the result of a British referendum) is either unwittingly in error, or wilfully ignoring what a British referendum is.  I emphasise British referendum, because there are governing bodies in the world who may call referenda (or the like) and choose to ignore the result - if it is not to their liking.    (So why ask the question ???????????)    There is at least one member of the current Brussels ruling hierarchy, who thinks that an appropriate thing to do. 

Indeed, that member of the Brussels hierarchy at least once did it, and got away with it, so perhaps a referendum in Belgium is not binding.

Here it is.

 

All the above said, I should like once again to make a few simple things clear:

-   On the matter of the UK's leaving or remaining in the EU I am entirely indifferent.

-   As I see it, many things can be said for and against both, and neither would be a catastrophe.

-   I am not a `Brexiteer' ... what a loathsome bit of business-come-media-come-politico speak that is!.

 

 Having lived in two pseudo-democratic states (Franco's Spain and Mugabe's Zimbabwe) for a total of 27 years in all, I am an uncompromising supporter of the legitimate outcome of any plebiscite in any truly democratic state, no matter which party wins, or which option the majority of voters (who bothered to vote) choose.

Therefore, with the proviso that the law-makers themselves abide by the law, and can be seen to be working hard to do their best for the country (as they see it):

-   If Labour win an election I will live in peace and abide by the decisions made in Parliament.

-   If the Conservatives win an election I will live in peace and abide by the decisions made in Parliament.

-   If the Brexit party grows large enough to win an election, whilst I might be a little concerned, due to their inexperience I would, nevertheless, live in peace and abide by the decisions made in Parliament.

 

I am a supporter of the democratically sought, ascertained and accepted majority public opinion, as determined by referendum on 23:06:16, on the questions should Britain leave the European Union or should Britain remain in the European Union.

The majority voted to leave.  I support that.  So should everybody who dares to say they believe in democracy.

As to changing a decision that many did not want:

While not at liberty to change, unreasonably delay or alter the legitimate outcome of any referendum in a truly democratic country, or to hinder its implementation, those who disliked that choice and wish to see it overturned are entirely at liberty to call for another referendum (thereafter), asking the voting public whether Britain should seek to re-enter the European Union or to remain outside it, as a fully self-governing, neighbouring state and ally.

I beg your pardon, if you are not pushing for leaving the EU, then you indeed have no onus to answer the question. 

That the Leave option was not defined was the fault of a Remain administration. 

We are both in the moderate third. The strength of democracy is not that it gives the right answers, but that those in power are answerable and their decisions have credibility. I was disappointed in the result of the referendum but accepted the result. 

If we are to leave the EU, I was happy to accept that. I also accept reality, we are still going to have to pay for the administration of the single market (still cheaper than duplicating all the red tape), and lose our huge influence in one of the world’s biggest trading blocks. 

But reality and democracy were clear. 

Two block arose that reject those. Brexiteers who were determined to change the result by pretending the vote was on the single market entirely and whatever else they did not want. 

The second block were Remainers who simply did not accept the result as valid. Rules were broken, but unless you are able to persuade a large chunk of Leavers that they were credulous, the accepted mandate is to Leave. 

So, Remain carried on, immediately demanding a second referendum. May pushed the mandate of the referendum even further.  But, she leads a democratically elected Government so fair enough. 

The WA agreement is voted down by extremists in the ERG though. The extremists then claim that cutting all ties is the only approach acceptable. This is a snub to democracy and give the Remainers who refused to accept the result more credibility. The two wings that do not like the result out number the third in the middle and we find ourselves in this mess. 

The ERG should have accepted Brexit, then moved onto campaigns to leave the single market and customs union. Instead, they are dragging things out so long that they are starting to wear a hole is the mandate that there is from the referendum. 

Edited by Bob8
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1 hour ago, Celt said:

4

Were that true, you should be better informed. 

Most countries in the EU will give short term residency only. After that, you typically require someone willing to claim you as a partner or find suitable employment. Even the first step of finding accommodation can be challenging. Finding a job against others who speak the local language fluently is difficult, and undercutting the locals is not always possible, legally or practically (you may have to find a family either with you or back home). 

There is a reason those Norwegians are in a colony. 

Some would jump at the chance, I would. But, most people do not unless forced to. 


