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Things you were into before they became popular


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Something I find very annoying is when you are into something that is not widely known about but due to whatever reason it suddenly becomes really popular and people think you have just jumped on the bandwagon with everyone else despite you being there from the start. 

The perfect example of this sort of thing is Game of Thrones. I feel so sorry for the original fans of these novels before the tv series was made and it became one of the biggest things in the world. Suddenly those original, devoted, diehard fans will have had people calling them sheep and just thinking they like it because they think they are supposed to or something. 

And so I am wondering what hobbies/interests did you have before they became popular/mainstream/fashionable? 

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Classical music, for starters. Not instead of other musical genres, but in addition to them.  Lived though the period when the BBC tried to throttle is own child, the Proms. Now it's de rigeur to be a fan.

I'd add to that rugby league apart from the fact that it's not quite mainstream or fashionable, yet.

Edited by JohnM
spellings corrected.
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People who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do.

Isaac Asimov

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Saw most of the Britpop era bands at tiny venues in the 1990s before they became a thing and the phrase itself was christened.

This is especially true of Oasis and Radiohead, but others as well - I’ve even found myself stood just in front of Noel and Liam who came as punters to a small Stone Roses gig in Manchester during the early part of Oasis’ rise.  No camera phones back then or internet and better for it.

I wouldn’t say I was especially annoyed at when the whole shebang went mainstream, but I’d already moved on by that time in musical tastes and influences to the more interesting stuff.

 

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2 hours ago, JohnM said:

Classical music, for starters. Not instead of other musical genres, but in addition to them.  Lived though the period when the BBC tried to throttle is own child, the Proms. Now it's de rigour to be a fan.

Is it? I knew the world would come round to my way of thinking.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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I was on board to watch the first series of the Great British Bake Off in 2010, I think I lasted until the move to Channel 4 but I lost interest.

While I can't claim to have been at the Edinburgh Fringe festival in 2010 I was definitely on board and hooked when the first series of Taskmaster started on Dave in 2015. This is something I followed to Channel 4 and stuck with.

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The term 'mosh pit' (and stage diving)  You hear it used by all sorts of mainstream people these days but it was specifically from a certain music scene. It came from the hardcore and thrash metal scene and refers to the insane 'dancing' that used to occur in 'the pit', with people smashing #### out of each other but mostly in a friendly way. Even more specifically, it actually refers to slower parts of fast stuff with a more 'skanky' feel, as opposed to breakneck speed. And the term was allegedly coined by Vinnie Stigma of Agnostic Front.

Now you hear madness about the mosh pit at Ed Sheeran gigs or something. Stop it. 

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Waistcoats. I've worn them for years. Then that upstart that manages the England footy team starts poncing about in them and suddenly everyone's got them on.....

I have to echo John's earlier comments. Rugby League might as we be played on Mars with the interest it has amongst folk here in Rovrum. 

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I had a year off after high school before I went to university, it was rare at the time as most kids obediently trudged off to uni.

Loads of kids do it now and it`s called a " gap year " and it`s rather fashionable.

I also didn`t get my first full-time job until I was 33, I used to look at people in the workforce and think that was for mugs, there will be plenty of time in the work force when I get there. Loads of kids drift now - maybe just not that long !

Funny thing was my father, one of these blokes who started work at 15 used to say to me ` half your luck I wish I could have done the same thing`.

 

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, The Rocket said:

I had a year off after high school before I went to university, it was rare at the time as most kids obediently trudged off to uni.

Loads of kids do it now and it`s called a " gap year " and it`s rather fashionable.

I also didn`t get my first full-time job until I was 33, I used to look at people in the workforce and think that was for mugs, there will be plenty of time in the work force when I get there. Loads of kids drift now - maybe just not that long !

Funny thing was my father, one of these blokes who started work at 15 used to say to me ` half your luck I wish I could have done the same thing`.

 

 

 

 

Pretty much how my lad did it.... 

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Our family got a Rubik's Cube at least a year before it hit the West and became a craze. My mum's company published some music by a Hungarian composer, and our families had become friends. About twice a year, we'd send each other a big box of stuff - books, games, bottles of weird booze, anything we thought the other would like, or not be able to get in their country.

One of the boxes we received (literally a tea chest) included several small, multicoloured objects. One was a Rubik's Cube (called 'Magic Cube' back then), and the others were similar physical puzzles, some of which I've never seen anywhere else.

Despite the head start, neither me or my sister ever got good at it.

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"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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1 hour ago, DavidM said:

By the end of Christmas Day it was thrown at the wall in head banging frustration 

I don't know about the models that hit the non-Hungarian market, but you could prise the individual cubes out and put them back in the "solved" order.

Don't tell Ryan Hall!

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Here's another one, though it perhaps more about changing the meaning of the actual term.

R & B  goes back to the late 40s then Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, and in the UK Alexis Korner - Blues Incorporated, Long John Baldry, the Animals, even- all sounds of my yoof, way before Beyonce.

need to find a new term for what is called R and B these days. How about "####"?

