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PNG reaping the benefits


Tosh
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37 minutes ago, jim_57 said:


PNG have already beaten Great Britain fairly convincingly in 2019 so the first shock victory is under their belt in that regard. I’d love to see them get more games against NZ, Tonga, Samoa, Australia, England & Fiji in coming years to really see how they’re improving.

This.

They also beat Fiji in the pacific tests this year and really should have beaten Tonga in the World Cup group game.

Its about time that PNG started to tour France and UK as well as host Australia and NZ.

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6 hours ago, MatthewWoody said:

I find it hard to compare PNG with any European or American nation, as rl is the most played sport in PNG.

It’s a perfect example of luck and how putting in the hard groundwork can payoff.

The hardwork is being done by the PNGRL, QRL and both PNG&australian governments in both funding and creating structures and pathways for talented kumuls to progress from schools RL to local leagues and then onto the digicel cup before the top elite players in PNG get selected for the professional Hunters side competing in the Queensland cup.

The luck is their geographical location being situated right next to the strongest RL playing nation Australia and it’s domestic professional league the NRL and strong 2nd tier Queensland cup competition.

Edited by Tosh
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40 minutes ago, Tosh said:

It’s a perfect example of luck and how putting in the hard groundwork can payoff.

The hardwork is being done by the PNGRL, QRL and both PNG&australian governments in both funding and creating structures and pathways for talented kumuls to progress from schools RL to local leagues and then onto the digicel cup before the top elite players in PNG get selected for the professional Hunters side competing in the Queensland cup.

The luck is their geographical location being situated right next to the strongest RL playing nation Australia and it’s domestic professional league the NRL and strong 2nd tier Queensland cup competition.

You seem to be ignoring the part where is already the national sport in PNG and widely played. 

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17 minutes ago, Damien said:

You seem to be ignoring the part where is already the national sport in PNG and widely played. 

And you seem to be ignoring the part where for nearly half a century there wasn’t any structures in place on the ground in PNG for the kumuls to produce quality players for the professional leagues in Australia and the UK in decent numbers and thus not being  able  compete against the top tier nations.

 

Your judgement seems to be clouded  by an irrational hatred of all things Australian RL.

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13 minutes ago, Tosh said:

And you seem to be ignoring the part where for nearly half a century there wasn’t any structures in place on the ground in PNG for the kumuls to produce quality players for the professional leagues in Australia and the UK in decent numbers and thus not being  able  compete against the top tier nations.

 

Your judgement seems to be clouded  by an irrational hatred of all things Australian RL.

What a bizarre reply, all because you are trying to frame an argument while ignoring the obvious truth and are trying to equate RL in PNG with a developing country, it's nonsense. I mean PNG were beating Great Britain in 1990 with Jonathan Davies, Garry Schofield et al and only losing by 2 and 6 points on other tours without any of these structure in place.

Your entire premise is analogous to if RL was easily the dominant sport in Ireland, say like GAA, and saying how English RL should tap into that. Frankly it would be a doddle. Instead, what we actually have is Ireland having barely any boda fide teams, nothing in schools, competition from numerous much bigger and wealthier sports and a bunch of players that actually largely focus on other codes.

Edited by Damien
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2 hours ago, Damien said:

What a bizarre reply, all because you are trying to frame an argument while ignoring the obvious truth and are trying to equate RL in PNG with a developing country, it's nonsense. I mean PNG were beating Great Britain in 1990 with Jonathan Davies, Garry Schofield et al and only losing by 2 and 6 points on other tours without any of these structure in place.

Your entire premise is analogous to if RL was easily the dominant sport in Ireland, say like GAA, and saying how English RL should tap into that. Frankly it would be a doddle. Instead, what we actually have is Ireland having barely any boda fide teams, nothing in schools, competition from numerous much bigger and wealthier sports and a bunch of players that actually largely focus on other codes.

I’ve never once claimed that RL wasn’t the National game in PNG or that it’s played by huge numbers all throughout the country.

