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hindle xiii

Food and drink thread

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Simply bake of banana bread to use up some old narnas.

 

Scales wouldn't switch on so guessed the flour and sugar quantities, and I forgot to add the eggs.

 

I also chucked in 3 passion fruit that had a use by date of a month ago.

 

Still a few minutes baking left, lord knows what this will be like.

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Well, the crispy top was eaten straight out of the oven.

 

I think the lack of egg means it will come apart more. Still tastes ok.

 

I may whizz up another couple of frozen bananas with milk for instant ice cream.

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In the slow cooker for tonight - 1 ox cheek, two quickly-roasted marrowbones, onions, a little garlic and a tomato, herb & red wine stock. I should have started at 1pm, but I reckon 5 hours will do the job.

 

So I'll be mashing potatoes tonight!


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Do you have gout, Futtocks?

Working on it...


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Futtocks any tips for cooking pork belly?

 

I got a decent sized lump of pork belly today and normally I would just roast it on high to crisp up the skin then turn down low and cook for a couple of hours. Basic seasoning of S&P and some thyme and bits from the garden.

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Futtocks any tips for cooking pork belly?

 

I got a decent sized lump of pork belly today and normally I would just roast it on high to crisp up the skin then turn down low and cook for a couple of hours. Basic seasoning of S&P and some thyme and bits from the garden.

That's a good method. Sage would be a good addition, as long as you don't overdo it.

 

However, I have cooked Shanghai-style pork belly a few times recently, after seeing Rick Stein feature it on one of his shows. This recipe works well as it is, but you can also add a star anise or a piece of cassia bark to the mix, if you have either to hand. Chuck some chopped spring onions into the mix with about 5 minutes to go, too.

 

Turn out the finished pork onto kitchen roll, so the excess fat is absorbed out, but don't leave it on the paper for more than a few seconds, as it should be very sticky if you've cooked it right.

 

Serve with egg fried rice.

Edited by Futtocks

Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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That's a good method. Sage would be a good addition, as long as you don't overdo it.

 

However, I have cooked Shanghai-style pork belly a few times recently, after seeing Rick Stein feature it on one of his shows. This recipe works well as it is, but you can also add a star anise or a piece of cassia bark to the mix, if you have either to hand. Chuck some chopped spring onions into the mix with about 5 minutes to go, too.

 

Turn out the finished pork onto kitchen roll, so the excess fat is absorbed out, but don't leave it on the paper for more than a few seconds, as it should be very sticky if you've cooked it right.

 

Serve with egg fried rice.

 

Interesting thanks, I do have a "mature" oriental red sauce in the freezer that I use (and re-use) for braising chicken, that was made with light/dark soy, sugar and star anise if I remember correctly.

 

It's a tough call as I do like crackling and the pork belly is great for that, but tempted to try that recipe. 

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Cracking's great, if you get it right. Often I don't, because I don't roast pork very often and I haven't researched techniques for best results.


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Cracking's great, if you get it right. Often I don't, because I don't roast pork very often and I haven't researched techniques for best results.

 

I did and gave up after reading the 50th different way of ensuring you get "perfect crackling"

 

From trial and error I think the key things that seem to improve your chances of success are to make sure the skin is really dry, unwrap and leave out overnight if possible, make sure you score the skin but not right through to the fat. Rub with a bit of oil and lots of salt and some freshly ground pepper. Heat the oven to maximum temp and then cook for 20-30 mins on full, then turn right down and cook slowly for a good few hours

 

Some say to pour over boiling water before drying, others say no oil on the skin, some do low temp first then blast it at the end....some cheat and take the skin off and cook it under the grill.

 

Most of the time I get decent cracking but on the odd occasion for no obvious reason the skin remain un-crispy which is very disappointing.

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I had the last slice of my dad's pizza this evening.

 

He's a bit of a fussy eater and his pizza was a garlic pizza base with cheese, ham and pineapple.

 

I'm 29 and he's had that ever since I can remember. It made me think of this thread a little bit.

 

What are your family recipes/foods?

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What are your family recipes/foods?

We have a family scrapbook full of recipes that goes back generations. Some are clippings from magazines or newspapers, some are family recipes written down. There are more that a few (usually from the Fifties and Sixties) which we'd never try to do, because they sound absolutely disgusting, but many that we refer back to because they're good and they work. 

 

Mind you, my mum's first cooking experience was a recipe from the book for chicken liver pate, and she thought (at the time) that "one clove of garlic" meant an entire bulb... you can imagine what that smelt like!

 

But sometimes we rediscover recipes, like Mushrooms Shalyapin Style. A Russian recipe that had been snipped from a colour supplement years ago and forgotten, but one that has recently become a family favourite for Christmas Eve. I cook it for myself every now and then too, because it is very tasty.


