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11 hours ago, Padge said:

Are you using the internet or world wide web?

I’m using the Information Super Highway

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3 hours ago, Shadow said:

I’m using the Information Super Highway

Is that Internet-ish

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Radio 5 Live: Saturday 14 April 2007

Dave Whelan "In Wigan rugby will always be king"

 

This country's wealth was created by men in overalls, it was destroyed by men in suits.

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The first Internet browser I used was Gopher.

Visit my photography site www.padge.smugmug.com

Radio 5 Live: Saturday 14 April 2007

Dave Whelan "In Wigan rugby will always be king"

 

This country's wealth was created by men in overalls, it was destroyed by men in suits.

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19 hours ago, Johnoco said:

Whatever happened to that term?

Remember a segment on a magazine show about the "information super highway" featuring a group of young men who, perhaps tired of figuratively having sand kicked in their faces, had retreated to the safety of something called an "internet cafe". The programme also had an item about Goldie`s Timeless album, which would date it around 94/95.

Didn`t seem of any significance at the time. Just reminded me of one rainy school lunch time in the early 80s wandering up to "computer club", to watch some nerdy bore press a few buttons. The previous couple of years we`d all been press-ganged into sponsored walks and biscuit sales to buy the damned thing.

 

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21 hours ago, Padge said:

The first Internet browser I used was Gopher.

I chucked away a book on Gopher recently while having a clear out.

Starting using email in 1990 at University, and used FTP and newsgroups (e.g. rec.sport.rugby) around the same time. Email at work from 1992, and we had gopher plus very limited web access from 1994, including a service where you emailed the URL of the page you wanted to a server and it emailed the html page back to you which you could then view in Mosaic - none of this clicking on links business.  Don't think I got internet at home until 1995 and my hotmail account is from 1996.

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On 07/05/2021 at 12:53, Johnoco said:

We are now at the stage where we can argue on here whenever we want. You just need to get your phone or iPad out and away you go.

I've worked for 25 years in silicon chip design. Pretty much any device you can use to access the internet has stuff inside that I've worked on. We had a presentation at work at some point in the late nineties about how the mobile internet was going to make us our fortunes and that most adults, even in the poorest countries of the world, would use mobile phones and the internet. I remember sitting there wondering what these people were smoking - just couldn't imagine why people would want to use the internet while out and about.

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3 minutes ago, JonM said:

I've worked for 25 years in silicon chip design. Pretty much any device you can use to access the internet has stuff inside that I've worked on. We had a presentation at work at some point in the late nineties about how the mobile internet was going to make us our fortunes and that most adults, even in the poorest countries of the world, would use mobile phones and the internet. I remember sitting there wondering what these people were smoking - just couldn't imagine why people would want to use the internet while out and about.

While I wasn’t remotely involved in any level like you, I remember a lecturer at Uni telling me the same sort of thing, this would have been around 1995. I thought he was doing an article for Tomorrow’s World, in the style of ‘by the year 2000 we’ll all be eating food pills and riding hover boards’. It seemed so absurd that I didn’t even take him seriously. 
And yet......😆

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As far as browsers are concerned, I started on IE, tried Netscape (didn't like it), then was a very early adopter of Opera. Now I use Vivaldi, which was developed by the people originally behind Opera.

I'd tried Vivaldi a couple of times before in previous years, but it wasn't quite ready then.

"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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2 hours ago, JonM said:

I've worked for 25 years in silicon chip design. Pretty much any device you can use to access the internet has stuff inside that I've worked on. We had a presentation at work at some point in the late nineties about how the mobile internet was going to make us our fortunes and that most adults, even in the poorest countries of the world, would use mobile phones and the internet. I remember sitting there wondering what these people were smoking - just couldn't imagine why people would want to use the internet while out and about.

I went on an e-marketing course a couple of years ago where we were all told how the advent of £25 smartphones from China would open up the untapped markets in Africa as the people living there would have access to the web to buy stuff.

what they didn’t explain was how they would pay for it, I asked and the presenter banged on about stripe and recurly missing the fact that if they have an annual income of under $2k then online shopping is not going to be high on their priority list

 

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In a previous life I remember working for the coal board when we got our first computers with 2x 5¼inch floppy disc sockets.

We'd do our weekly accounts using lotus 123 and save to disc and send the disc in the post to the area hq.

No windows then. No Internet. No email. dos was the operating system. Primitive stuff that now.

