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4 minutes ago, gingerjon said:

Yes, I jumped the gun based on a normally reliable account who has since amended their posts.

He is not allowed to perform pending an ongoing investigation. There is no guarantee, or, indeed, indication, that this investigation will be concluded by this evening.

I have seen about three different versions of what the investigation relates to and am therefore not drawing any conclusions on whether it relates in any way to Israel or not.

I may have to watch though - I wasn't going to - just to see the torrent of abuse that the organisers appear to be setting up to be hit with. Far worse than the crowd banter during their ROBBING BLIND OF FINLAND last year.

It's a sad situation and I feel for the EBU they are in an almost impossible situation.

I wouldn't worry about the robbing of Finland, this year's favourites have basically just copied their formula.

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4 minutes ago, Maximus Decimus said:

It's a sad situation and I feel for the EBU they are in an almost impossible situation.

I wouldn't worry about the robbing of Finland, this year's favourites have basically just copied their formula.

I will be wounded forever on behalf of Finland*

 

(* = I had to go back and check what it was that I pretended to be worked up about last year.)

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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He has now been disqualified.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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Just now, Maximus Decimus said:

Well my post aged well.

Have they given reasons? If it seen as being Israel's fault, there is going to be carnage.

The irony is that they probably have the best actual song.

I’ve only seen the BBC news flash which didn’t say anything.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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2 minutes ago, Maximus Decimus said:

Apparently, it's related to an assault on a female production crew member after the semi-final.

Can't believe owt on social media 🙄.

I have read that 'assault' in this context could been anything from full on sexual violence to shouting.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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4 hours ago, gingerjon said:

I have read that 'assault' in this context could been anything from full on sexual violence to shouting.

Yes 'allegation of intimidation' is what is being used.

However, if police are investigating it then you'd have to think it is more than shouting.

After all, it's not Scotland...

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18 minutes ago, Maximus Decimus said:

Yes 'allegation of intimidation' is what is being used.

However, if police are investigating it then you'd have to think it is more than shouting.

After all, it's not Scotland...

This is a statement from the Dutch broadcaster. As it's on their official feed, I'll assume it's genuine:

Image

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Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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Posted (edited)

Bambie Thug said in a post to Instagram that they have raised "multiple complaints" to Eurovision organisers over "instances" they have experienced this week.
Bambie claimed that the Eurovision Broadcasting Union (EBU) earlier confirmed to their delegation that Israeli broadcaster Kan had "broken the rules of conduct during the Eurovision semi-final 1".

This might match with rumours from Friday of a group claiming to be from the Israeli media trying to provoke people backstage during the rehearsals.

Edited by Futtocks

Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

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1 hour ago, Futtocks said:

Bambie Thug said in a post to Instagram that they have raised "multiple complaints" to Eurovision organisers over "instances" they have experienced this week.
Bambie claimed that the Eurovision Broadcasting Union (EBU) earlier confirmed to their delegation that Israeli broadcaster Kan had "broken the rules of conduct during the Eurovision semi-final 1".

This might match with rumours from Friday of a group claiming to be from the Israeli media trying to provoke people backstage during the rehearsals.

I wouldn't trust a word they say.

If you've real what the Israeli media actually said, it was barely anything.

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10 minutes ago, The Hallucinating Goose said:

For me there just hasn't been one that has particularly stood out yet. A lot of them seem to just be blending together. It seems more about the staging and show around the song than the song itself these days. 

The staging is amazing nowadays.

I'd recommend watching the semis, makes it more enjoyable IMO being familiar with the songs.

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Posted (edited)

Sweden: Marcus & Martinus are a simultaneously childlike and gnarled pair of twins.
The song is Unforgettable.
The song is forgettable.
Hosting Eurovision is expensive.

Ukraine: rated as a good chance of doing well, Jerry Heil flubs a few high notes, but then settles into something that probably translates as "Putin has a very small winkie" while being windswept atop the world's largest doorstop. Alyona Alyona provides the rap which would actually sound decent if I knew what she was saying.

Germany: Isaak sits by a brazier like he's waiting for Arthur Scargill to turn up and provide a blistering solo on the euphemism. The song sounds a lot like they recycled a few successful songs from the last couple of years of Eurovision.

Luxembourg: I liked them in the semi-final. Bouncy, danceable, jazzy fun. Plus she she can actually hit a high note unlike some of the more painful diva-esque ululaters. Rubbish graphics, mind.

Netherlands: a tumbleweed rolls across the stage.

Israel: Lots of dramatic dry ice for this power ballad. Given the pressure this teenage singer's under just because of her nationality, her performance is nervelessy immaculate. Politics aside, a trouper.

Lithuania: first really silly trousers of the evening klaxon! One for the dance floors of Summer 2024. The nose jewellery does make me think of Robbie Fowler, though.

Spain: Oh joy, a Keytar! This is very 'Eurotrash' in a good way, and she's got the crowd chanting along, which is a great sign. Chunky male dancers in thongs doing somersaults and the splits is extremely on-message.

Estonia: I still haven't forgiven them for not sending Winny Puuh to Eurovision a few years ago with "Meiecundimees üks Korsakov läks eile Lätti". This year's offering is a bit laddish and they all look like hired goons from an ultra-cheap Stephen Seagal inaction flick shot in Eastern Europe for tax reasons.

Ireland: I called Bambie Thug "Full Metal Lene Lovich" at the semi-finals and I stand by this assessment.

Latvia: An AI construct called "Dons" stands in a toilet roll sporting a blue breastplate/chinos combo. A good rendition of a song that's a bit too safe.
Age him twenty years, and he'll look like one of those slightly mad managers from the African Cup of Nations, throbbing forehead vein and all.

