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1 minute ago, TheFlash said:

OK. If you prefer, fair enough.

I just happen to call it football. Along with pretty much the rest of the world. 

Call it what you like, but don't deny that it's often called soccer all over the world, including the UK.  Hence, Soccer AM.

Anyway, it's rubbish since Bury left 🙁

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1 hour ago, Leeds Wire said:

Call it what you like, but don't deny that it's often called soccer all over the world, including the UK.  Hence, Soccer AM.

Anyway, it's rubbish since Bury left 🙁

The English derision of the term soccer has not always been there. The news reports in English newspapers from 1966 use 'soccer' very liberally and it was common place well into the 70s....it did of course originate from the the public schools as a derivation of Assosiation football (in the same way 'rugger' did)

I love the term.... it really annoys soccer fans when I do 😀

Edited by Bedfordshire Bronco
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Yes in a country known for not using the english language.

They reserve the term football for a game where the ball is thrown, caught and run  with using hands.  Only in (north) America eh?

Interesting even they call the five a side game futsal with an ‘f’

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3 hours ago, Anita Bath said:

Yes in a country known for not using the english language.

They reserve the term football for a game where the ball is thrown, caught and run  with using hands.  Only in (north) America eh?

Interesting even they call the five a side game futsal with an ‘f’

You do realise "football" relates to games played on foot (rather than on horseback).

Soccer has been used for over a century in the UK to distinguish from other types of football, in particular rugby football, and as stated comes from its full name of association football.

The idea that soccer is not British English is purely revisionist. It's just like rugby union referring to itself as just "rugby" in the UK whereas it was always referred to as rugby union to make a distinction to proper rugby. It's a claim to domination. 

See also "Hockey" which would be field hockey in the UK but ice hockey in Canada.

Leeds United always had AFC on their shirts. 

 

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No I didn’t realise that……handball is played “on foot”, tennis is played “on foot”, basketball is played “on foot”,  netball too…..thats an awful lot of sports played “on foot” that under the non revisionist world you speak of would all be forms of football.

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27 minutes ago, Anita Bath said:

No I didn’t realise that……handball is played “on foot”, tennis is played “on foot”, basketball is played “on foot”,  netball too…..thats an awful lot of sports played “on foot” that under the non revisionist world you speak of would all be forms of football.

Why should all games played on foot be called football? That's just silly.

The origins of the different codes of football were closely related, emerging from games played at English public schools in the 19th Century and later codified by their relevant organisations. This includes association football (soccer in the UK), rugby union football (rugger in the UK), rugby league football, American football, Canadian football, Australian football. Each has their own, mostly localised, distinguishing name.

I think you probably already knew this but are just fishing for bites. Google is your friend.

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4 hours ago, Wholly Trinity said:

Soccer has been used for over a century in the UK to distinguish from other types of football, in particular rugby football, and as stated comes from its full name of association football.

The idea that soccer is not British English is purely revisionist. 

It is one of those daft arguments where the people who believe it won't budge, despite all the obvious evidence that they're talking nonsense.

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Lexicographer Susie Dent has said language meaning ( semantics) is dependent on the meaning people give it, not the other way round, language isn't set in stone. Soccer is universally known as football,  except where it needs to be distinguished from other " football " codes, ie US Australia NZ. If you are in say Berlin and a native says , " let's go to the football " you wouldn't expect RL. Those non soccer fans insisting on calling it that are usually doing so because they regard RL ,or RU or NFL as proper football, or to wind people up as Bedfordshire Bronco admitted,  or to latch on to the popularity of " football " as in "yeah football is no. 1 sport, RL is football so yeah we're no.1"

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43 minutes ago, HawkMan said:

Lexicographer Susie Dent has said language meaning ( semantics) is dependent on the meaning people give it, not the other way round, language isn't set in stone. Soccer is universally known as football,  except where it needs to be distinguished from other " football " codes, ie US Australia NZ. If you are in say Berlin and a native says , " let's go to the football " you wouldn't expect RL. Those non soccer fans insisting on calling it that are usually doing so because they regard RL ,or RU or NFL as proper football, or to wind people up as Bedfordshire Bronco admitted,  or to latch on to the popularity of " football " as in "yeah football is no. 1 sport, RL is football so yeah we're no.1"

But the odd thing here is how soccer fans get so uppity about their sport being referred to by one of its historic names.