Neither have I claimed that PNG is a developing country.

Again you seem to be unable to acknowledge the role of Australian RL and the Australian government in helping developing structures and pathways for talented kumuls.

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37 minutes ago, Tosh said:

I’ve never once claimed that RL wasn’t the National game in PNG or that it’s played by huge numbers all throughout the country.

Neither have I claimed that PNG is a developing country.

Again you seem to be unable to acknowledge the role of Australian RL and the Australian government in helping developing structures and pathways for talented kumuls.

I mean I literally talked about the support from the Australia Government on the last page but you do you. It's not my fault your logic and comparisons are built on sand.

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4 minutes ago, Damien said:

I mean I literally talked about the support from the Australia Government on the last page but you do you. It's not my fault your logic and comparisons are built on sand.

You seem to be having a hard time distinguishing between developing a tier2 nation like PNG into a tier1 nation and developing RL nations that have little to no domestic RL competitions and grassroots activities.

To borrow a phrase from you “but you do you.”

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1 minute ago, Tosh said:

You seem to be having a hard time distinguishing between developing a tier2 nation like PNG into a tier1 nation and developing RL nations that have little to no domestic RL competitions and grassroots activities.

To borrow a phrase from you “but you do you.”

It's funny how you keep shifting the goalposts when proven wrong and then reply with something completely unconnected just to keep arguing. Quite pathetic really.

You simply just seem to have a hard understanding anything. There are no other tier 2 nations like PNG, a country of 9 million with RL as the national sport and plenty of players and blanket coverage. Feel free to shift the goalposts again.

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5 minutes ago, Damien said:

It's funny how you keep shifting the goalposts when proven wrong and then reply with something completely unconnected just to keep arguing. Quite pathetic really.

You simply just seem to have a hard understanding anything. There are no other tier 2 nations like PNG, a country of 9 million with RL as the national sport and plenty of players and blanket coverage. Feel free to shift the goalposts again.

Projection much.

Again I’m not now nor ever claiming that RL isn’t the National sport in PNG or that there isn’t another tier2 nation like them.

I suggest you go back and read my opening post in this thread slowly and throughly.

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5 minutes ago, Tosh said:

Projection much.

Again I’m not now nor ever claiming that RL isn’t the National sport in PNG or that there isn’t another tier2 nation like them.

I suggest you go back and read my opening post in this thread slowly and throughly.

You are saying that PNG are the blueprint in developing RL in 2nd tier and developing nations going forward and that this must be replicated in other countries in the Pacific, Europe and Jamaica. You claim that they are where they are because of the hard work and development being put in by the QRL, PNGRL and both Australian & PNG governments in funding and creating pathways for talented players. In a subsequent post you reply to someone on this page, dismissing their view that PMG is incomparable to developing nations as it is the most played sport, and state that instead it is just the perfect example of luck and putting in the groundwork. From there you hop about in your replies arguing apples v pears when the flaws with your premise are pointed out.

What your airbrushing of history completely ignores:

  • RL in PNG has existed for 50 years
  • It is the national sport
  • It has a population of 9 million that is obsessed with Rugby League
  • It has a government that sees RL has a means to develop the country
  • It has always had dozens of domestic leagues.
  • It has always produced numerous great players over the years
  • PNG was beating GB 30+ years ago
  • This strongest ever, in your words, PNG team actually lost by 40 points v England in the quarter final which was 10 points more than the same game in 2013.
  • That we just need a national government willing to plough in tens of millions to extend its sphere of influence

So, in short as long as we can find another tier 2 or developing country that ticks all of the above boxes then we can use PNG as the blueprint.

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On 25/11/2022 at 18:09, Damien said:

You are saying that PNG are the blueprint in developing RL in 2nd tier and developing nations going forward and that this must be replicated in other countries in the Pacific, Europe and Jamaica. You claim that they are where they are because of the hard work and development being put in by the QRL, PNGRL and both Australian & PNG governments in funding and creating pathways for talented players. In a subsequent post you reply to someone on this page, dismissing their view that PMG is incomparable to developing nations as it is the most played sport, and state that instead it is just the perfect example of luck and putting in the groundwork. From there you hop about in your replies arguing apples v pears when the flaws with your premise are pointed out.

