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sweaty craiq

Free Covid Testing

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It’s the government (taxpayers) that will be paying for these tests, they are not free. The guy (company) running this testing site are clearly not running it as they should be. People are only supposed to be tested if they have symptoms or been in close contact with someone who has tested positive. I’m sure he appreciates Duffy quoting him in the press and it getting passed on to the department of health. 

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And when the players and staff from Oldham, Rochdale H, Widnes, Oldham Athletic, Bolton W, Blackburn Rovers etc (or even Leigh) start turning up twice a week? 

Edited by Les Tonks Sidestep
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14 minutes ago, Les Tonks Sidestep said:

And when the players and staff from Oldham, Rochdale H, Widnes, Oldham Athletic, Bolton W, Blackburn Rovers etc (or even Leigh) start turning up twice a week? 

As I said in another thread last week, John Duffy got the initiative or idea from Fev, as he had been in discussion with the Fev hierarchy who informed him that they had secured free testing in their area. 

Do add in all the West Yorkshire pro sports organisations to your discussion point.

Edited by Harry Stottle

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I suspect there may be some disappointment (from NHS website)

Anyone who has symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) can get a free test to check if they have the virus. Some people without symptoms can have the test too.

Who can get a test

You can get a test:

for yourself, if you have coronavirus symptoms now (a high temperature, a new, continuous cough, or a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste)

for someone you live with, if they have coronavirus symptoms

for yourself, if you have been told to have a test before you go into hospital, for example, for surgery

for yourself, if you live in Leicester, where there is a coronavirus outbreak

You can get 1 test for each person with symptoms or one for yourself if your hospital tells you that you need it.

And you can't just walk up

There are 2 ways of getting a test. You can:

book an appointment at a drive-through or walk-through test site

ask for a home test kit – this will be delivered to your home

If you get a home test kit, you will need to do the test and return the kit in the next 48 hours. You will be told how to do this.

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5 minutes ago, Les Tonks Sidestep said:

I suspect there may be some disappointment (from NHS website)

Anyone who has symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) can get a free test to check if they have the virus. Some people without symptoms can have the test too.

Who can get a test

You can get a test:

for yourself, if you have coronavirus symptoms now (a high temperature, a new, continuous cough, or a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste)

for someone you live with, if they have coronavirus symptoms

for yourself, if you have been told to have a test before you go into hospital, for example, for surgery

for yourself, if you live in Leicester, where there is a coronavirus outbreak

You can get 1 test for each person with symptoms or one for yourself if your hospital tells you that you need it.

And you can't just walk up

There are 2 ways of getting a test. You can:

book an appointment at a drive-through or walk-through test site

ask for a home test kit – this will be delivered to your home

If you get a home test kit, you will need to do the test and return the kit in the next 48 hours. You will be told how to do this.

I imagine there’s very different rules for sportsmen. 

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4 minutes ago, Hela Wigmen said:

I imagine there’s very different rules for sportsmen. 

Really? No mention of sports folk here:

List of essential workers and those prioritised for testing (England only)

  • all NHS and social care staff, including:
  • doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics, social workers, care workers, and other frontline health and social care staff, including volunteers and unpaid carers
  • the support and specialist staff required to maintain the UK’s health and social care sector
  • those working as part of the health and social care supply chain, including producers and distributors of medicines, and medical and personal protective equipment
  • NHS Blood and Transplant frontline staff (blood donation staff, specialist nurses for organ donation, staff running therapeutic apheresis services in NHS hospitals)
  • those providing ancillary support to NHS workers (such as hotel accommodation for NHS staff)
  • personal care assistants
  • essential public services staff, including:
  • prisons, probation, courts and tribunals staff, judiciary
  • religious staff
  • charities and workers delivering critical frontline services
  • those responsible for the management of the deceased
  • journalists and broadcasters covering coronavirus or providing public service broadcasting
  • public health and environmental staff, such as specialist community public health nursing
  • public safety and national security staff, including:
  • police and support staff
  • Ministry of Defence civilians, contractors and armed forces personnel (those critical to the delivery of critical defence and national security outputs and critical to the response to the coronavirus pandemic), including defence medical staff
  • fire and rescue service employees (including support staff),
  • National Crime Agency staff, those maintaining border security, prison and probation staff and other national security roles, including those overseas
  • British Transport Police and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency
  • transport workers, including:
  • those who keep the air, water, road and rail passenger and freight transport modes operating during the coronavirus response
  • those working on transport systems through which supply chains pass
  • education and childcare workers, including:
  • support and teaching staff
  • social workers
  • specialist education professionals
  • critical personnel in the production and distribution of food, drink and essential goods, including:
  • those involved in food production, processing, distribution, sale and delivery
  • those critical to the provision of other essential goods, such as medical supply chain and distribution workers, including community pharmacy and testing (such as PHE labs), and veterinary medicine
  • workers critical to the continuity of essential movement of goods
  • local and national government staff critical to the effective delivery of the coronavirus response, or delivering essential public services, such as the payment of benefits
  • public and environmental health staff, including in government agencies and arm’s length bodies
  • funeral industry workers
  • frontline local authority staff and volunteers, including
  • those working with vulnerable children and adults, victims of domestic abuse, and the homeless and rough sleepers (and hotel staff supporting these groups)
  • voluntary sector organisations providing substance misuse treatment
  • utilities, communication and financial services staff, including:
  • staff needed for essential financial services provision (including but not limited to workers in banks, building societies and financial market infrastructure)
  • the oil, gas, electricity and water sectors (including sewerage)
  • information technology and data infrastructure sector and primary industry supplies to continue during the coronavirus response
  • essential staff working in the civil nuclear, chemicals, telecommunications (including but not limited to network operations, field engineering, call centre staff, IT and data infrastructure, 999 and 111 essential services), postal services and delivery, payments providers and waste disposal sectors