"You clearly have never met Bob8 then, he's like a veritable Bryan Ferry of RL." - Johnoco 19 Jul 2014

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59 minutes ago, Honor James said:

Unless the EU prefers to put up barriers where none need to exist (we are talking, remember, about borders between two honourable, allied states, not about a need to deter hostile neighbours) the borders would look no different to the way they look today.

A very persuasive argument for the single market and customs union. 

It is the British government that wishes to leave the single market and customs union.    

Be under no illusion, a hard Brexit will not be pretty for anyone.   Once the UK steps out of the customs union it can certainly choose to leave the border with Ireland open.    But the WTO rules that Brexiters are so fond of are very clear - it would have to open its borders in exactly the same way to the entire world.  And the same is true for the EU.

The EU is big enough and powerful enough to go toe to toe in an argument over this with the US and China, although it won’t be pretty.   Expect decades of legal challenges.

But the UK will be negotiating new trade agreements from scratch with every country and trading block in the world.   And if it doesn’t close the Irish border, it will be doing so having already removed every single tariff and trade barrier it could use as leverage.  How will they negotiate any free trade deal when they’ve already given away tariff free access to the entire world?   Who will bother to negotiate?   Why would they need to?

 

 

 


English, Irish, Brit, Yorkshire, European.  Citizen of the People's Republic of Yorkshire, the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the European Union.  Critical of all it.  Proud of all it.    

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17 hours ago, 17 stone giant said:

Pfft, Claire Fox is a nobody. I can top that easily. I live in the South East and I voted Brexit Party, so I voted for Nigel Farage. 💙

To be fair to Farage, compared to Claire Fox he’s quite a nice bloke.  


English, Irish, Brit, Yorkshire, European.  Citizen of the People's Republic of Yorkshire, the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the European Union.  Critical of all it.  Proud of all it.    

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5 hours ago, Celt said:

right.... But it is not hard to live in Holland, Sweden, Norway, Ireland, Malta, Finland, Denmark, huge chunks of Spain etc etc.

Other nationalities value the ability to move around and experience different cultures. The biggest Norwegian community outside Norway... Is in the Valencia region. I very much doubt they all spoke Spanish prior to arriving. NE France is packed with the descendants of Italian immigrants. Luxembourg is 15% Portuguese. Germany has massive (working class!) Turkish immigration. The examples are countless.

British people have stated they don't want to be part of that. They don't want to integrate. 

It isn't an inability to 'speak the local language'... It is something else.

A lot of people think it is a superiority complex, based on their imperial past.

Others think it is a deep seated xenophobia or racism.

There are about 1.3 million British citizens living in EU countries outside the UK.

Only Poland, Romania, Germany and Italy have more citizens living in other EU countries. 

If your point is that the British are uniquely xenophobic and don’t therefore take advantage of the opportunities provided by the EU to work freely across Europe then I’m not sure the data supports you. 

 

Worth adding that those 1.3 million had rather a lot of skin in the game when it came to the Brexit referendum and were disgracefully denied a vote in it.

Edited by Steve May

English, Irish, Brit, Yorkshire, European.  Citizen of the People's Republic of Yorkshire, the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the European Union.  Critical of all it.  Proud of all it.    

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8 hours ago, Saintslass said:

EU rules mean we cannot stop the transport of live animals for slaughter across Europe.

My fellow posters tell me we are a sovereign nation.  Yet we cannot even decide to stop the transport of live animals for slaughter.  Taking back control of our laws means we can stop the live transport of animals for slaughter. 

 

It's been fact checked to death but when will Brexiteers ever learn with their simplistic guff about "sovereignty":

We are part of the EU. We set the rules. It is not an evil empire imposing stuff on us, we're sat around the table and get a significantly disproportionate say in how our mutually-beneficial trading arrangements work. Unlike, say, the WTO.

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3 hours ago, Pen-Y-Bont Crusader said:

Are you for real ? 

Someone else who "can't be bothered" finding out what it is they're voting for?

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6 hours ago, Bob8 said:

I have lived and worked in the USA, Belgium, Switzerland, Spain and Denmark. I have worked in Sweden, Finland, Germany, Norway and France. 

It is difficult. Most people say they would love to travel, a minority actually would and a smaller number would actually relish it. For most, it is tough. 