What your airbrushing of history completely ignores:

  • RL in PNG has existed for 50 years
  • It is the national sport
  • It has a population of 9 million that is obsessed with Rugby League
  • It has a government that sees RL has a means to develop the country
  • It has always had dozens of domestic leagues.
  • It has always produced numerous great players over the years
  • PNG was beating GB 30+ years ago
  • This strongest ever, in your words, PNG team actually lost by 40 points v England in the quarter final which was 10 points more than the same game in 2013.
  • That we just need a national government willing to plough in tens of millions to extend its sphere of influence

So, in short as long as we can find another tier 2 or developing country that ticks all of the above boxes then we can use PNG as the blueprint.

The model/blue print that I’m advocating for tier2 nations and developing nations is the one currently being used in PNG with the hunters and for Fiji with silktails in which a clear pathway has been introduced for the best RL talent in both countries domestic competitions to progress into a professional environment such as the Queensland cup for the hunters and the Ron Massey cup for the silktails which will eventually be the NSW cup.

These recent pathways have been put in place by governing RL organizations and governments working together with private investment and sponsorship to ensure these 2 teams are competing at a higher and professional level and yes because of this I think that not only have PNG benefited from this but they are also the strongest they’ve ever been in their history of playing the game.

Now for whatever reason my statement on the recent developments on the ground in PNG has triggered you and got you using facts that RL is the National sport in PNG and that PNG once beat GB 30+ years ago etc all of which I completely agree with you and not denying.

I honestly don’t know what you are getting all upset with mate and can only presume that you object to the work being done by the Australians within PNG and that RL in PNG was better off without the hunters ??
 

Edited by Tosh
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Even more evidence that things are happening:

PNG Reflections – One Month On | Broncos

In a recent trip to Papua New Guinea, Scott Prince, Delouise Hoeter, Keenan Palasia and Ethan Quai-Ward were given a warm welcome by the beautiful people of Port Moresby.

Joined by Broncos CEO Dave Donaghy and Wellbeing & Education Manager Adam Walsh, the players visited several schools to share important messages around being active and healthy, working hard at school and saving for their future. At times, it was hard to tell who was enjoying the experience more - the students or the Broncos ambassadors! 

It was Donaghy’s first trip to PNG, where he also met with Prime Minister James Marape.

 I mean like the CEO goes there and also meets with the Prime Minister, how many other sporting organisations get that sort of welcome. Big plans afoot for PNG, sounds like there`s going to be a bit of a goldrush on for NRL clubs in PNG.

 

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13 minutes ago, The Rocket said:

Even more evidence that things are happening:

PNG Reflections – One Month On | Broncos

In a recent trip to Papua New Guinea, Scott Prince, Delouise Hoeter, Keenan Palasia and Ethan Quai-Ward were given a warm welcome by the beautiful people of Port Moresby.

Joined by Broncos CEO Dave Donaghy and Wellbeing & Education Manager Adam Walsh, the players visited several schools to share important messages around being active and healthy, working hard at school and saving for their future. At times, it was hard to tell who was enjoying the experience more - the students or the Broncos ambassadors! 

It was Donaghy’s first trip to PNG, where he also met with Prime Minister James Marape.

 I mean like the CEO goes there and also meets with the Prime Minister, how many other sporting organisations get that sort of welcome. Big plans afoot for PNG, sounds like there`s going to be a bit of a goldrush on for NRL clubs in PNG.

 

Because of the population of PNG 9 million+ and rising fast year on year and the fact that RL is not only the National sport but seen as a religion in that country then there’s no reason why with the right investment, structures and pathways that PNG can’t become the biggest net exporters of RL talent to the NRL eclipsing both Fiji and NZ in the next 10-15 years.

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