Saintslass

Coach
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Everything posted by Saintslass

  1. Saintslass

    The all-new-ish Brexit Thread

    I'm sure they do, although I wouldn't necessarily include migration in their particular concerns given that the chances are migration will be their raison d'etre. However, if you silence ordinary people who do have valid, legitimate concerns about the scale and rate of migration and about how divided our nation is becoming in certain areas as a result of too much migration in too short a time then you risk funnelling those ordinary people into the same dark place as the people in the photos you responded to. Personally, I don't want to risk that, do you?
  2. Saintslass

    The all-new-ish Brexit Thread

    Do we still have a treason law in this country? I thought Tony Blair's government abolished it? I don't have a view on whether we should have a treason law, I just thought it was one of those historic laws which have gone by the wayside, like blasphemy.
  3. Saintslass

    Religion

    Were you brought up in the Catholic church by any chance? It's just that your post sounds like many responses I've received down the years from former Catholics. When Catholics abandon their faith they do seem to do so very bitterly.
  4. Saintslass

    Religion

    Well, the Bible has a lot of things to say about that sort of behaviour, and a conversion to faith has been known to make a big difference to people with bad lives. For example, there was a feature on the BBC news recently - a couple of months ago - about this massive (and growing) Christian church in London that was started by a former gang member and which reaches out specifically to gang members. They do what Christians have always done, and go out on a mission not just to 'tell them about Jesus' but also to meet their practical and relational needs as well, which is often for community, a sense of belonging, male guidance (since most of the gang members that join the church are male), a place to live and a legal means to earn money, self respect and respect for others. The feature was fascinating as I had no idea such outreach was going on anywhere in this country never mind in London and that it was so successful, in that many of the gang members the Christian former gang members reached out to joined the church and turned their lives around. Such is the positive impact of that church that the police and other state authorities recognise their work. For every negative story put about by those who hate religion or mock it, there is a positive one to counter it.
  5. Murder isn't justifiable regardless of who does it and in what cause. I'm quite sure the communists and Nazis murdered more in their relatively short time on earth than those of faith did in a much longer period by comparison. Human beings can be hideously evil but then most religions know that and address it. The theology of original sin was one avenue of thought which wrestled with man's inhumanity to man, whether religions, ideological or otherwise.
  6. Oh dear. Desperation strikes! I mean, that website - whoever it belongs to (never heard of 'quora.com') - mentions the Crusades. You do know that two sides fought in the Crusades, yes? I don't see any mention of how many people Muslims killed, but I'm quite sure they've pretty much caught up now. But willy measuring isn't my style really given that I don't have one.
  7. If you want to compare the advance of Christianity negatively with something else then I would suggest you look further back in history than ISIS. You will find the advance of Christianity - initially at least - was largely thanks to the Romans, which as an empire converted to the faith by decree of the Emporer(s) (with slight differences between western Christianity and eastern Christianity which remain today). If you want to discuss the way in which Christianity has sometimes been implemented over the last two millennia then your comparison is not far off at certain periods in history because Islam now has taken a turn for the medieval worst just as Christianity did in, er, medieval times. But you really do need to read up on the history of the advance of Christianity if you think it was anything like the spread of ISIS, and you did refer to its advance in the post I replied to.
  8. Saintslass

    The all-new-ish Brexit Thread

    Those who voted leave voted to take back control of the country's borders, laws and money. The campaign was quite clear in its message. Whether an individual voted more for control of borders, laws or money individually or collectively is of course open to debate but ultimately all leave voters voted to regain full sovereignty. That's where May has shown her blinkers: she hasn't grasped this. She thinks people only voted to control EU migration but that's rubbish, as now can be witnessed by just how many leave voters do not support her so-called deal.
  9. I am astounded you actually asked the question in bold. I'm so gobsmacked in fact that the only response I can give is to suggest you do a little research into the history of Christianity because clearly you have no idea at all.
  10. You can pray to anything or anyone you want to and indeed many people do. You'd be amazed at how many people who have never been to church in their adult lives, are usually ambivalent or even hostile to religion, will offer up prayers when a disaster happens or something occurs which knocks their lives off kilter.
  11. To a point that is true because either your parents, your teachers or your local clergy will introduce you to the notion of a God but that is no different from anything else we are introduced to. You will have gone to school and will have been influenced by the interpretation of, say, history that your teacher employed at the time. Your parent(s) will have set out their values and 'dictated' them to you from a very young age when in fact you are at your most pliable. Adults dictate all sorts of things to children, not always good things, and that is not exclusive to religion, organised or not. When we grow into adults ourselves we make our own decisions as to which bits we continue to hold close and which we discard. That applies to everything in life.
  12. According to the Christian faith God is love and God is justice, two sides to the same coin. Therefore, if you love God above everything, love and justice will be your driving forces as it were. You can see that as needy if you like, obviously, but I find it quite refreshing. I think if everyone put love and justice at the top of their life's agenda the world would be a much better place, don't you?
  13. There are Christians in every country of the world, or there were until ISIS arrived in the ME. There are hardly any left now in Iraq (which had a sizeable community) and Afghanistan. The extremists make it hard for Christians in Indonesia, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabia, etc. They are slaughtered in Egypt too. The destabilisation following the West's intervention in Iraq (second war, not first, which was justified IMO - the first one, I mean) has caused a lot of Christians to flee, or those who weren't slaughtered first of course. So while where you are born can of course influence the faith you are introduced to at an early age, finding alternatives everywhere is possible even though in some countries it is extremely risky.
  14. From a purely Christian perspective, Easter IS the main religious festival as that time remembers the crucifixion and resurrection which are central tenets of the faith.
  15. The central message from Jesus was twofold: 'Love God above everything and love others as you love yourself'.
  16. I'm confused as to why you mention religious 'moral superiority'? I can't speak for other religions but I know that Christianity teaches the reverse: that those who follow do so through the grace of God rather than any superior notion of morals. I think you have fallen for a narrative rather than to what is actually taught in the Bible. And Christians go to church because they want to: they meet with friends, they worship their God, they give themselves time to refocus and reflect and rest a little or maybe have a laugh. The Christian church is simply the people; it isn't the building. A church can take place anywhere. But that's an aside. Carols sung by choirboys can be amazing to listen to live. I don't have that privilege when I go to my nine lessons and carols service. Half the time all I can hear is myself, out of tune and squeaking at the high notes!
  17. It's a good question. I think though the answer is probably 'family'. There are family traditions around Christmas, especially when it comes to children, and many of us have happy memories of Christmas as children and have been celebrating it in the way we did then long after our childhood disappeared into a distant memory. Also, children themselves are entranced by Christmas, both the actual Christmas story and the traditions that have grown up around it. They like presents too of course, who doesn't. There is also a universal message there which appeals to people who don't have the cynicism of the so-called liberals on here: that goodwill between human beings and hope for the future do exist and are both worth celebrating/reflecting upon once a year. One of my highlights of the Christmas season is to attend the nine lessons and carols service in the local church. It's packed every year and is a beautiful service.
  18. Saintslass

