Jump to content
Leeds Wire

Butchering the English language

Recommended Posts

With me it`s usually Americanisms The use of the word awesome for just about anything . People who say good good when one good is quite enough , And those that say "laters " and call each other dude .....and don`t get me started on high fives . 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, fatboystu said:

People who say axe instead of ask......i want to axe a question 😡😡😡😡

Outside of Mobile Alabama, where does axe fall?


Learn to listen without distortion and learn to look without imagination.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Bearman said:

Upward inflection on a statement rather than a question.

I have no idea what that means but I’m gonna nod sagely and say I agree 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Wiltshire Rhino said:

It's an Aussie thing

It's a Canadian thing. Well that's what I heard many years ago.

Better ask Kayakman.


Learn to listen without distortion and learn to look without imagination.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Wiltshire Rhino said:

It's an Aussie thing

Ah ok , in that case I absolutely hate it . Shocking 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Mister Ting said:

It's a Canadian thing. Well that's what I heard many years ago.

Better ask Kayakman.

It became more common over here when the youth of this country started watching Neighbours and Home & Away. 


2014 Challenged Cup Winner

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, southwalesrabbitoh said:

Get rid of 'e' then. 

There is an 'e' in the number 'one' .

It is pronounced "wonn' or do you say ""woan"?

Edited by Bearman

Ron Banks

Bears and Barrow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Wiltshire Rhino said:

It became more common over here when the youth of this country started watching Neighbours and Home & Away. 

You could be correct.

However, I know certain people born between 1982 and 1992 don't use it; however, someone born in 1993 does.


Learn to listen without distortion and learn to look without imagination.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an estuary accent unless visiting wider family when we all seem to switch to cockney.  I think we have more glottal stops and add in unnecessary Rs so "I don't known when we last saw each other" would become "sorr each other" and "not a good idea is it?" becomes "idear is it?".  Hs are dropped so we have "Ave you seen er?" as is L so milk becomes miwk, syllables are also dropped so January is Januree and library is libree.  R is also thrown aside so "park the car" becomes "pahk the cah".  All just laziness really.


That dawning realisation that politicians are worse than the Mafia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

its  LIKE so LIKE and LIKE 

  • Haha 1

the grass may be greener on the other side of the fence but the crows are just as black

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

F instead of th .... strenf and fursday.  But as with all dialects , everyone’s got their own peculiarities and speech patterns . And what a great British trait it is ! But it’s always good to gently mock and question people who do and say things differently to you  , and have zero self awareness .... another great British trait! 

Edited by DavidM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, graveyard johnny said:

its  LIKE so LIKE and LIKE 

You mean 'like' graveyard johnny?😁


Learn to listen without distortion and learn to look without imagination.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, southwalesrabbitoh said:

It's pronounced wun, and should be written as wun.  

No. It's pronounced as wonn and written as one. 

Rhymes with Wonn and sconn.

I have never seen the number one with the spelling as wun. Perhaps you could point out a link to a dictionary that shows the spelling of wun  instead of one.

 

 


Ron Banks

Bears and Barrow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Tumeric" instead of "turmeric". I realise neither are actually English words, but if we can't bring back the birch for this, then the Empire's gone to the dogs, damn it!

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Bearman said:

No. It's pronounced as wonn and written as one. 

Rhymes with Wonn and sconn.

I have never seen the number one with the spelling as wun. Perhaps you could point out a link to a dictionary that shows the spelling of wun  instead of one.

 

 

 

2 hours ago, southwalesrabbitoh said:

It's pronounced wun, and should be written as wun.  

Here is my link

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/pronunciation/english/scone

If you click on the link and listen to the US pronunciation I refer you to the title of this thread title

 " Butchering the ENGLISH language"

Edited by Bearman

Ron Banks

Bears and Barrow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...