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Earliest computer memories - an Olivetti my mum bought for her business. Only one disc socket, so you put in the "Boot" disk, switched on, then replaced it with the "Word Processor" disc (or whatever programme you needed to run. That would have been 1984-1985, I think. What little it it, it did pretty well, but the speed of development when Apple and Microsoft entered the market and went head-to-head was astonishing.

I remember being so happy when Windows 95 came along and I no longer had to fiddle around in pifedit.exe to make things work.

Edited by Futtocks

"Men will be proud to say 'I am a European'. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native land." (Winston Churchill)

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Earliest memories are the old zx spectrum. It was one thing taking ages to load a game up but worse than that was getting a computer magazine at the time and typing a game in out of that. It took ages to do and then would invariably come up with an error  at the end. 

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Earliest computer experience:school visit 1960/1961 to Manchester University to see their Ferranti Mercury.

First job in computers. 1962 joined Ferranti Computer Equipment Group West Gorton as student engineer  to be trained and educated to become field engineer on Ferranti FP6000 -which on takeover in 1963 became ICT 1900 series. They paid me for 6 years to go through college full time along with a few others. I stayed in the sector until retirement just a few years ago, working for British and US companies and on my own account, too.

So: Internet/hypertext/WWW: Much ignored player is Ted Nelson. Never heard of him? 

 https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Nelson

This website belongs to John Walker, one of the founders of Autodesk (the company behind AutoCAD design software,  Revit, Inventor, most media and entertainment software etc) tells a bit more

 https://www.fourmilab.ch/autofile/www/section2_64_1.html tells a bit more. 

 

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Four legs good - two legs bad

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On 07/05/2021 at 20:33, Padge said:

The internet existed in a command line form as a means of exchanging data but was hard work for the home user to use or understand. That world still exists, the invention of an animal named the WWW provided a layer above that that we use in general on our fancy devices.

Somewhat simplified.

I remember using Telnet and FTP to connect to remote hosts long before Hypertext Transfer Protocol enabled the proliferation of the World Wide Web. The first hypertext documents I can remember using were the electronic versions of our Novell Netware manuals. 

Old Faithful we never lose at Wembley

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As mentioned in my earlier post: The term hypertext was coined by Ted Nelson in 1965 in the Xanadu Project, which was in turn inspired by Vannevar Bush's 1930s vision of the microfilm-based information retrieval and management "memex" system described in his 1945 essay "As We May Think". Tim Berners-Lee and his team at CERN are credited with inventing the original HTTP, along with HTML and the associated technology for a web server and a text-based web browser. Berners-Lee first proposed the "WorldWideWeb" project in 1989—now known as the World Wide Web. The first version of the protocol had only one method, namely GET, which would request a page from a server.[14] The response from the server was always an HTML page.

We were being asked by a potential customer if our stystem supported hyperlinks back around 1992. We didn't.  Planted question from our competitors.

Four legs good - two legs bad

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On 09/05/2021 at 11:50, Shadow said:

I went on an e-marketing course a couple of years ago where we were all told how the advent of £25 smartphones from China would open up the untapped markets in Africa as the people living there would have access to the web to buy stuff.

what they didn’t explain was how they would pay for it, I asked and the presenter banged on about stripe and recurly missing the fact that if they have an annual income of under $2k then online shopping is not going to be high on their priority list

More people worldwide have a mobile phone than have access to clean water, which I think is an interesting reflection on people's priorities. 

The Bangladeshi Nobel Prize Economist Muhammad Yunus once said that mobile phone companies have done more for the people of the third world than all of the world's NGOs. The mpesa mobile payment system is massive in Africa. People who go to towns to earn money don't have rely on middlemen to send it back home to their families in their home village, they just use the internet. 

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On 11/05/2021 at 15:52, Ullman said:

I remember using Telnet and FTP to connect to remote hosts long before Hypertext Transfer Protocol enabled the proliferation of the World Wide Web. The first hypertext documents I can remember using were the electronic versions of our Novell Netware manuals. 

Whoaaa! Slow down professor. 😆😆 Some of us are the big thickos from the island. 

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1 hour ago, Johnoco said:

Whoaaa! Slow down professor. 😆😆 Some of us are the big thickos from the island. 

Classic Father Teddery, mate.👍

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Old Faithful we never lose at Wembley

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Me and the wife went to buy a PC when we lived in Brunei around 1996. I remember arguing with the bloke trying to sell us it that we didn't want that new fangled internet thing because neither of us could see what on Earth we would ever do with it.

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