Yes, sure in Sydney you might say "footy" and mean NRL, in Melbourne AFL etc. But no-one in those places would react with childish outrage if you called them Rugby League or Australian Rules.

There is a comic combination of superiority and ignorance on display when soccer fans are confronted with the reality that their sport doesn't, and never has, had a monopoly on the word "football" - and that "soccer" isn't some terrible Americanism but a name which goes back through the very history of the sport in England.

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3 hours ago, Wholly Trinity said:

Why should all games played on foot be called football? That's just silly.

The origins of the different codes of football were closely related, emerging from games played at English public schools in the 19th Century and later codified by their relevant organisations. This includes association football (soccer in the UK), rugby union football (rugger in the UK), rugby league football, American football, Canadian football, Australian football. Each has their own, mostly localised, distinguishing name.

I think you probably already knew this but are just fishing for bites. Google is your friend.

It was your explanation i was responding to….played on foot as opposed to played on horseback…now that is just plain silly. The name football comes from the ball being played with the foot, which is how it developed.  rugby football and association football gradually developed from different interpretations of the laws of football, including, so the story goes, some kid in rugby instead of kicking the ball with his foot, picked it up and ran with it. However kicking the ball remained the main way of playing the ball under rugby laws for several years and the purpose of scoring a ‘try’ was to give the team a ‘try’ at kicking a goal. The try carried no points in those early days of rugby football.

 

Not from google incidentally….I prefer reading those things with pages in them, books I think they call them, wether you read them on foot or on horseback.

 

As Jim Royle would say “played on foot…my ar**”

 

 

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48 minutes ago, Anita Bath said:

  rugby football and association football gradually developed from different interpretations of the laws of football, including, so the story goes, some kid in rugby instead of kicking the ball with his foot, picked it up and ran with it.

OK you can discuss the silly issues soccer fans with their game being called soccer all you like.

But coming on here and blurting out rugby union propaganda, its made-up creation myth, something devised specifically to remove the working classes and therefore the breakaway Northern Union as having any role in the development of the sport, is absolute ###### and you ain't getting away with it.

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'Soccer' has been with us since the 1880s. And its origins are British.  It's a colloquialism to distinguish association football from the other codes of football played at the time. Its use to distinguish the game from 'American Football' (or just 'football') in the US has, as the game has grown there and we have become increasingly exposed to/influenced by US culture, has led it to feel like an American construction (especially when pronounced as 'sacker').

But it's as legitimate a name for football as 'football'.

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4 minutes ago, Billy King's Boots said:

'Soccer' has been with us since the 1880s. And its origins are British.  It's a colloquialism to distinguish association football from the other codes of football played at the time. Its use to distinguish the game from 'American Football' (or just 'football') in the US has, as the game has grown there and we have become increasingly exposed to/influenced by US culture, has led it to feel like an American construction (especially when pronounced as 'sacker').

But it's as legitimate a name for football as 'football'.

Quite. It's from the same sort of construction that gave us "rugger", i.e. Association (soc) football.

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2 hours ago, Anita Bath said:

It was your explanation i was responding to….played on foot as opposed to played on horseback…now that is just plain silly. The name football comes from the ball being played with the foot, which is how it developed.  rugby football and association football gradually developed from different interpretations of the laws of football, including, so the story goes, some kid in rugby instead of kicking the ball with his foot, picked it up and ran with it. However kicking the ball remained the main way of playing the ball under rugby laws for several years and the purpose of scoring a ‘try’ was to give the team a ‘try’ at kicking a goal. The try carried no points in those early days of rugby football.

 

Not from google incidentally….I prefer reading those things with pages in them, books I think they call them, wether you read them on foot or on horseback.

 

As Jim Royle would say “played on foot…my ar**”

 

 

At least we're agreed that soccer is a perfectly legitimate and historical British name for a sport more commonly called football in the UK in modern times. 

Rugby and soccer do not have a common ancestry as they developed independently from different schools. Web Ellis is absolute myth.

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there are cas fans who actually think the recent resurgence in popularity of "sweet caroline" is down to the tigers and their fans- thats the sort of world some people live in 

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did the bloke who invented the phrase "one hit wonder" invent anything else?

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1 minute ago, graveyard johnny said:

there are cas fans who actually think the recent resurgence in popularity of "sweet caroline" is down to the tigers and their fans- thats the sort of world some people live in 

Another horrible dirge......

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