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What are your family recipes/foods?

We have a family scrapbook full of recipes that goes back generations. Some are clippings from magazines or newspapers, some are family recipes written down. There are more that a few (usually from the Fifties and Sixties) which we'd never try to do, because they sound absolutely disgusting, but many that we refer back to because they're good and they work. 

 

Mind you, my mum's first cooking experience was a recipe from the book for chicken liver pate, and she thought (at the time) that "one clove of garlic" meant an entire bulb... you can imagine what that smelt like!

 

But sometimes we rediscover recipes, like Mushrooms Shalyapin Style. A Russian recipe that had been snipped from a colour supplement years ago and forgotten, but one that has recently become a family favourite for Christmas Eve. I cook it for myself every now and then too, because it is very tasty.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Yeah, mine aren't quite as interesting as that! Mine are peanut butter and marmite sandwiches (I actually thought these were paired together by everyone). And for a Christmas starter we have a dish of pudding rice - I think - baked with onions and herbs served with gravy.

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Yeah, mine aren't quite as interesting as that! Mine are peanut butter and marmite sandwiches (I actually thought these were paired together by everyone). And for a Christmas starter we have a dish of pudding rice - I think - baked with onions and herbs served with gravy.

Just remember, nostalgia can blind you and there are some recipes from the past are best avoided.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Im faving a go at that tom kerridge leg o' lamb.

Rub made of juniper berries n salt, with lemon zest n thyme sprinkled on. Wrapped up in cling film I've banged it back in t'fridge til tomorrow.

Going to wrap it in rosemary and steam it over a base celery white wine garlic n lamb stock..... cookin it slowly taking all rosemary off for the hour....

I love faffin wi snap

"I love our club, absolutely love it". (Overton, M 2007)

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Im faving a go at that tom kerridge leg o' lamb.

Rub made of juniper berries n salt, with lemon zest n thyme sprinkled on. Wrapped up in cling film I've banged it back in t'fridge til tomorrow.

Going to wrap it in rosemary and steam it over a base celery white wine garlic n lamb stock..... cookin it slowly taking all rosemary off for the hour....

I love faffin wi snap

That sounds good!

 

I often use honey and rosemary on a joint of lamb, and always a long slow cook.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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  • 2 months later...

Spare ribs tonight.

  • Overnight dry rub - cumin, smoked garlic powder, coriander seed, smoked paprika, palm sugar, thyme, chives and chilli flakes.

  • Cooking - sprinkle with a little liquid smoke and put into the slow cooker for 3 hours. Then, place the ribs into a baking tray and glaze with BBQ sauce*. Put into the oven, turn the heat to about 180 degrees C and cook 'til the ribs are sticky. Rest until cool enough to handle.

  • Eat. 

  • Wash the mess off your face and hands.

 

 

*Basic BBQ sauce = 2 parts ketchup, 2 parts honey (or 1 part honey, 1 part black treacle) & 1 part Worcester sauce. Mix, taste and then add whatever you fancy. This time, I added some lemon juice and chipotle Tabasco.

Edited by Futtocks

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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I forgot to mention that, if you don't have Worcester sauce, use soy sauce instead, or something similar. You just need a savoury aspect to the flavour, to balance the sweetness. You can also experiment with adding vinegar to the mix, for a bit of sharpness (bearing in mind that there's already some vinegar in the ketchup).

Edited by Futtocks

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Spare ribs tonight.

  • Overnight dry rub - cumin, smoked garlic powder, coriander seed, smoked paprika, palm sugar, thyme, chives and chilli flakes.

  • Cooking - sprinkle with a little liquid smoke and put into the slow cooker for 3 hours. Then, place the ribs into a baking tray and glaze with BBQ sauce*. Put into the oven, turn the heat to about 180 degrees C and cook 'til the ribs are sticky. Rest until cool enough to handle.

  • Eat. 

  • Wash the mess off your face and hands.

 

 

*Basic BBQ sauce = 2 parts ketchup, 2 parts honey (or 1 part honey, 1 part black treacle) & 1 part Worcester sauce. Mix, taste and then add whatever you fancy. This time, I added some lemon juice and chipotle Tabasco.

Palm sugar? Is that readily available?

If not will any sugar do and can you give a rough idea of the ratio of the dry rub ingredients?

Thanks

Ron Banks

Midlands Hurricanes and Barrow

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Palm sugar? Is that readily available?

If not will any sugar do and can you give a rough idea of the ratio of the dry rub ingredients?

Thanks

I bought a plastic pot of it in Sainsbury's. I think it was shelved with the herbs & spices, rather than the sugar section. Regular sugar will do, at a pinch, but the flavour's different. Or you can leave it out altogether, as I sometimes do. Paprika, thyme, garlic and cumin are the ones I almost always use as a base mix, while the rest are down to whim/availability.

 

Ratios? I just sprinkle roughly the same amount of each on, then rub it well in. You want enough that it will spread over the meat's surface, rather than caking it in a solid (and expensive) layer. It will have all night and much of the next day for the flavours to sink in. Salt and sugar will draw moisture out that will mix with the spices and coat the meat effectively. Slow cooking will blend the flavours too.

 

It is not a precise science, so experiment!

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Think thats weird?

Here in Coventry people eat pies that are NOT meat and potato!

I dont get it. How can a pie NOT be meat and potato?

A butter pie? ie just potato. Or a meat pie? ie just meat. These are acceptable variants. 

Mind you Coventry is neither North or South so perhaps the pie reflects such nomanslandishness.

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I've been given some pigs trotters, how's the best way to cook 'em?

"Freedom without socialism is privilege and injustice, socialism without freedom is slavery and brutality" - Mikhail Bakunin

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Cook em with pork bones onion celery and carrotts for 3 hours... strain the reduce for another 45 mins and use as jelly in your home made growlers....

Making mine tomorrow

"I love our club, absolutely love it". (Overton, M 2007)

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I've been given some pigs trotters, how's the best way to cook 'em?

Have they had the bones taken out? If so, you can stuff them before cooking.

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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Just had a look online, and you can cook trotters in a similar style to Shanghai-style red braised pork belly. The latter is a recipe I've cooked a few times over the last year and enjoyed every time.

 

Not particularly Christmassy by British standards, but should be tasty.

Edited by Futtocks

"We are easily breakable, by illness or falling, or a million other ways of leaving this earthly life. We are just so much mashed potato."  Don Estelle

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