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Rugby League World Cup 2021 (Merged Threads)


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24 minutes ago, Gomersall said:

This bit really got me in that article. I think the phrase being used here means something different in Oz. 

"Just seeing the likes of a few of the Penrith boys coming out and I’ve had few text messages from other players who haven’t come out yet" 

🤔

-------

In all seriousness though, good news to see more and more players strengthening the Pacific Island teams, and weakening the Aussies at the same time! 😁

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1 hour ago, The Hallucinating Goose said:

This bit really got me in that article. I think the phrase being used here means something different in Oz. 

"Just seeing the likes of a few of the Penrith boys coming out and I’ve had few text messages from other players who haven’t come out yet" 

🤔

-------

In all seriousness though, good news to see more and more players strengthening the Pacific Island teams, and weakening the Aussies at the same time! 😁

 

FA1D94EC-5AA6-46CA-95CA-5ED6FBD15055.png

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2 hours ago, The Hallucinating Goose said:

This bit really got me in that article. I think the phrase being used here means something different in Oz. 

"Just seeing the likes of a few of the Penrith boys coming out and I’ve had few text messages from other players who haven’t come out yet" 

🤔

-------

In all seriousness though, good news to see more and more players strengthening the Pacific Island teams, and weakening the Aussies at the same time! 😁

There`s no questioning what he meant in the following statement :

"I guess probably my last World Cup wasn't the best." he said. "I sort of treated it as a little vacation and probably drank a bit too often, and ate more than I should have," he said.
 

I`d be very wary relying on blokes like Papalii, patently past his best I find it very hard to imagine that he`s going to treat this WC any different than the last, especially potentially surrounded by others past their best, the inclusion of blokes like him could do more harm than good for the Samoan team and be a bad influence on the young blokes who might actually want to win.

 

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Papalii is on the homeward bound leg of his career, but I think he can still add 20 minute stints to solidify them upfront.

I just hope he doesn't treat it as a jolly this time around. I like him as a chap. Hope he can bring a few more along with him. That might be the best part of him declaring for Samoa. He's an older head who younger guys will be more likely to follow.

Wishing him well.

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24 minutes ago, The Rocket said:

There`s no questioning what he meant in the following statement :

"I guess probably my last World Cup wasn't the best." he said. "I sort of treated it as a little vacation and probably drank a bit too often, and ate more than I should have," he said.
 

I`d be very wary relying on blokes like Papalii, patently past his best I find it very hard to imagine that he`s going to treat this WC any different than the last, especially potentially surrounded by others past their best, the inclusion of blokes like him could do more harm than good for the Samoan team and be a bad influence on the young blokes who might actually want to win.

And I was criticised for stating this was a major issue with Samoa in previous World Cups. He is not the first Samoan player to come out with a statement like this over the years either.

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9 hours ago, RigbyLuger said:

I'm not sure the Speaker has seen much of our WSL and the NRLW.

Says he attends games when in his chorley constituency…..has he ever thought of attending games while in London?  Apart from Cup finals of course where he will probably be an invited guest.

 

Just think of the publicity potential of him going along to the Skolars occasionally.

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21 hours ago, The Future is League said:

I'm sure the women's world cup will get a lot of positive publicity due to the success of the England women soccer team this past weekend.

I'm coming back to this, having had a bit of time to mull.

A key issue that I think we have - (note: think, I'm happy to be corrected) - is that in all aspects, we are treating women's rugby league as just an extension of the men's game. This is not what people necessarily want or expect. It's also not how women's football (and cricket - I can't really talk about other sports) have achieved what they've achieved.

For example, there has been some moaning over the years that (especially) women's football has had everything handed to it on a plate by a craven woke establishment (blah blah blah).

But, whilst the timing was right, there was still a lot of hard graft being done. And, in the main, it was being done by people whose primary focus was the women's game *and visibly the women's game*. I can name a whole bunch of people I follow on social media who are active in different ways but who have become the go-to people to find out a bit more about women's football. I can also do the same with cricket. These people and accounts sometimes have *some* official status but often they are doing their own thing as well.

I can't honestly say the same is true for women's rugby league. Not that there aren't people working hard but I can't see this additional wrap around culture. And, having reflected a bit, I think it's absolutely essential for success. We absolutely need to have these additional voices, people, attitudes, and ways of supporting.

I don't think we're close to being there. But, like I say, I would be more than happy to be proven wrong.

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Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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2 hours ago, gingerjon said:

I'm coming back to this, having had a bit of time to mull.

A key issue that I think we have - (note: think, I'm happy to be corrected) - is that in all aspects, we are treating women's rugby league as just an extension of the men's game. This is not what people necessarily want or expect. It's also not how women's football (and cricket - I can't really talk about other sports) have achieved what they've achieved.

For example, there has been some moaning over the years that (especially) women's football has had everything handed to it on a plate by a craven woke establishment (blah blah blah).

But, whilst the timing was right, there was still a lot of hard graft being done. And, in the main, it was being done by people whose primary focus was the women's game *and visibly the women's game*. I can name a whole bunch of people I follow on social media who are active in different ways but who have become the go-to people to find out a bit more about women's football. I can also do the same with cricket. These people and accounts sometimes have *some* official status but often they are doing their own thing as well.