I have a lot of respect for people who do it.  One of my oldest friends worked in Mozambique for nearly ten years, another lived in Japan for a few years, others are in Canada, Germany, Denmark, Australia and the USA

I have worked in a lot of countries , in and out of the EU, but mostly on a “fly out Monday morning, fly back Friday night” basis.  

The only countries I’ve stayed long enough in to plausibly claim I’ve lived there are South Africa and Australia.   Australia in particular is a very easy country for a Brit.

I had started down the path of leaving the UK for a few years in my twenties, but a life threatening illness put the kibosh on it before I got very far.  Now, with the kids (esp one with special needs) I think the only place I might ever live outside the U.K. is Ireland. 

Which is all okay by me.   Yorkshire is a pretty decent place to live a good life.

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English, Irish, Brit, Yorkshire, European.  Citizen of the People's Republic of Yorkshire, the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the European Union.  Critical of all it.  Proud of all it.    

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49 minutes ago, Steve May said:

There are about 1.3 million British citizens living in EU countries outside the UK.

Only Poland, Romania, Germany and Italy have more citizens living in other EU countries. 

If your point is that the British are uniquely xenophobic and don’t therefore take advantage of the opportunities provided by the EU to work freely across Europe then I’m not sure the data supports you. 

 

Worth adding that those 1.3 million had rather a lot of skin in the game when it came to the Brexit referendum and were disgracefully denied a vote in it.

As one of the 1.3 million, can I just point out that I, and my wife, voted 'Remain' in the referendum. If you were previously on the electoral register in the UK within the last 15 years, all you had to do was register and you could vote, either by postal vote or by proxy.

Voting in the recent European Parliament elections was problematic due to the short notice. My own ballot paper only arrived about 60 hours before the deadline (midday Tuesday). I posted it on Wednesday morning and don't know if it got there in time.

Slightly off-topic now, but with regards to language learning, in my experience, the crucial factor is motivation. I know several English people who live here and are fluent in this bloody difficult language. Why? Because they have children who speak Greek or they work with Greeks. For myself, I speak passable Greek, but I don't need to speak better Greek. I can get by. Ten years ago, the government changed the rules so I had to get a Greek teaching licence. To get that, I needed a Greek language certificate. After a one-month intensive course at the University of Crete, I got the certificate and eventually got my Greek teaching licence. Motivation!

Brits don't need to learn foreign languages because, wherever you go on Earth, you will find someone eager to show you how good their English is. No motivation!

Edited by tonyXIII
To correct grammatical errors
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23 minutes ago, tonyXIII said:

As one of the 1.3 million, can I just point out that I, and my wife, voted 'Remain' in the referendum. If you were previously on the electoral register in the UK within the last 15 years, all you had to do was register and you could vote, either by postal vote or by proxy

Good correction.   Thanks for calling it out. 

I think you’re right about motivation in learning languages btw.   

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English, Irish, Brit, Yorkshire, European.  Citizen of the People's Republic of Yorkshire, the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the European Union.  Critical of all it.  Proud of all it.    

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8 hours ago, Celt said:

Would be good to do something certainly.... As your pound will be so worthless that demand for exports should go up. As your country manufactures almost nothing then live animals COULD be a useful source of export revenue for you. Especially as you can probably raise them really cheaply being no longer subject to EU animal welfare regulations. 😄

Still i'm sure Farage has it all sorted out!!

😂

Our exports already hit highest on record levels during the last year so some companies will be having a very happy time of things at present.

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2 hours ago, M j M said:

It's been fact checked to death but when will Brexiteers ever learn with their simplistic guff about "sovereignty":

We are part of the EU. We set the rules. It is not an evil empire imposing stuff on us, we're sat around the table and get a significantly disproportionate say in how our mutually-beneficial trading arrangements work. Unlike, say, the WTO.

Er, you are wrong here.  We don't have a 'significantly disproportionate say ...'; we have a say based on the size of our population and given that we are one of 28, that isn't much of a say.  And where we have rules and the EU have rules, both on the same issue, EU rules trump our rules.  That's the Treaty, not me making stuff up.  EU rules are supreme over UK rules where the two clash.  Therefore, we do NOT set the rules.  We set SOME rules.  I don't want ANY of our rules to be subservient to the EU.

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