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bought some steaks from my local aldi(toxteth) they where cheap,held their weight and were fantastically gorgeous. soaked in a mixture of olive oil and soya sauce for an hour before flash frying them as instructed by Heston whatshisname.However,aldi in toxteth is not for the faint of heart and I don't think I have the mental strength to go there again

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bought some steaks from my local aldi(toxteth) they where cheap,held their weight and were fantastically gorgeous. soaked in a mixture of olive oil and soya sauce for an hour before flash frying them as instructed by Heston whatshisname.However,aldi in toxteth is not for the faint of heart and I don't think I have the mental strength to go there again

I had steak the other night, accompanied by Sainsbury's 'Taste the Difference' triple-cooked chips in beef dripping. But the latter seem to have completely vanished from the shelves since, or I'd have bought another lot the next day. And the day after. And the day after that.

 

Is Heston Blumenthal still advocating that method of flipping them every 20 seconds or so? It does work, but it is also a bit of a faff. It does keep you occupied, though.

Edited by Futtocks

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Just to let all in the area know, it is Hastings Seafood and Wine Festival next weekend at the Stade, near the Old Town. This promotes the areas food and locally grown wine (East Sussex has some of the best English Wine).

 

Come and join us for a festival of food, wine and local music. (Not Morris Dancing)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Homemade oxtail and chocolate stew.

 

Slow cooker 8 hours on low, cut the meat with a spoon.

I've got ox cheek on the go, in a red wine, smoked garlic and shallot sauce. But only 5 hours in the slow cooker - I should have started while the NRL GF was still on.

 

I am about to start making mashed potato to go with it, with lots of butter and a spoonful of mayonnaise.

Edited by Futtocks

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Ox cheek..... oh yesssss...

Love em

They're great when you can get them. No proper beef butchers round here, so I have to check in to Morrison's and Waitrose, to see if there are any in stock.

 

Morrison's also do pork cheeks sometimes, which are another staggeringly cheap cut. They'll soon be discovered by the hipsters though, just like lamb shanks, whose price has rocketed in the last five years.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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I love some of the cheap cuts.

You can do so much with them with decent wine, fresh herbs.... basically just get good quality produce.

Donny market has a whole range of butchers. Some specialise in flogging cheaper lower quality meat. Some sell top end locally reared stuff. In my lifetime we've used both. There are usually ox cheeks to be had in winter if you're early enough on market day.

The fish market at Donny is amazing. I got halibut and crabs claws yesterday.

People rave about bury market etc as they do others. But i reckon Donny is as good as any.

Edited by Robin Evans

"I love our club, absolutely love it". (Overton, M 2007)

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I love some of the cheap cuts.

You can do so much with them with decent wine, fresh herbs.... basically just get good quality produce.

Donny market has a whole range of butchers. Some specialise in flogging cheaper lower quality meat. Some sell top end locally reared stuff. In my lifetime we've used both. There are usually ox cheeks to be had in winter if you're early enough on market day.

The fish market at Donny is amazing. I got halibut and crabs claws yesterday.

People rave about bury market etc as they do others. But i reckon Donny is as good as any.

I've never been to either market, but I'd love to. I ration my visits to Borough Market (near London Bridge) because I'd go bankrupt if I didn't. Last time I was at borough, I bought a hare but, thankfully, the guy on the stall jointed it for me. There's also a place up the road from where I live that sells goat - good for a Jamaican curry.

 

The ox cheek came out beautifully, BTW.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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They had hare on at donny yesterday. I occasionally see goat but not always and usually at the polish shop.

There's a fantastic deli there too.

But yes, i have to be strict with what i spend. Otherwise, I'd buy everything.

Its difficult to go there and not leave without cooking ideas whizzin through my head.

Donny market.... a proper food hero

"I love our club, absolutely love it". (Overton, M 2007)

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They had hare on at donny yesterday. I occasionally see goat but not always and usually at the polish shop.

There's a fantastic deli there too.

But yes, i have to be strict with what i spend. Otherwise, I'd buy everything.

Its difficult to go there and not leave without cooking ideas whizzin through my head.

Donny market.... a proper food hero

The worst thing is taking home stuff that goes off before you can cook it, because you were too greedy at the stalls. A very guilty feeling, and one I've managed to evade most of the time. But not always. There's a place on Borough Market that sells mushrooms, and I have sometimes had to discard blackened and rotting fungi before I could enjoy them.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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The worst thing is taking home stuff that goes off before you can cook it, because you were too greedy at the stalls. A very guilty feeling, and one I've managed to evade most of the time. But not always. There's a place on Borough Market that sells mushrooms, and I have sometimes had to discard blackened and rotting fungi before I could enjoy them.

i can so relate to this. I don't plan properly and end up buying i just won't be able to eat.