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Just now, Les Tonks Sidestep said:

Really? No mention of sports folk here:

List of essential workers and those prioritised for testing (England only)

  • all NHS and social care staff, including:
  • doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics, social workers, care workers, and other frontline health and social care staff, including volunteers and unpaid carers
  • the support and specialist staff required to maintain the UK’s health and social care sector
  • those working as part of the health and social care supply chain, including producers and distributors of medicines, and medical and personal protective equipment
  • NHS Blood and Transplant frontline staff (blood donation staff, specialist nurses for organ donation, staff running therapeutic apheresis services in NHS hospitals)
  • those providing ancillary support to NHS workers (such as hotel accommodation for NHS staff)
  • personal care assistants
  • essential public services staff, including:
  • prisons, probation, courts and tribunals staff, judiciary
  • religious staff
  • charities and workers delivering critical frontline services
  • those responsible for the management of the deceased
  • journalists and broadcasters covering coronavirus or providing public service broadcasting
  • public health and environmental staff, such as specialist community public health nursing
  • public safety and national security staff, including:
  • police and support staff
  • Ministry of Defence civilians, contractors and armed forces personnel (those critical to the delivery of critical defence and national security outputs and critical to the response to the coronavirus pandemic), including defence medical staff
  • fire and rescue service employees (including support staff),
  • National Crime Agency staff, those maintaining border security, prison and probation staff and other national security roles, including those overseas
  • British Transport Police and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency
  • transport workers, including:
  • those who keep the air, water, road and rail passenger and freight transport modes operating during the coronavirus response
  • those working on transport systems through which supply chains pass
  • education and childcare workers, including:
  • support and teaching staff
  • social workers
  • specialist education professionals
  • critical personnel in the production and distribution of food, drink and essential goods, including:
  • those involved in food production, processing, distribution, sale and delivery
  • those critical to the provision of other essential goods, such as medical supply chain and distribution workers, including community pharmacy and testing (such as PHE labs), and veterinary medicine
  • workers critical to the continuity of essential movement of goods
  • local and national government staff critical to the effective delivery of the coronavirus response, or delivering essential public services, such as the payment of benefits
  • public and environmental health staff, including in government agencies and arm’s length bodies
  • funeral industry workers
  • frontline local authority staff and volunteers, including
  • those working with vulnerable children and adults, victims of domestic abuse, and the homeless and rough sleepers (and hotel staff supporting these groups)
  • voluntary sector organisations providing substance misuse treatment
  • utilities, communication and financial services staff, including:
  • staff needed for essential financial services provision (including but not limited to workers in banks, building societies and financial market infrastructure)
  • the oil, gas, electricity and water sectors (including sewerage)
  • information technology and data infrastructure sector and primary industry supplies to continue during the coronavirus response
  • essential staff working in the civil nuclear, chemicals, telecommunications (including but not limited to network operations, field engineering, call centre staff, IT and data infrastructure, 999 and 111 essential services), postal services and delivery, payments providers and waste disposal sectors

Considering that sports clubs are buying their own tests and not going via NHS or whoever, I’d imagine none of that applies to them. 

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2 hours ago, Hela Wigmen said:

Considering that sports clubs are buying their own tests and not going via NHS or whoever, I’d imagine none of that applies to them. 

Not at Leigh. They’ve clearly stated they intend to use tests meant for NHS staff and people with symptoms paid for by taxpayers.

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6 hours ago, Hela Wigmen said:

I imagine there’s very different rules for sportsmen. 

Yes.  Like they're not free.

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"We'll sell you a seat .... but you'll only need the edge of it!"

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10 hours ago, Hela Wigmen said:

Considering that sports clubs are buying their own tests and not going via NHS or whoever, I’d imagine none of that applies to them. 

Have you read the original post?

