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I've been given some pigs trotters, how's the best way to cook 'em?


"Freedom without socialism is privilege and injustice, socialism without freedom is slavery and brutality" - Mikhail Bakunin

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Cook em with pork bones onion celery and carrotts for 3 hours... strain the reduce for another 45 mins and use as jelly in your home made growlers....

Making mine tomorrow


"I love our club, absolutely love it". (Overton, M 2007)

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Managed to get some top quality italian lard for my pork pies.... crispy pastry assured


"I love our club, absolutely love it". (Overton, M 2007)

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I've been given some pigs trotters, how's the best way to cook 'em?

Have they had the bones taken out? If so, you can stuff them before cooking.


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Just had a look online, and you can cook trotters in a similar style to Shanghai-style red braised pork belly. The latter is a recipe I've cooked a few times over the last year and enjoyed every time.

 

Not particularly Christmassy by British standards, but should be tasty.

Edited by Futtocks

Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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Growlers made up ready for t'oven.

Pig's trotters n bones bubbling for my jelly....


"I love our club, absolutely love it". (Overton, M 2007)

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"Bill Kenyon of Ultimate Purveyors from St Helens, who were commissioned to make the pie, said: "This is the first step to enable mankind to consume pies with more elegance and comfort"

 

 A pie from Snellins?  That is SO WRONG!!!. and ELEGANCE from Snellins? That really is tripe!

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-38334437

Edited by JohnM

Four legs good - two legs bad

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I've been given some pigs trotters, how's the best way to cook 'em?

 

Simmer them in seasoned water for 24 hours, drain them, dry them in kitchen towels then throw them straight down the toilet to cut out the middleman.


Four legs good - two legs bad

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A warm (thats waaaarm to our southern friends) pie, with jelly dribbling down my chin and congealing in the ginger mass of my beard is not a thing of beauty or elegance.... but oh my word its a thing of taste


"I love our club, absolutely love it". (Overton, M 2007)

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"Bill Kenyon of Ultimate Purveyors from St Helens, who were commissioned to make the pie, said: "This is the first step to enable mankind to consume pies with more elegance and comfort"

 

 A pie from Snellins?  That is SO WRONG!!!. and ELEGANCE from Snellins? That really is tripe!

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-38334437

It is the only place for well engineered pies and indeed the first pie in space is bound to end up on a sign post at the entrances to the town..... just like they did for the SPOTYA team awards.

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I did and gave up after reading the 50th different way of ensuring you get "perfect crackling"

 

From trial and error I think the key things that seem to improve your chances of success are to make sure the skin is really dry, unwrap and leave out overnight if possible, make sure you score the skin but not right through to the fat. Rub with a bit of oil and lots of salt and some freshly ground pepper. Heat the oven to maximum temp and then cook for 20-30 mins on full, then turn right down and cook slowly for a good few hours

 

Some say to pour over boiling water before drying, others say no oil on the skin, some do low temp first then blast it at the end....some cheat and take the skin off and cook it under the grill.

 

Most of the time I get decent cracking but on the odd occasion for no obvious reason the skin remain un-crispy which is very disappointing.

 

 

 

I have tried every method for making the best crackling...my favourite and simplest...never fails provided the oven is at correct temperature...is 1) make sure skin has been scored.. 2) rub half a fresh lemon over the skin..get in all the cracks..3)  sprinkle a good sea salt over skin ..rub in...That it...The lemon aids the crackling ..producing bubbles ..a very delicious crackling no citrus taste. 

 

 

If I wanted a Chinese style belly pork but the crackling as well...before cooking separate  the skin from belly...lay skin on flat tray..then do method above.   

 

Then in a large dish or  container...throw in brown sugar, paprika, any herbs you like chilli powder...take the belly ..rub mix into every nook n cranny....slice some lemons...take some vodka..poor over ..rest in fridge for few hrs...cook belly in one oven dish..crackling on another...n voila best of both worlds. ..You could slow bbq the meat..do the crackling in oven...:) 

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MacSweens venison haggis, served with potato & broccoli gratins - yep, I went to Lidl yesterday.


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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2 hours ago, Futtocks said:

MacSweens venison haggis, served with potato & broccoli gratins - yep, I went to Lidl yesterday.

Pros: pretty damn tasty, as you'd expect from MacSweens.

Cons: not overtly gamey or venison-flavoured. 


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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On 17/12/2016 at 10:11 AM, JohnM said:

Buy the cheapest, run it through the liquidiser on full for 60 secs, decant into a ...decanter.  Trust me, it works.

 

 

See here http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-aerate-y-163691

This is for red wine. This works better with some wines than others, but it is definitely worth trying. I use a hand blender, but the idea of aerating the liquid and shortening the breathing period is the same. For decanting, a large clean glass/ceramic jug will do, and they are much easier to clean than most wine decanters.

 

With white wine, I find that having it straight from the fridge is often worse than letting it lose a little of the chill. By that, I don't mean drinking it at room temperature; just not freezing cold. Of course, different fridges and different rooms have varying temperatures, so there's no hard and fast rule. In general, I prefer the more acidic wines (Sauvignon blanc and German/Austrian varieties) to be served colder than, say Chardonnay or Chenin blanc.


Millions long for immortality who don't know what to do with themselves on a rainy Sunday afternoon. (Susan Ertz)

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