I can't honestly say the same is true for women's rugby league. Not that there aren't people working hard but I can't see this additional wrap around culture. And, having reflected a bit, I think it's absolutely essential for success. We absolutely need to have these additional voices, people, attitudes, and ways of supporting.

I don't think we're close to being there. But, like I say, I would be more than happy to be proven wrong.

What are doing as a sport to promote the women's game? We need to do more than just "here's a couple who play together/for opposite teams" and just treat it like the men. Ask about matches, opposition, not just the issue of the day.

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3 hours ago, gingerjon said:

I'm coming back to this, having had a bit of time to mull.

A key issue that I think we have - (note: think, I'm happy to be corrected) - is that in all aspects, we are treating women's rugby league as just an extension of the men's game. This is not what people necessarily want or expect. It's also not how women's football (and cricket - I can't really talk about other sports) have achieved what they've achieved.

For example, there has been some moaning over the years that (especially) women's football has had everything handed to it on a plate by a craven woke establishment (blah blah blah).

But, whilst the timing was right, there was still a lot of hard graft being done. And, in the main, it was being done by people whose primary focus was the women's game *and visibly the women's game*. I can name a whole bunch of people I follow on social media who are active in different ways but who have become the go-to people to find out a bit more about women's football. I can also do the same with cricket. These people and accounts sometimes have *some* official status but often they are doing their own thing as well.

I can't honestly say the same is true for women's rugby league. Not that there aren't people working hard but I can't see this additional wrap around culture. And, having reflected a bit, I think it's absolutely essential for success. We absolutely need to have these additional voices, people, attitudes, and ways of supporting.

I don't think we're close to being there. But, like I say, I would be more than happy to be proven wrong.

Good post. I think the best outcome for Women's RL after the WC would be for us to shift our approach to treating Women's RL as its own thing. 

The point about women's sports having their own experts and champions is an interesting one, and I think this is something we can make something of. 

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16 minutes ago, RigbyLuger said:

On a tangent to the point of @gingerjonon the women's game, why are we playing a pre-WC international between Ireland and Caanda at an amateur ground in Wigan? 

On a Tuesday at 2pm.

http://www.canadarugbyleague.com/canada-ravens-face-ireland-world-cup-warm-game/

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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3 hours ago, Dave T said:

The point about women's sports having their own experts and champions is an interesting one, and I think this is something we can make something of. 

As I say, I'd like nothing more than to be pointed in the direction of RL equivalents of Suzy Wrack, Carrie Dunn, SheKicks, Girls on the Ball (etc), who all pre-date the current surge by a fair old time and have got some interesting stories to tell even as spectators. I worry that any good work we do in this area is going to miss out on the essential re-amplification that this kind of circle of voices provides.

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Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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6 hours ago, gingerjon said:

I'm coming back to this, having had a bit of time to mull.

A key issue that I think we have - (note: think, I'm happy to be corrected) - is that in all aspects, we are treating women's rugby league as just an extension of the men's game. This is not what people necessarily want or expect. It's also not how women's football (and cricket - I can't really talk about other sports) have achieved what they've achieved.

For example, there has been some moaning over the years that (especially) women's football has had everything handed to it on a plate by a craven woke establishment (blah blah blah).

But, whilst the timing was right, there was still a lot of hard graft being done. And, in the main, it was being done by people whose primary focus was the women's game *and visibly the women's game*. I can name a whole bunch of people I follow on social media who are active in different ways but who have become the go-to people to find out a bit more about women's football. I can also do the same with cricket. These people and accounts sometimes have *some* official status but often they are doing their own thing as well.

I can't honestly say the same is true for women's rugby league. Not that there aren't people working hard but I can't see this additional wrap around culture. And, having reflected a bit, I think it's absolutely essential for success. We absolutely need to have these additional voices, people, attitudes, and ways of supporting.

I don't think we're close to being there. But, like I say, I would be more than happy to be proven wrong.

Agree on the sentiment in this post.

What I don't really understand is if the women's game is being effectively unwritten and controlled by SL then how are we still in a situation where women are out of pocket to play for a huge SL club like Leeds Rhinos. Either it is amateur and independent or professional and run professionally? Will there be academies for both men and women run by professional clubs going forward?

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3 hours ago, Henson Park Old Firm said:

the WC is turning into a mini NRL, with all the players deserting the Kangaroos

Most WCs are.

Isn't the ratio of players who usually in WCs something like 55% NRL about 40% SL and 5% Lower league players from Oz and UK championship and L1?

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1 hour ago, Scubby said:

Agree on the sentiment in this post.

What I don't really understand is if the women's game is being effectively unwritten and controlled by SL then how are we still in a situation where women are out of pocket to play for a huge SL club like Leeds Rhinos. Either it is amateur and independent or professional and run professionally? Will there be academies for both men and women run by professional clubs going forward?

To give a couple of comparisons: some women players in last year's The Hundred were, thanks to the insanely low bottom salary on offer to women, working under minimum wage to the effect that even when on full time contracts they were having to take out additional jobs; until very recently some WSL (soccer) 'full time' contracts did not top £16,000pa.

So, it's not good enough, but it's not *uniquely* not good enough.

Build a man a fire, and he'll be warm for a day. Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life. (Terry Pratchett)

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