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12 hours ago, Skids said:

Have you read the original post?

Well, it's nice for Leigh.

Who are they going to play ?


"We'll sell you a seat .... but you'll only need the edge of it!"

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19 hours ago, Sir Kevin Sinfield said:

Not at Leigh. They’ve clearly stated they intend to use tests meant for NHS staff and people with symptoms paid for by taxpayers.

You really are commercially clueless and jumping on the depriving our great NHS of testing is low even by your standards, but typical for some RL fans.

Testing is a virtual fixed cost process, we have 300k daily capacity but are only using 100k, no great cost to serve No depriving NHS staff of tests and by taking 200+ players off furlough a saving to the tax payer of £100k per week

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1 hour ago, sweaty craiq said:

You really are commercially clueless and jumping on the depriving our great NHS of testing is low even by your standards, but typical for some RL fans.

Testing is a virtual fixed cost process, we have 300k daily capacity but are only using 100k, no great cost to serve No depriving NHS staff of tests and by taking 200+ players off furlough a saving to the tax payer of £100k per week

Not true. The government pay for the tests, not the testing capacity. If those tests are used that day, they can be used another day.

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1 hour ago, DoubleD said:

Not true. The government pay for the tests, not the testing capacity. If those tests are used that day, they can be used another day.

That's true but you've  got to ask yourself is it better to get players off furlough and when that ends benefits to save taxpayer money or leave tests in a drawer for a rainy day

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2 minutes ago, POR said:

That's true but you've  got to ask yourself is it better to get players off furlough and when that ends benefits to save taxpayer money or leave tests in a drawer for a rainy day

The point is though that those tests will be used and still cost the taxpayers money.

Your point on the furlough is a valid one, but forms part of the wider discussion on the pro/cons of re-starting League 1 and Championship

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3 hours ago, Griff said:

Well, it's nice for Leigh.

Who are they going to play ?

GhostBusters! 👻 

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31 minutes ago, DoubleD said:

The point is though that those tests will be used and still cost the taxpayers money.

Your point on the furlough is a valid one, but forms part of the wider discussion on the pro/cons of re-starting League 1 and Championship

What does the government say? Is not in their interest to weigh the Pros/Cons. 

One option to me shows them saving money, yet still getting people tested.

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4 hours ago, sweaty craiq said:

You really are commercially clueless and jumping on the depriving our great NHS of testing is low even by your standards, but typical for some RL fans.

Testing is a virtual fixed cost process, we have 300k daily capacity but are only using 100k, no great cost to serve No depriving NHS staff of tests and by taking 200+ players off furlough a saving to the tax payer of £100k per week

If we do have thousands of spare tests daily there are a lot of key workers they should go to before they are given to Leigh’s players and staff.

As my wife is a key worker and spent time in a room with someone who tested positive that day, but was told not to book a test unless you develop symptoms as these were the instructions from PHE, I don’t believe we do have thousands of spare paid for tests.

If the government come out and say we will test sportsmen and women for free, fair enough, but until that point Leigh shouldn’t be using free tax payer funded testing sites. 

Edited by Sir Kevin Sinfield
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Interesting news coming  out of southampton running a four week test for covid using saliva instead of swabs only takes 20 minutes rather than 12 hours to check if trials successful going to give all the people of southampton  some quarter of a million weekly tests and according to the so called scientists it has the potential to be run out all over the country in a very large scale at multiple locations

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1 hour ago, POR said:

Interesting news coming  out of southampton running a four week test for covid using saliva instead of swabs only takes 20 minutes rather than 12 hours to check if trials successful going to give all the people of southampton  some quarter of a million weekly tests and according to the so called scientists it has the potential to be run out all over the country in a very large scale at multiple locations

Do you think they are pretend scientists then?

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1 minute ago, distantdog said:

Do you think they are pretend scientists then?

well as an island they did not close the borders in march and allowed 3000 from a covid hotspot in spain a town that was under lockdown attend a football match with me then it sometimes makes me wonder if they are

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2 minutes ago, POR said:

well as an island they did not close the borders in march and allowed 3000 from a covid hotspot in spain a town that was under lockdown attend a football match with me then it sometimes makes me wonder if they are

As B Johnson esq said, the decisions are ultimately made by the politicians. I don't want to derail this thread as there is a perfectly interesting one on another part of the forum. I will say that the so called scientists suggested a lockdown a week before BJ actually did it.

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2 hours ago, POR said:

Interesting news coming  out of southampton running a four week test for covid using saliva instead of swabs only takes 20 minutes rather than 12 hours to check if trials successful going to give all the people of southampton  some quarter of a million weekly tests and according to the so called scientists it has the potential to be run out all over the country in a very large scale at multiple locations

Old news really. Avacta, who are based in Wetherby, are one of the companies behind it

https://avacta.com/diagnostics/covid-19/

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