Greece: Purple lamé Depends are "a look", I suppose. She's playing up the folky accents on a very electronic track and the performance has got tons of energy, but the song's lacking a really good hook.

United Kingdom: This is all very well-meaning, but it sounds like it was written by someone who owed Louis Walsh money. His wispy little voice isn't selling it much either. The staging's certainly eye-catching. A mid-table finish would be a good result.

Norway: If they don't win, will this be a scandal called Gåtegate? Someone's playing an instrument that's a bit hurdy-gurdyish, but it's more of a stadium rock track for moody people who only wear black clothes but get very snippy when you call them Goths.

Italy: Angelino Mango with a fruity little number. Did you see what I did there? Oh, suit yourself.
Seriously, this does have high-finishing potential. It grabs you while it's on, although it doesn't last long after.

Serbia: This doomy ballad didn't get to me in the semi-final. Nothing has changed since Tuesday evening.

Finland: Oh no! it's the Zany Funsters!

Portugal: Masked dancers again (which was the fashion of the time). Another song that's hard to really criticise but also hard to remember.

Armenia: Where everyone is called Ian. The group is named after a budget Eastern European off-road vehicle.
This is one of those bouncy folk-pop numbers that could be enhanced by some top-heavy Polish milk-churners. Yes, you know exactly what I'm referring to, you dirty beggar.

Cyprus: Australia didn't make it through the semis, but the singer here's an Aussie, so expect plenty of votes from the convicts when we tot up later. The song itself is a cookie-cutter Euro-banger, but that's not important right now.

Switzerland: He's wearing a skirt, so he's every Express/Mail reader's confirmation that the barbarians are at the gates and we'll all be murdered in our beds or something. A heavy favourite for everyone else.

Slovenia: Raiven looks like an incidental character from "The Lexx" and there's a bit of sub-Ken Russell writhing going on with the scantily-clad young men of the dance troupe. I doubt this would have happened with the Lionel Blair Dancers. Ooh, I dunno though, thinking about it.

Croatia: Here's the favourite and you can see why. It gets the crowd up on its feet. Shameless and all the better for it.

Georgia: A songa love? Maybe, but the singer's Nutsa! Actually quite an intense performance and I think it will finish in the left hand column by the end of the show.

France: it's Bailar Crais from Farscape* in a wafty cheesecloth blouse and a big wibbly-wobbly stadium ballad. Repetitive, but it seems to be going down well in the venue.
*references, as always, strictly for the teenagers.

Austria: I'm running short of Bacofoil too. Must add that to the shopping list. The song's not great, but at least it's finishing off this first part of the show on a high energy spike, which is absolutely appropriate.

Edited by Futtocks
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Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Posted (edited)

The UK sneaked onto the left hand column of the jury votes, then got sweet FA in the public vote (the only contestant to do so).

The UK gave Israel the maximum 12 points in the public vote because, as the majority of the gutter press will tell you, we're living in a viciously brown anti-Semitic caliphate.

Edited by Futtocks

Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

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4 minutes ago, Futtocks said:

The UK sneaked onto the left hand column of the jury votes, then got sweet FA in the public vote (the only contestant to do so).

The UK gave Israel the maximum 12 points in the public vote because, as the majority of the gutter press will tell you, we're living in a viciously brown anti-Semitic caliphate.

Maybe it was just the best song? Personally, I think it demonstrated how the juries were very reluctant to give Israel any points for political reasons.

Very pleased with the song that won though. Thought Croatia's was a bit too obvious and very pleased Ireland's didn't really challenge.

As I said earlier, the UK's chance of winning bombed after the first showing on the semi-final. For all the talk of an amazing set-up by the commentators, it really turned people off. And when Israel got over 300 votes in the public jury, we can hardly use the 'Europe hates us' line as an excuse.

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6 hours ago, Maximus Decimus said:

Personally, I think it demonstrated how the juries were very reluctant to give Israel any points for political reasons.

Perhaps they just didn't think it was the best song?

Cos, it really wasn't to my ear. It would have been outside my top ten as a fairly generic piece of well put together middle tier Eurovisioning. But, similar to Ukraine a few years ago, there were an awful lot of people who wanted to make a point, and fair play to them for doing so, by voting for it. Difference being, Ukraine's entry was at least distinct.

Okay with the winner. Not my favourite but also not one where you'll look back and wonder how that could have happened.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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5 hours ago, gingerjon said:

Perhaps they just didn't think it was the best song?

Cos, it really wasn't to my ear. It would have been outside my top ten as a fairly generic piece of well put together middle tier Eurovisioning. But, similar to Ukraine a few years ago, there were an awful lot of people who wanted to make a point, and fair play to them for doing so, by voting for it. Difference being, Ukraine's entry was at least distinct.

Okay with the winner. Not my favourite but also not one where you'll look back and wonder how that could have happened.

Of course Israel's public vote was affected by political events. I suspect there was a mixture of pro-Israeli support but also people who didn't like how she'd been treated. My wife is pretty apolitical and hasn't a clue about Gaza, and she certainly felt sorry for her.

IMO it's very likely the juries were affected in the opposite way. There was a great deal of hostility towards Israel's entry. There was a woman in the rehearsal who refused to read out Israel 12 points, Loreen said she wouldn't hand the trophy to Israel and numerous acts (Greece, Ireland, Netherlands) had been openly hostile. I can't remember a time when the 2nd favourite got so few of the juries votes.

It was honestly my favourite, but that doesn't mean much when it comes to Eurovision and I don't think it would ever have won. 

Switzerland was a very popular winner in my house, my 7 year old daughter was absolutely made up.

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