Edited by JohnM
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People who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do.

Isaac Asimov

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1 hour ago, JohnM said:

Here's another one, though it perhaps more about changing the meaning of the actual term.

R & B  goes back to the late 40s then Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, and in the UK Alexis Korner - Blues Incorporated, Long John Baldry, the Animals, even- all sounds of my yoof, way before Beyonce.

need to find a new term for what is called R and B these days. How about "####"?

I have to agree with this one, this modern R&B is nothing like the traditional and original rhythm and blues and it does annoy me when young people these days use the term for the generic pop rubbish that gets put out these days. 

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When I moved to Denmark, my preference for ale of lager was seen as ignorance. As soon as I tried lager, I would never look back. 

A few years later, I was being enthusiastically introduced to pale ale. 

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"You clearly have never met Bob8 then, he's like a veritable Bryan Ferry of RL." - Johnoco 19 Jul 2014

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8 hours ago, Bob8 said:

When I moved to Denmark, my preference for ale of lager was seen as ignorance. As soon as I tried lager, I would never look back. 

A few years later, I was being enthusiastically introduced to pale ale. 

There is a tendency for newer hipsters to regard Pale Ale as some sort of new drink - and also the same for Gin, as if it hasn't been around for hundreds of years.

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8 hours ago, The Hallucinating Goose said:

I have to agree with this one, this modern R&B is nothing like the traditional and original rhythm and blues and it does annoy me when young people these days use the term for the generic pop rubbish that gets put out these days. 

I've had similar arguments with people from the dance scene who have tried to commandeer the term 'hardcore'. There is only one hardcore and that is the one that emerged from the punk scene. End of.

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16 hours ago, The Hallucinating Goose said:

I have to agree with this one, this modern R&B is nothing like the traditional and original rhythm and blues and it does annoy me when young people these days use the term for the generic pop rubbish that gets put out these days. 

R&B has been used to describe the music that old people think sounds the same and why don't they have any talent these days since at least the early 90s - cos that's how they stocked it in Our Price.

That's at least 30 years.

So, y'know, that battle is lost.

Mind you, sometimes I hear people telling me that what they've just heard on Radio 3 is classical music. And I say, no darling, that was definitely baroque.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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8 hours ago, Johnoco said:

There is a tendency for newer hipsters to regard Pale Ale as some sort of new drink - and also the same for Gin, as if it hasn't been around for hundreds of years.

The Gin thing really does my head in. Gin was always stereotypically an old ladies drink and then hipsters discovered it and suddenly anyone who is the slightest bit pretentious and above their station started to think it was this new wonder drink. Essentially one of the most boring, unglamorous drinks became the most fashionable. I've known people who would have a glass of wine or a beer suddenly claim they were the biggest fan of gin and had always drunk it despite me never having heard or seen them drink or even mention the stuff before. 

I do hate hipsters and their ability to take run of the mill, everyday things and make them pretentious. Beards is another one, throughout my life since I've been able to grow one I've had beards on and off and then about 10 years ago hipsters started growing them, bushier the better and now I feel like I can't have one cos I will be seen to be copying those idiots. 

Edited by The Hallucinating Goose
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48 minutes ago, The Hallucinating Goose said:

The Gin thing really does my head in. Gin was always stereotypically an old ladies drink and then hipsters discovered it and suddenly anyone who is the slightest bit pretentious and above their station started to think it was this new wonder drink. Essentially one of the most boring, unglamorous drinks became the most fashionable. I've known people who would have a glass of wine or a beer suddenly claim they were the biggest fan of gin and had always drunk it despite me never having heard or seen them drink or even mention the stuff before. 

I do hate hipsters and their ability to take run of the mill, everyday things and make them pretentious. Beards is another one, throughout my life since I've been able to grow one I've had beards on and off and then about 10 years ago hipsters started growing them, bushier the better and now I feel like I can't have one cos I will be seen to be copying those idiots. 

I actually like Gin but I hear what you are saying. One of the best G&T's is a straightforward Gordons and Schweppes Tonic. Some people seem to believe you have to get exotic gin and a tonic that costs £25 for a tiny bottle.

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4 minutes ago, Robin Evans said:

Prosecco. Biggest non-political con this century.

Good example. As I said in the original post, it's not even that these people make run of the mill things pretentious, don't get me wrong that is a big factor to my annoyance but it tends to be when you couple it with people claiming they've always loved said thing despite having only known about it for a matter of days.

You'll always get that one hipster who just discovers something and then makes it their entire identity and starts claiming they are the go to authority on it and if anyone else tries to embrace the same thing they'll get quite offended claiming you are trespassing in their domain so to speak.

Either they'll get offended or they'll let you like the same thing but they'll mention every two seconds that they were the first one to like the thing with you copying them and them only and thus ignoring the millions of people that have loved the thing for decades but just didn't feel the need to shout about it like this arrogant a**ehole.

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Prosecco, pretentious? It's hen party fuel.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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