The cheese stall is my greatest failing.... he also sells the best tub butter...

"I love our club, absolutely love it". (Overton, M 2007)

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Just checked the packaging, Morrison's Ox Cheek is about £7 a kilogramme. The chunk I bought and enjoyed cost me less than £2 for a seriously indulgent meal, and one that could easily have been stretched to feed two, with a little more veg on the side..

Edited by Futtocks

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Simply bake of banana bread to use up some old narnas.

 

Scales wouldn't switch on so guessed the flour and sugar quantities, and I forgot to add the eggs.

 

I also chucked in 3 passion fruit that had a use by date of a month ago.

 

Still a few minutes baking left, lord knows what this will be like.

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In the slow cooker for tonight - 1 ox cheek, two quickly-roasted marrowbones, onions, a little garlic and a tomato, herb & red wine stock. I should have started at 1pm, but I reckon 5 hours will do the job.

 

So I'll be mashing potatoes tonight!

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Do you have gout, Futtocks?

Working on it...

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Futtocks any tips for cooking pork belly?

 

I got a decent sized lump of pork belly today and normally I would just roast it on high to crisp up the skin then turn down low and cook for a couple of hours. Basic seasoning of S&P and some thyme and bits from the garden.

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Futtocks any tips for cooking pork belly?

 

I got a decent sized lump of pork belly today and normally I would just roast it on high to crisp up the skin then turn down low and cook for a couple of hours. Basic seasoning of S&P and some thyme and bits from the garden.

That's a good method. Sage would be a good addition, as long as you don't overdo it.

 

However, I have cooked Shanghai-style pork belly a few times recently, after seeing Rick Stein feature it on one of his shows. This recipe works well as it is, but you can also add a star anise or a piece of cassia bark to the mix, if you have either to hand. Chuck some chopped spring onions into the mix with about 5 minutes to go, too.

 

Turn out the finished pork onto kitchen roll, so the excess fat is absorbed out, but don't leave it on the paper for more than a few seconds, as it should be very sticky if you've cooked it right.

 

Serve with egg fried rice.

Edited by Futtocks

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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That's a good method. Sage would be a good addition, as long as you don't overdo it.

 

However, I have cooked Shanghai-style pork belly a few times recently, after seeing Rick Stein feature it on one of his shows. This recipe works well as it is, but you can also add a star anise or a piece of cassia bark to the mix, if you have either to hand. Chuck some chopped spring onions into the mix with about 5 minutes to go, too.

 

Turn out the finished pork onto kitchen roll, so the excess fat is absorbed out, but don't leave it on the paper for more than a few seconds, as it should be very sticky if you've cooked it right.

 

Serve with egg fried rice.

 

Interesting thanks, I do have a "mature" oriental red sauce in the freezer that I use (and re-use) for braising chicken, that was made with light/dark soy, sugar and star anise if I remember correctly.

 

It's a tough call as I do like crackling and the pork belly is great for that, but tempted to try that recipe. 

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Cracking's great, if you get it right. Often I don't, because I don't roast pork very often and I haven't researched techniques for best results.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Cracking's great, if you get it right. Often I don't, because I don't roast pork very often and I haven't researched techniques for best results.

 

I did and gave up after reading the 50th different way of ensuring you get "perfect crackling"

 

From trial and error I think the key things that seem to improve your chances of success are to make sure the skin is really dry, unwrap and leave out overnight if possible, make sure you score the skin but not right through to the fat. Rub with a bit of oil and lots of salt and some freshly ground pepper. Heat the oven to maximum temp and then cook for 20-30 mins on full, then turn right down and cook slowly for a good few hours

 

Some say to pour over boiling water before drying, others say no oil on the skin, some do low temp first then blast it at the end....some cheat and take the skin off and cook it under the grill.

 

Most of the time I get decent cracking but on the odd occasion for no obvious reason the skin remain un-crispy which is very disappointing.

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I had the last slice of my dad's pizza this evening.

 

He's a bit of a fussy eater and his pizza was a garlic pizza base with cheese, ham and pineapple.

 

I'm 29 and he's had that ever since I can remember. It made me think of this thread a little bit.

 

What are your family recipes/foods?

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