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Yeah, mine aren't quite as interesting as that! Mine are peanut butter and marmite sandwiches (I actually thought these were paired together by everyone). And for a Christmas starter we have a dish of pudding rice - I think - baked with onions and herbs served with gravy.

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Yeah, mine aren't quite as interesting as that! Mine are peanut butter and marmite sandwiches (I actually thought these were paired together by everyone). And for a Christmas starter we have a dish of pudding rice - I think - baked with onions and herbs served with gravy.

Just remember, nostalgia can blind you and there are some recipes from the past are best avoided.


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Im faving a go at that tom kerridge leg o' lamb.

Rub made of juniper berries n salt, with lemon zest n thyme sprinkled on. Wrapped up in cling film I've banged it back in t'fridge til tomorrow.

Going to wrap it in rosemary and steam it over a base celery white wine garlic n lamb stock..... cookin it slowly taking all rosemary off for the hour....

I love faffin wi snap


"I love our club, absolutely love it". (Overton, M 2007)

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Im faving a go at that tom kerridge leg o' lamb.

Rub made of juniper berries n salt, with lemon zest n thyme sprinkled on. Wrapped up in cling film I've banged it back in t'fridge til tomorrow.

Going to wrap it in rosemary and steam it over a base celery white wine garlic n lamb stock..... cookin it slowly taking all rosemary off for the hour....

I love faffin wi snap

That sounds good!

 

I often use honey and rosemary on a joint of lamb, and always a long slow cook.


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Spare ribs tonight.

  • Overnight dry rub - cumin, smoked garlic powder, coriander seed, smoked paprika, palm sugar, thyme, chives and chilli flakes.

  • Cooking - sprinkle with a little liquid smoke and put into the slow cooker for 3 hours. Then, place the ribs into a baking tray and glaze with BBQ sauce*. Put into the oven, turn the heat to about 180 degrees C and cook 'til the ribs are sticky. Rest until cool enough to handle.

  • Eat. 

  • Wash the mess off your face and hands.

 

 

*Basic BBQ sauce = 2 parts ketchup, 2 parts honey (or 1 part honey, 1 part black treacle) & 1 part Worcester sauce. Mix, taste and then add whatever you fancy. This time, I added some lemon juice and chipotle Tabasco.

Edited by Futtocks

Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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I forgot to mention that, if you don't have Worcester sauce, use soy sauce instead, or something similar. You just need a savoury aspect to the flavour, to balance the sweetness. You can also experiment with adding vinegar to the mix, for a bit of sharpness (bearing in mind that there's already some vinegar in the ketchup).

Edited by Futtocks

Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Spare ribs tonight.

  • Overnight dry rub - cumin, smoked garlic powder, coriander seed, smoked paprika, palm sugar, thyme, chives and chilli flakes.

  • Cooking - sprinkle with a little liquid smoke and put into the slow cooker for 3 hours. Then, place the ribs into a baking tray and glaze with BBQ sauce*. Put into the oven, turn the heat to about 180 degrees C and cook 'til the ribs are sticky. Rest until cool enough to handle.

  • Eat. 

  • Wash the mess off your face and hands.

 

 

*Basic BBQ sauce = 2 parts ketchup, 2 parts honey (or 1 part honey, 1 part black treacle) & 1 part Worcester sauce. Mix, taste and then add whatever you fancy. This time, I added some lemon juice and chipotle Tabasco.

Palm sugar? Is that readily available?

If not will any sugar do and can you give a rough idea of the ratio of the dry rub ingredients?

Thanks


Ron Banks

Bears and Barrow

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Palm sugar? Is that readily available?

If not will any sugar do and can you give a rough idea of the ratio of the dry rub ingredients?

Thanks

I bought a plastic pot of it in Sainsbury's. I think it was shelved with the herbs & spices, rather than the sugar section. Regular sugar will do, at a pinch, but the flavour's different. Or you can leave it out altogether, as I sometimes do. Paprika, thyme, garlic and cumin are the ones I almost always use as a base mix, while the rest are down to whim/availability.

 

Ratios? I just sprinkle roughly the same amount of each on, then rub it well in. You want enough that it will spread over the meat's surface, rather than caking it in a solid (and expensive) layer. It will have all night and much of the next day for the flavours to sink in. Salt and sugar will draw moisture out that will mix with the spices and coat the meat effectively. Slow cooking will blend the flavours too.

 

It is not a precise science, so experiment!


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Think thats weird?

Here in Coventry people eat pies that are NOT meat and potato!

I dont get it. How can a pie NOT be meat and potato?

A butter pie? ie just potato. Or a meat pie? ie just meat. These are acceptable variants. 

Mind you Coventry is neither North or South so perhaps the pie reflects such nomanslandishness.

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