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  1. League Restructure 2019

    It's a sign that for the game to realize the benefit of these new teams over here in America, there will probably have to be a whole new league formed outside the RFL structure, leaving the traditional clubs where they are.
  2. League Restructure 2019

    In other words, M-I-C-K-E-Y M-O-U-S-E.
  3. League Restructure 2019

    Super League Clubs To Miss Deadline On Announcing 2019 Structure reports that Wakefield chairman Michael Carter "Carter confirmed rumours that consideration had been given to expanding Super League to 14 teams but cast doubt over whether Toronto – if they are added – would get an even share of TV money". Clearly there are big difficulties fitting a transatlantic element into the tarted-up version of the old RFL Championship currently masquerading as a Super League.
  4. Carcassonne v Limoux Streaming

    In case anyone missed the match and still wants to watch it, it's on Youtube here.
  5. Any idea that the country with the biggest and richest sports market in the world would want a presence in a league based in a country on the other side of the world from them is simply ludicrous. Yes it is true, for the reasons which I described in earlier post above.
  6. The desired strategic outcome is to start testing/seeding the US market well in advance of the 2025 World Cup which has been provisionally awarded to Moore's group. The fact that Moore has lined up 1 million dollars in backing for New Zealand vs. England in Denver shows that it has strategic value in that context, but Australia vs. Tonga in Hawaii does not.
  7. Of course this proposed match in Hawaii has zero strategic value. Hawaii is halfway across the Pacific and therefore much too far outside the mainstream of North American consciousness for match there to make any useful impact whatsoever, even if without involving the wrong teams.
  8. North America sponsorship myth?

    Such a league may well be in the game's future, with an equal number of big city-based franchises on either side of the Atlantic in two continental divisions (European and American) and an unbalanced schedule to minimize transatlantic travel. That wouldn't sit well with the traditionalists, but it could be a huge money-spinner if it succeeded.
  9. North America sponsorship myth?

    The fears are likely founded in the fact that Toronto and other big cities may be better candidates on balance than most or even all of those there at present, except possibly the other guest clubs (Toulouse and Catalans). The idea of a league combining small towns in the north of England with big cities elsewhere is rather odd to start with, and with the RFL's poor track record seeing how they can make a success of such an odd structure is problematic.
  10. Is it time to resurrect the PSG "brand"

    The basic issue is this: what makes anyone think that sports fans in London, Paris or Toulouse (let alone New York, Philadelphia or Montréal) rate teams from small northern towns like Wigan and St Helens as worth their time and money to watch? If RL had a genuine Super League rather than just a tarted-up version of the old RFL Championship then teams in such places might have a chance to break through and draw big crowds against other big city teams, but as matters stand it's a long shot at best.
  11. Australia vs Tonga in Hawaii

    That was San Diego though, not Honululu.
  12. Australia vs Tonga in Hawaii

    In fact that match was the "Holiday Bowl" played in San Diego, i.e. on the US mainland. It's the mainland fans who need to be reached in order to have a successful World Cup in 2025, and for that the promotion must all be geared to the mainland. Mainland events can reach Hawaii, but the reverse doesn't usually happen;
  13. Australia vs Tonga in Hawaii

    Meninga thinking that a match between Australia and Tonga in Hawaii is the way to "expose our game to the people over there" shows how clueless he is about what's needed to gain that exposure. The proposed Denver match between New Zealand and England would be far better for that purpose. Denver is both the home of a successful NFL team and only a short drive from the campus of an NCAA Division 1A school whose gridiron team plays in one the 5 NCAA Division 1A power conferences and an alumnus of that team (Akarika Dawn) has successfully transitioned to RL. It's just 2 hours behind the east coast, meaning that a 1 PM start would be 3 PM in New York and 8 PM in the UK, good times for TV across the US and Canada and in western Europe too. New Zealand represents the same country as the one "rugby" team of any description which the general sports fan in these parts has even heard of (the All Blacks) so NZ vs. England has market appeal in a way which Australia vs. Tonga simply does not — outside of Hawaii it might be difficult to find many Usonians who've even heard of Tonga. This proposed Hawaii match has none of those advantages. It's 3 time zones further west, so far out of the US mainstream that no one in North America ever thinks much about the place, and only a morning kickoff would ever work for TV here or in Europe. It would involve the wrong teams playing in the wrong place to achieve the desired result. For promotional matches here to make the desired impact in this crowded sports market they have to be very well planned with everything accounted for and covered off. Teams which won't be draws to the general sports fan here playing in such a out-of-the-way place won't cut it.
  14. Many won't like hearing this, but maybe that's just the difference between a small-scale, low profile regional sport and big-scale, high profile national sports.
  15. That's one reason why I think that defensive players would be more likely to make the transition. They would have a shorter learning curve in that respect than offensive guys because they're already accustomed to reading the other team's play and adjusting, so they can likely learn to read situations in RL more easily than the offensive players can.