    Those nice tories

    I don't think he didn't declare; he was found guilty of not declaring on time I believe. Which is why he only had to apologise.
  19. Saintslass

    The all-new-ish Brexit Thread

    So there are no remainer Conservatives?
  20. Saintslass

    Happy Advent

    I've just bought one like that from the Leprosy Mission charity. So not just Catholic schools produce them!
  21. Saintslass

    Happy Advent

    Same here. Wasn't that what all advent calendars used to look like before retailers twigged that they could make a lot more dosh by sticking chocolates behind the doors?
  22. Saintslass

    The all-new-ish Brexit Thread

    Having watched the news this morning I find that last night I listened too closely to media commentators. Grieve's motion changes nothing and doesn't actually take no deal off the table. It was interesting also that May said to Parliament that SHE had been negotiating the deal for the last two years. "I have spent nearly two years negotiating this deal" So it is no wonder Davis and Raab resigned. What was the point of their role? Undermined all the way. But given that it's May who has been 'negotiating' then she should be the one forced to go back to the EU and renegotiate when her plan is voted out next week. Interesting too to hear Labour's shadow attorney general saying that she believes the EU is bluffing. Really? Whodathunkit. She pointed out how they were willing to renegotiate other treaties such as Lisbon when a number of national parliaments disagreed with the original deal. Thus today I do not feel despondent as I did last night. In fact, I feel there is more hope of a better Brexit deal ahead.
  23. Saintslass

    The Culture Wars

    Apparently there had just been some dancing and so it was suggested by some that the media had taken his question out of context and the player herself stated on camera that she didn't feel in any way harassed or otherwise exploited or whatever.
  24. Saintslass

    The all-new-ish Brexit Thread

    Conservative Home, as I said in the post you responded to. *sigh* I do get weary of people replying to my posts when they haven't even read them. And as I have said on more than one occasion, the reason why Davies didn't trumpet the details of his department's work was because it was in progress when they were all blindsided by Chequers. Davies resigned because of that. He spoke about what was in the pipeline when he resigned. May cannot be trusted one millimetre (and I use inches as default but they are simply too large a measure to reflect May's lack of trustworthiness). You may notice that I have not objected to the government being found in contempt (even though I know the speaker has consistently sided with the opposition for a number of years now and so I do have a beef with him overall). This is because although I think the action of Parliament has set a precedent that future governments will regret, I also don't trust May one iota and want to know what it is she is so keen to hide from us all. You may also notice that I haven't yowled or yelled about the government losing how ever many votes they have lost today or the fact that the slimeball Grieve who oozes lawyer and shows no respect for the democratic act of all those foolishly trusting individuals in 2016 (something else that may well come to bite a future government on the backside), and that is because I've given up. All Corbyn wants to do is topple the government. He doesn't give two bodily functions for democracy or indeed the country; he just wants POWER. All May wants to do is continue what she started in 2017 and destroy the government and her party in the process. Meanwhile those of us who voted leave in good faith and who won that vote are now watching those who profess to believe in democracy ignore the biggest act of democracy ever witnessed in the history of this country because it doesn't suit their particular agenda, be that bringing down the government, destroying the Tory party or wanting to stay in the EU (and thus ignoring the winning vote), or indeed all of the above. I no longer give a flying sexual act what happens and I hope you all feel very smug.
  25. Saintslass

    The all-new-ish Brexit Thread

    Remainer gives remain leaning (to the point of falling over) MPs praise shock!